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Full text of "Vogue"

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For Reference 

Do Not Take 

From the Library 



Every person who maliciously 
cuts, defaces, breaks or injures 
any book, map, chart, picture, 
engraving, statue, coin, model, 
apparatus, or other wvork of lit- 
erature, art, mechanics or ob- 
ject of curiosity, deposited in 
any public library, gallery, 
museum or collection is guilty 
of a misdemeanor. 

Penal Code of California 
1915, Section 623 





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THE FRAGRANCE THAT CAPTURES THE DREAM 



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Pop Art for the Nineties. From American designer Isaac Mizrahi, 
linen blazer; S50.00. Cotton jersey top; 280.00. Linen shorts; 250.00. 

In Collectors. Washington Oregon'California/Virginiai to order by phone, call I -SOO-ifS-IOOO. 



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V.O G L' E APRIL 1990 



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APRIL 




FASHION 

86 
Fashion clips 

By Page Hill Starzinger 



101-130 
Vogue's view 

Andre Leon Talley uncovers the inspirations behind coutur 
designs. . . Stephanie Mansfield on Sofia Coppola's Cal-Ital s. 

142 
Elements 

The raw, unpolished jewelry of designer Mercedes Robiros 

146 

Vogue alive! . . .at stores across the country 

325 
Point of view 

326 
Scene at the couture 

Paris designs — lightened with glorious color, curvy shapes, luxe iaili 



348-375 fitness & fashion 



348 Grafs dash 

Tennis queen Steffi Grafs off-court glamour 

354 The new short story 

Paired with a jacket, tailored shorts form the new summer su 

358 Designers: beachside 

Top designers turn the swimsuit into a real piece of clothinf 

368 Second skin 

Inspired by body-hugging workout wear, designers create 
glamorous jumpsuits — decorated with sequins and snake prini 

372 Front and center 

A new focus: clothes that bare the midriff 

394 
Woman of character 

Actress Julia Roberts — in evening clothes with lingerie detail: 

400 
Dress lineup 

For spring, the dress is making headlines with feminine detail; 



411-418 
Talking... 

Designer/model look-alikes are partners in chic . . . Andre Leon 
Talley goes couture shopping . . . Parties 

422 
in this issue 

Details, prices, stores, more 

426 
Vogue's last look 

Nineties sneakers shun high tech for high fashion ► 

VOGUE APRIL 1|( 



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SALUTE 10 fl GREAT 
AMERICAN ART EORM: 
IRE RROAOWAY THEATER. 



iingdale's and Ameficaii Expfess present 8 weeks nl hurlybufly 

kullabalon on every floor, in evefy store. Among the highlights: 

le Great White Way" conies to Boulevard four, starring 

Kii leading American designers, in an exclusive collection of 



show-stopping white dresses, just for us. lAnd perfect for the 
Tonys.l "Grand Hotel" glamorously transforms our model rooms on 
5, into a series of suites reserved for a bevy of legeodary stars. 
The dazzling style of Broadway '90 has arrived, in all our stores. 



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BEAUTY & HEALTH 

158 
Beauty clips 

By Shirley Lx)rd 

191-220 
Images 

Joan Juliet Buck on the elements of British 
style. . Julie Logan takes a lesson from 

Eastern European skin-care experts . . . From 
the Paris couture, an update on runway 
hair . . . Beauty answers . . . Hair answers 

222-235 
Fitness 

Dance classes, says Mary Roach, keep the 
mind occupied with culture and tradition while 

the muscles do their thing. 

Vicki Woods explores the depths of endurance 

with diver Angela Bandini. 

Looking great in spring's new short shorts 

takes work, but as Pamela Kaufman reports, 

the payoffs go beyond aesthetics. 

284-290 
Health 

Are children too suggestible as witnesses in 

sexual abuse cases? 

By Carol Tavris, Ph.D. 

Health and fitness notes 

372 
Front and center 

This season's midriff-baring fashions demand a 
w3W-toned torso. Pamela Kaufman reports 

376 
Hands on 

Laura Flynn McCarthy discovers the new 
techniques of today's massage 




FEATURES 

42,46 
Masthead 



50,54 
Contributors 

63 
Talking back: letters from readers 

239 
People are talking about... 

"D-girls" of la la land. . Cabdrivers in 

Gdansk. . .Soft decadence. . .more. 

By Julia Reed 

250 
Photography 

Penn ultimate: Michael Boodro pays tribute to 
the master of the distilled image 



Yasmine and Philippe Arman at home with 
art in their parents' living room, page 382 

254 
Dance 

Choreographer Peter Anastos combines 

conservatism and flamboyance. David Daniel 

probes the contradictions 

261 
Music 

Andrew Lloyd Webber's Aspects of Love is his 

most sophisticated musical yet. Graydon Carter 

finds it may also be his last 

264 
TV 

Filmmaker John Sayles's series. Shannon's 
Deal, has real substance, says Cathleen Schine 



COVER LOOK A modem approach to eve- 
ning — a jumpsuit that's hand-painted and 
sequined; makeup that's soft and pretty — on 
model Christy Turlington. Suit by Christian 
Lacroix Haute Couture Collection. Accesso- 
ries by Christian Lacroix Haute Couture. 
Christian Dior's new Mascara Parfait with 
Cashmere in Black Onyx. Hair, Oribe for 
Oribe at Parachute; makeup, Francois Nors. 
Fashion Editor: Grace Coddington. Photog- 
rapher: Patrick Demarchelier. 



266 
Art 

Actor and director Simon Callow conside 
artistic riches of Theatre on Paper 

272-281 
Books 

John Lahr finds Martin Amis's ingenious! 
novel, London Fields, an act of generoJ 
In four first novels, Jane Smiley locatesi 

rewards — and pitfalls — of idiosyncratic v| 
telling singular tales 

293 
Horoscope 

By Athena Starwoman 

296-304 
Travel 

Quentin Crewe on the Luberon — the se»| 
South of France. 
Inside the Luberon. By Gregory Row| 
Travel News. By Richard Alleman 

306 
Food 

At bistros old and new in Paris, Jeffre 
Steingarten finds great cooking and fan 
chefs — but not always at the same pla^ 

317 
Living 

The latest designs for interiors preser 
increasing evidence of a new gold stand 

348 
Grafs dash 

Steffi Graf — the undisputed queen of wi 

tennis — is shedding her mean-machine in 

to have some fun. Ed Kiersh reports 

378 
There's nothing like a dame 

Though recently honored by her queen 
Margaret Smith remains, Georgina Hov\ 
discovers, the feisty, funny Maggie 

382 
Toying with art 

Their fathers are famed artists; their playr 
resemble galleries. Rachel Urquhart discc 
a very special art world 

390 
Vogue fiction 

An excerpt from Dennis McFarland's n 
novel. The Music Room. The outcome for 
the writer and his book, says Alexandi 
Marshall, is full of promise 

394 
Woman of character 

Sweet southern girl Julia Roberts is play 
Hollywood for all it's worth. Tom Chri; 
pays a visit 

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In a disposable world, is 

there a place f( )r a vase 

desimed to last centuries? 

o 
SomcWaterford patterns available 

today were designed over 200 yeais ago. 

To many, this ability to transcend 
time may seem remarkable. 

lb us, it's simply the criterion that 
determines whether or not a design is 
worthy of the designation " Waterford." 

WAT1:RFC3RD 

Steadfast in a world of wavering s\'?n^-Avi\>< 



With butterflies in mind. 

Choker, bracelet, ear-clips and ring 

in eighteen karat gold with diamonds 

Available at all Tiffany stores. 

To inquire: 800-526-0649. 




Tiffany & Co. 



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lJisc()\('r Ihc ( omradcr.N of bcauly and charni in the Ucs vSainl l-auronl Rive Gauche Spring 
'collection. OfficlalinK the season of Krand slylc: the military jacket of red wool, with notch 
collar and gold buttons. 1.665.00. White silk blouse with black tie, 850.00. Black gabardine 
f)anl, 735.00. 28 Shop® Visit our new > ves Saint Laurent Rive (Jauche Boutique in Chicago. 
Stale Street. 1*1 U8 do the shopping for you! Call our complimentary service: l-800-M-FIHLI)S. 




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Melanie and Don Jqhnson 
Aspen, Colorado 1 



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COLOR. 

ONLY REVLON HA 

UNFORGETTABLE TOUCH. 



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in 60 perfect picks. 9KM 
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Colors that last so long, 
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Every shade of meaning, 
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VERY SAKS FIFTH AVENUE 



THE MOST ASSURED FRINGE BENEFIT FOR NIGHT? BLACK 
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Marisa del Re and Bolero "Cat" Biennale de Sculpture, I 



lb collect art 

was my childhood fantasy. 

To accomplish 

a New YovV gallery on 5T^ Street 

is a dream come true. 

Now, to assemble the finest outdoor 

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I've reached the point 

of Delirium*. ^ 

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CONCORD. 

WATCH 
MAKERS 

To 
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INTRODUCED ON FEBRUARY 12TH. 1979 AS THE THINNEST WATCH IN THE WORLD. 
TODAY CONCORD DELIRIUM* IS THE PERFECT WATCH 



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Estee Lauder Sun gives you 
Special Protection Complex SPC 

Now all our sunscreens are fortified with SPC" 
an exclusive complex that helps prevent damage from: 
burning UVB rays, the more penetrating UVA rays, 
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may cause skin cancer. SPG™ also helps neutralize 
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protects against sunscreen irritation. 

If you like to "tan" without sunning at all. 



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A FABRICATION OF YOUR IMAGINATION 



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Dress by 
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So'-' jy 

Lar ; fotah. 

Shr 5. handbag by 

Stuar- ;e ';:man & Co. 

..vdiiabie at 

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For lips, brows 



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Fashion Tech— the modem way 
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The most unforgettable women in the world wear 

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Use your Macy's charge. Or the American 
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for beautiful skin. 



From Lancome, Paris... 

<;erious sun care. Because today, 

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nous. Because it works. Qinique's 3 product, 3 step method of skin care. Simple, effective, systematic. Use it twice a day. 
Like your toothbrush. Because it's the best thing going for the job. Photographed for Clinique by Irving Penn. 




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Only from Italy. 

Only from Princess Marcella Borghese. 

Terme di Montecatini Spa. 

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The waters of inspiration. 

On the way from Florence to the sea, there is a Spa . . .Terme di 

Montecatini. It is here that the Princess Marcella Borghese and other 

knowing women of the world come to be pampered, and receive the 

natural curative benefits of the waters. 



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Terme di Montecatini 






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Of luxury and necessity. 

In the Tuscan Hills at the Terme di Montecatini Spa, skin is purified, 
activated and restored. Minerals from the waters of the spa are a part of the 
exclusive Acqua di Vita Complex, a precious, potent ingredient in every 

Terme di Montecatini Spa skincare product. 
""^'"''""''' . These beauty treatments virtually reverse the 

visible signs of age on surface skin. 



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\ Crema Saponetta 




'< Clarifying 
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Purify: Crema Saponetta 
Clarifying Cleansing Creme 

Luxurious purification. Crema Saponetta foams up to 
free skin of impurities, then rinses completely to 
improve skins ability to "breathe." The Acqua di Vita 
Complex, botanies, herbs and aromatic essential oils 
soothe, soften and stimulate, leaving skin with the 
tIow of Montecatini. 



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PRINCESS MAKCEI.U j 

n -DORGHESE \ 

t Act ive Mud for Face andBody y 



Activate: Fango 
Active Mud For Face and Body 

The muds of Montecatini are legendarv. 
Ill Fango. skin receives the highest con- 
centration of the Acqua di \ ita Com[)le\. 
Skin is energized, revitalized. Looks and 
feels firmer and healthier u ith renewed 
elasticitv. 








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BoRGHESE 

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Antidote 
For Eyes; 



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RGHESE 



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La Dolce Cura 



Anti-Stress 

•Restorative Facial 

»s-^2L^nsiiive Skin 



Activate: Cura Forte 
Moisture Inteusifier 

-ma Forte, the Acqua di \'ita 
ii[)l(*\ combines with hquid crys- 
louiul iiaturalK in [)lant life. 



ether they inteiisif\ the benefits 
in\ moisturizer worn over it. A 
Itlu. beautiful translueenee takes 
I and skin knows the true meaning 
lonteeatini. 



Restore: Contro Tempo 
Antidote For Eyes 

Contro Tempo pampers the delicate 
area around the eyes w ith the Acqua 
di Vita Complex in a dual action for- 
mula. The gel helps hrm. The cream 
moisturizes. Contro Tempo activates 
for continuous 8 hour beautv benefits. 



Restore: La Dolce Cura 

Anti-Stress Restorative 

Facial Creme For Sensitive Skin 

The solution to skin stressed by the 
environment. La Dolce Cura. enriched 
with a hydrating cushion of soothing 
botanies, herbs and the .^cqua di Vita 
Complex, helps erase the visible signs 
of external stress on surface skin. With 
a web of surface firmers it revives 
fatigued looking skin, helping to 
improve its texture and resiliency. 



Of pampering and of pleasure. 

Princess MarcellaBorghese has brought the natural indulgences 
and healthy pleasires of the Italian Spa Terme di Montecatini to 

America. Visitiny Princess Marcella Borghese counter to 
experience the benefits of Terme di Montecatini and leave the 
stresses of today s/vorld behind — with a free Spa demonstration. 
^ Virtually revenes the visible signs of age on surface skin. 
• Only rom Princess Marcella Borghese. 

r"^ Gto I^RINCESS MARCELLA 




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Exclusively AnnTaylor. 
Summer's essential 
sheath. Shaped and 
brilliantly striped in 
fuchsia/orange on white. 
Rayon/linen. Fully lined. 
Sizes 2 to 12. $130. 





IS YOUR LIFESTYLE 

Available in stores or call 1-800-825-6250. We welcome the AnnTaylor t 




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' The difference between dressed, and well dressy 



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Shoes 

Handbags 

Scarves 

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Neiman Marcus 

Selected Stores 



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HTHF 

"INFUSION" OF 
MOISTURE. 

FOR YOUR 
NECKLINE. 



Germaine Monteil's Infusion Firming Formula 
for Throat and Neckline "holds" fragile skin in a 
continuous moisture embrace, in a lightweight 
gel formula uniquely suited to 
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State-of-the-future formula 
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skin's elasticity and tone, 
retexturizing and revitalizing 
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Protective moisture firmers 
help skin look younger, more 
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reflectors orbit within to help 
skin look more radiant. 

Now your skin has a youth- 
ful "Infusion"^" of beauty. 




MONTEll 



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8ERMAINE MONTE J L 



© 1990 Germaine Montei! tosmetiques Corp. 



Get the point, automatically. 



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ANNA WINTOUR 
Editor in Chief 

Fashion Directors GRACE CODDINGTON, JENNY CAPITAIN Creative Director ANDRE LEON TALLEY 

Managing Editor PRISCILLA FLOOD 

Fashion Editor at Large CARLYNE CERF de DUDZEELE 

Art Director RAUL MARTINEZ Executive Fashion Editor PHYLLIS POSNICK 

Special Projects Editor, Fashion POLLY ALLEN MELLEN 

Fashion 






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Fashion Director, Accessories/Shoes CANDY PRATTS PRICE 

Senior Editors GAIL PINCUS, ELIZABETH SALTZMAN 

Style Editor LAURIE SCHECHTER Fashion Features Editor LESLEY JANE NONKJN 

Booicings Editor PRESTON WESTENBURG Fashion Copy Editor PAGE HILL STARZINGER 

Fashion Associates SUSI BILLINGSLEY, JACQUELIN SPANIEL 

Assistants JONI COHEN, INGE FONTEYNE. ELIZABETH JONES. NATASCHA LOEB, 

KATE REARDON. VICTOIRE REYNAL. TRACY SCANLON 

Fashion Copy Assistants KAREN BRESSLER. SALLY WADYKA 

Paris Bureau Chief SUSAN TRAIN Paris Editor LYSSA HORN Coordinator RONA DaRlN 

West Coast LISA LOVE 

Beauty and Health 

Beauty Director SHIRLEY LORD Health & Fitness Editor MARGARETTA NORTHROP 

Beauty Editor ELIZABETH COLLIER 

Health Assistant PAMELA KAUFMAN Beauty Assistant ELIZABETH BROUS 

Features 

Senior Editors MICHAEL BOODRO. AMICIA DE MOUBRAY. RANDALL KORAL. NANCY NICHOLAS Senior Writer JULIA REED 

Editor at Large TRACY YOUNG Travel Editor RICHARD ALLEMAN 

Features Associates ANNE ALEXANDER. GISELLE BENATAR 

Features Assistant MARK DONEN 

Bookings Editor MAGGIE BUCKLEY Travel Coordinator DESPINA MESSINESl 

Art 

Assistant Art Directors NOEL CLARO. SALVATORE KERNAGHAN 

Features Photo Editor ESIN ILI GOKNAR 

Design Associate EDMUND WINFIELD Assistant LINA MAK 

Assistant to the Art Director MARK GRISCHKE 

Production Manager CHARLOTTE BARNARD Associate JENNIFER HAMILTON ASH 

Art Production Manager PAUL KRAMER Associate AMY VAN BERGEN 

Copy Production Chief MARJORIE HOLT Editors LAURIE DRAKE. DONNA PERKINSON Assistant LAURA WASHINGTON 

Research Editor PHYLLIS RIFIELD Associate MARTHA PICKERILL 

Reader Information SHIRLEY CONNELL 

Editorial Administrative Assistants VIDA GHANI, REGINA MAGUIRE, M\R1A MANOLAS 

Contributing Editors ANNE BASS. ROSAMOND BERNIER. JOAN JULIET BUCK. BART BULL. GRAYDON CARTER. ELEANORE PHILLIPS COLT. 
GABE DOPPELT. TAD FRIEND, CYNTHIA HEIMEL, GEORGINA HOWELL. DODIE KAZANJIAN. STEPHANIE MANSFIELD. 
ANNE McNALLY, PATRICIA DUFF MEDAVOY. WILLL\M NORWICH. JED PERL. JODY SHIELDS. JEFFREY STEINGARTEN. RACHEL URQUHART, VICKI WC| 

Editorial Business Manager WILLL^lM P. RAYNER Associate Business Manager LINDA RICE 

Editorial Advi.sor LEO LERMAN 
Associate Editorial Director ROCHELLE UDELL 

ALEXANDER LIBERMAN 

Editorial Director 



42 



VOGUE APRIL II 



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VERNE WESTERBERG |l 

Publisher I 

BARBARA McKIBBIN Executive Editor NORMAN WATERMAN Associate Publisher I 

- Advertising I 

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Vice President Conde Nast Package NEIL JACOBS I 

Corporate Marketing Director ECKART L. GUTHE I 



46 



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CONTRIBUTORS 

\OGLE 




Joan Juliet Buck 

Contributing editor Joan Juliet Buck is Vogue's consummote observer 
of style. Born in Beverly Hills, she moved to Paris with her parents and 
became a French child dressed in the uniform of the Cours Victor 
Hugo (gray skirt, navy beret). The family moved to London and she 
became a teenager of the sixties (Mary Quant skirts, Vidal Sassoon 
haircut). She studied anthropology at Sarah Lawrence (Indian cot- 
tons, Bendel's jewelry) but dropped out to write book reviews (purple 
bathrobe). She was a fashion assistant at Glamour (ethnic imports, 
diet pills) and returned to London, where she was twice features edi- 
tor of British Vogue (YSL tweed jackets, Jean Muir evening dresses). 

At Women's Wear Daily she was set to writing about clothes, first as 
London correspondent, then in Italy, chronicling the movements of 
Italian ready-to-wear while watching terrorist bombs going off. The 
Italian profusion of detail caused her to try writing fiction. "I have total 
recall of physical details and what was said, but also of subtext. The 
subtext wasn't getting a chance, and the details were choking me." 
She returned to London, married, and wrote her first novel, The Only 
Place to Be; her most recent novel. Daughter of the Swon, was com- 
pleted during a two-year bolt back to Paris. 

A member of the best-dressed list Hall of Fame, she has recently writ- 
ten for Vogue on short hair, on the couture, on French and Italian chic, 
and now in this issue, on British style. "What people wear is as much a 
part of their life as what they are wishing for." contributors ► 54 



50 



V O G I E APRIL 1990 



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CONTRIBUTORS 



\0GIE 




Walter Chin 

"I have a Jamaican mentality: no work, just play," jokes Jamaica-bom 
photographer Walter Chin, whose exuberant "Dress Lineup" ap- 
pears in this issue. The father of three children (Max and Sarah, pic- 
tured here, and baby Naomi), Chin met his wife, Jill Kerzner, fifteen 
years ago while studying art criticism. In 1975, after earning his de- 
gree. Chin decided on his career in an instant: "I saw a Richard Ave- 
don photo of Patti Hansen in Vogue and said, My God, that's what I 
want to do." Like Avedon and Penn, Walter Chin shoots in the studio. 
"The blank wall forces you to focus. There's no faking, because there 
are no distractions to help you — you have to create the interest." 



David Daniel 

David Daniel, who interviewed Peter 
Anastos for this issue and frequently re- 
ports on music and dance for Vogue, 
admits he has "what Cocteau called 
the red-and-gold disease. The only 
cure is seeing the crimson and gilt of 
the opera house and the theater^' — 
which is where Daniel goes almost 
nightly. A conservatory-trained musi- 
cian, Daniel was bom in Alabama and 
educated there before moving to New 
York City to study piano privately. "I'm 
not one of those people who see clas- 
sical music as a pretext for worshiping 
at the tomb of greatness. I simply want 
to be entertained. Of course I look for 
technical brilliance and great person- 
ality, but ultimately I'm looking for 
magic — ^the unique performance that 
cannot be explained." 

54 




VOG I E .APRIL 1990 




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TALKING BACK: letters from readers 



Brain power 

To the Editors: 

As we enter this new decade, Dr. Nancy 
Andreasen's article about psychiatric treat- 
ment programs ("Brave New Brain," Janu- 
ary) comes as a breath of fresh air. After the 
barrage of articles in the past months on 
depression and its treatment — therapy, 
antidepressant drugs, or the combination 
of both — she hits the mark, citing the in- 
formed patient as the most important factor 
in the treatment of depression today. 

Some doctors, touting the new "wonder 
drug" Prozac, would like you to believe 
that it will solve the world's depression. Dr. 
Andreasen explains the importance of psy- 
chiatry in the treatment of depression as a 
twofold approach of "supportive psycho- 
therapy" with medication. I am one of 
those fortunate patients who have a thera- 
pist with both "a brain and a heart," and the 
choice he gave me was the major turning 
point in the treatment of my clinical depres- 
sion. I commend your presentation of this 
article and hope others find help in the fu- 
ture through choosing to educate them- 
selves in their own treatment of depression. 
Michele Weston 
New York, NY 

To the Editors: 

I read your article "Brave New Brain" 
and would like to point out a shortcoming 
inherent in the gene-mopping and brain- 
scanning versions of behavioral science. 
The living brain is a social animal, regulated 
not within the confines of the skull but within 
relationships to the species. I predict that 
the frontiers of knowledge lie in the direc- 
tion of understanding the ways in which the 
structure and functioning of relationships 
determine the functioning of systems be- 
neath the skin. 

When humans are understood as part of 
the fabric of life within the realm of the nat- 
ural sciences, perhaps we will be able to be 
a more responsible species. There is noth- 
ing wrong with technology nor the article 
you published. Technology will, I predict, 
follow shifts in theory and thinking. 

Victoria Harrison 

President/Director 

Family Health Services, Inc. 

Baltimore, MD 

To the Editors: 

Must we lose our minds attempting to un- 
derstand our brain? Dr. Andreasen's article 
presents a misleading view of the future of 
psychiatry. Psychiatrists need to be trained 
not only in brain biology but also in the dy- 
namics of human interaction. As we face 
exciting new technological discoveries, 
let's not forget that the human experience 
of mental illness takes place in the world of 
relationships, and that psychiatrists must be 
able to think in terms of defense mecha- 
nisms and personal style as well as in terms 
of neurotransmitters. 

Laurie Rosenblatt, M.D. 

Massachusetts Mental Health Center 

Harvard University 

Boston, MA 



Life after LaGuardia 

To the Editors: 

Paul Taylor's article on Tim Rollins and his 
Kids of Survival ("Bronx Revival," January) 
quotes Kate Pierson as saying Tim is really 
upset when one of his kids drops out of 
school. 

He must be doubly upset when two do. 
George Garces and Richard Cruz walked 
away from the opportunity to earn a high 
school diploma at the most prestigious art 
school in the country when they dropped 
out of LaGuardia. 

Could the lure of fame and fortune hove 
hod on influence that drew them away 
from education in the straight path? K.O.S. 
is not an absolute wonder! 

Sheila Stember 

Chairperson, Art Department 

Fiorello H. LaGuardia High School 

of the Arts 

New York, NY 

Tim Rollins responds: 

In education, as in art, the proof of the 
pudding is in the eating. I'll compare my 
work with K.O.S., now on view at the Dia Art 
Foundation, the Wadsworth Atheneum, 
and the Museum of Modern Art, to the stu- 
dent work produced by Stember's depart- 
ment anytime. 

I was very disappointed when both Richie 
and George left LaGuardia. When George 
refused to return to school, he was expelled 
from K.O.S. My rules about the kids being 
and staying in school are clear and firm. 

Richard Cruz responds: 

It surprises me that Sheila Stember would 
write that I dropped out of high school 
when, in fact, it was the guidance counselor 
of LaGuardia High, Frederic Wile, who 
clearly told me that I had too many credits to 
make up and not enough time to finish them. 
But I never dropped out. Instead, I trans- 
ferred to Columbus High in the Bronx. I 
couldn't just drop out of K.O.S. and concen- 
trate strictly on school, because I like what 
I'm learning with Tim Rollins and I was sup- 
porting my mother with my K.O.S. earnings 
and paying all our bills. I needed K.O.S. 
badly. 



Teed off 

To the Editors: 

I read Page Hill Storzinger's item on golf 
fashion and Ralph Lauren ("Fashion Clips," 
January) and would like to clarify a mis- 
conception. Because younger men and 
women have been taking up the sport in re- 
cord numbers, the golf apparel industry has 
responded with new and exciting sports- 
wear. The image of "dowdy golf clothes" 
was sent out to pasture years ago. Though 
Ralph Lauren has designed a wonderful 
collection, he was not the trendsetter in golf 
fashions. Golf designers have been offer- 
ing beautifully designed sportswear in nat- 
ural fabrics, inspired by the colors and 
trends of skiwear and streetweor, for a 
number of years. Golf clothes are witty. 



stylish, well made, and not just for the golf 
course. 

Eileen Rafferty Broderick 

Fashion Editor 

Golf Digest, 

Golf Shop Operations, 

Golf World 

Page Hill Staninger responds: 

I think we've come to similar conclusions. I 
was merely pointing out that name design- 
ers are moving into golf fashions. I believe 
that Ralph Lauren is one of the most sophi's- 
ticated and well known "names" to do so, 
and therefore represents a new level of in- 
terest in the subject. 



On location 

To the Editors: 

I am an ardent fan of your new-look 
VOGUE. My only complaint is with your 
January layout entitled "The New Lineup," 
featuring boldly striped resort wear pho- 
tographed by Tiziono Mogni. Bermuda 
was not mentioned at all as the location for 
this particular shoot. Because you advo- 
cate lifestyle as well as fashion, I think your 
pragmatic, globe-trotting readers should 
know the names of your fashion-shoot lo- 
cations, especially the pretty-in-pink ones 
like Bermuda. 

Eugene De Couto 
Southampton, Bermuda 



Lifesaver 

To the Editors: 

I would like to thank VOGUE for literally 
saving my life. A few years ago, I got in- 
volved with what might be called "the 
wrong crowd." Almost overnight, I was 
transformed into a totally different person. I 
cut my long, curiy brown hair into a mo- 
hawk. Drugs became more and more a 
port of my life, and I was living on the 
streets. One day I happened upon an issue 
of VOGUE. The models were all so beauti- 
ful and healthy, and there I was with my 
hair sticking ten feet up in the air. I suddenly 
realized that this wasn't really what I want- 
ed to be. But I would never be able to af- 
ford to dress like those models by standing 
on the corner saying, "Spore some 
change?" 

If I hadn't seen your magazine that day, I 
don't know what would have happened to 
me. I want to thank you for helping me save 
myself. I'm beginning to regain the life I 
never should have lost in the first place. 

Isabella Brigetta Gingersley 
Toronto, Ontario 



VOGUE welcomes letters from its readers. 
Address all correspondence to letters, 
VOGUE Magazine, 350 Madison Avenue, 
New York, NY 10017. Please include a 
daytime telephone number. Letters may be 
edited for length or clarity. • 



\ OG I E Al' R I 1. 1990 



63 



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E L LE N TRAC 



A R 



THE ART OF 
PERFORMANCE 




Susan Jaffe as Odette in Swan Lake 

1990 marks the 50th Anniversary of one of the 
world's preeminent dance companies: American 
Ballet Theatre. Its first half-century was highlighted 
by performances by the most accomplished names 
in ballet. The 1990 season features many of the 
time-honored classics of the company's repertoire 
since 1940... ballets that have established American 
Ballet Theatre's renown. 

The Movado Watch Corporation, maker of the 
Movado Museum Watch, is proud of both its long 
term commitment to the arts and its role as a princi- 
pal benefactor of American Ballet Theatre. 




From the Movado Museum Watch Collection, 
the Sports Edition (SE) Watch with diamond bezel. $1,995. 

MOVADO. 

The Museum^Watch. 

The MovixJo Museum ciial is a registered trademark of The Movado Watch Corporation. 



IE APRIL 1990 



65 




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"Minerals " theme: silk crepe 
georgette shorts, $875. 100% silk 
scarf blouses, from $995 - $1,295. 
"Banyoles " espadrilles in natural 
horsehair, $175. 

Avaiiable exclusively at Hermes Stores: 

Beverly Hills , Rodeo Drive. 

Boston , The Heritage on the Garden. 

Chicago , The Hermes Boutique at Bonwit Teller. 

Opening this spring, Hermes on Oak Street 

Dallas , Highland Park Village. 

Honolulu . The Royal Hawaiian Shopping Center. 

Houston , The Pavilion on Post Oak. 

New York, 11 East 57th Street 

Palm Beach , Worth Avenue. 

San Francisco , One Union Square. 

Boutiques du Monde d'Hermes : 

Baltimore , Nan Duskin. 

Manhasset , The Americana. 

New York , Barneys New York. 

Palo Alto , 1. Magnin. 

Philadelphia , Nan Duskin. 

Seattle , I. Magnin. 

Short Hills, N.J. , Barneys New York. 

Available in Ontario. 

Visit the Hermes Boutique closest to you 

or caU (800) 441-4438, exL 202. 



19 9 

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Poetry in motion. An ode to the timeless beauty of woman, from Diane Freis. 
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LASSIC FRAC3R 



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"A friend of mine says she 
better luck in choosing 
lingerie than in choosing her 
ner companions. 

"Perhaps there's just a better 
xtion of lingerie out there. " 



Waidcnform offers women over 1^0 ways to 
'ress themselves. Obviously people are listening. 



FASHION CLIPS 



By Page Hill Starzinger 




Hats now are big and bold. ABOVE, by 

Christian Lacroix. RIGHT, by Patricia 

Underwood for Gordon Henderson. 



Batiks. . .Cropped tops 

Cut into sophisticated shapes — 
such as neat fitted dresses and 
jackets — and in washed silk as well 
as cotton, batik moves from a 
"beach" print to a fashion pat- 
tern . Even Michael Kors and Cal- 
vin Klein, who usually choose 
solids, are going for South Sea 
swirls. . . .The hot-weather top: 
cropped, exposing the midriff. 
Now it's an integral part of an out- 
fit instead of an irreverent extra 
item a la Madonna. At Complice, 
cropped shirts match the suits. 



Straws in the 
wind 

Runway hats are usual- 
ly highly theatrical and 
meant only as show- 
stoppers, but this sea- 
son there ore low-key 
versions that work in 
real life. They're over- 
size, lighthearted. 
. . .Other noteworthy 
accessories come from 
a new name — Marie 
Mercie. Catch her min- 
iature straw totes that 
work as handbags 
and her spoof on sun- 
glasses worn as hair 
bands — these are in 
straw and hove mesh 
where lenses would be. 





The spring couture suit is rounded,] 
less aggressive, and the shape is 
emphasized by graphic blocks of 
color or of white. Ungaro's are thej 
brightest: black jackets outlined in] 
candy pink. Chanel's style, above. 



People are talking about: a more refined approach to denim 

When buyers went backstage at Issey Miyake's show to look at a pair of jear 
style shorts, they discovered the fabric wasn't denim, it was stretch polye 
ter. Other highly refined jeans are made of denim; in lightweight formula 
and elegant colors, they have a dressy European sensibility. The standouts 
for the city, white at Ferragamo; for the country, stripes at Benetton. 



Great finds: bright slippers, summer dresses 

With summer come lower prices, and this season there are some 

great buys. Look for Audrey Hepburn dresses (in navy with 

white polka dots) for $48 at Esprit. Dressy cotton knit T-shirts 

come in celery or oyster for $78 at J. Crew. Basco turns out 

short-sleeved, wide-necked Gili-esque tops in deep cinnamon for 

$64. . . .The best casual clothes for a vacation in the sun? 

Gordon Henderson's. The colors: pale and cool looking— stone. 

sky blue. The shapes: skin-revealing and perfectly proportioned. 

A popular look: midriff-tied linen shirt, long pull-on skirts. 

86 




The shol 

summer— I 

Libby's C f 

style flats 

only $36. C| 

last pages. 



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Bring on the night. Cotton goes 
city sophisticated in this over- 
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cotton by Cherokee, this page. 

Wistful thinking. Reflections of 

the past in an ornamental button 

front, black textured-knit sweater, 

in cotton by Cherokee, opposite 

page. Fine cotton clothing 

available at Macy's. 





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ACCESSORIES 



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BASS COMFORT FOOTWEAR. 
WHAT EVERY SNEAKER WISHES IT COULD BE. 

With all due respect to the sneaker, Bass Comfort 
Footwear™ goes further to make you as comfortable 
about the way you look as you are about the way you feel. 

Our desire to raise your comfort level has resulted 
in a shoe that can travel far and wide with its enormous 
styling versatility and exclusive Bass®comfort system. 

From the moment you slip them on, your feet won't believe your 
eyes. Under this confident exterior an ultra-soft leather sockliner nur- 
tures your sole, while a cushy foam innersole lends extra support no 
matter what path you happen to take. 

But that's not all. A flex-front midsole and a guardian 
polyurethane sole give you the freedom to tread wherever you'd take 
a sneaker. And you can count on the Bass spring-return 
EVA comfort wedge to back you up every step of the way. 

Any sneaker can make you comfortable. Bass 
Comfort Footwear can make you comfortable not 
only on your journey, but upon your arrival. 





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VIEW 

Editor: Laurie Schechter 



H 



lew inspirations 

For the first couture collections of the decade, 
designers looked to surprising sources. Andre Leon Talley reports 




Christian Lacroix re-creates the line of a dress in a 17th-century Zurbardn portrait. 



THE PARIS COUTURE ENTERED THE NEW DECADE PLAY- 
ing on inspirations as diverse as the skyline of Chicago, 
the fantasies of Louis XV 's court, modem and old- 
master painters, Marilyn Monroe and Jackie O. 

After the third year on his own. Christian Lacroix 
launched his first fragrance, C'est la vie! and created a 

VOGUE A I' K 1 I. 1990 



collection based on sources that have intrigued him 
since childhood. Dresses were inspired by the famous 
shade of pink known as rose de Paris, his finale wed- 
ding gown by a maja of Goya, and his printed one- 
piece leotards by Emilio Pucci's dolce vita style. For 
grand entrance — or exit — makers, Lacroix lift- ► 104 

101 



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Photography Toscani 



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ed one long evening dress from one of 
his favorite old masters, the Spanish 
painter Zurbaran. 

Gianni Versace, shov^'ing for the first time in 
Paris, created a collection ideal for his world of 
pop and rock icons. But he also cited as inspira- 
tion such famous women of Pans as Kiki of 
Montparnasse, Josephine Baker, and Colette 
and showed beautiful short dresses based on the 

104 



J»^^ 



1 . Sonia Detaunay's futuristic color 
blends reappear on a dress by Ateli 
Versace (2). 3. Karl Lagerfeld uses a 
portrait by Jacques-Louis David^(4) I 
design a Chanel Empire-style gowr 
Details, lost pages. 

colors and forms of 
Sonia Delaunay. 

Emanuel Ungaro, 
who had recently 
made a business 
trip to Chicago, 
was so impressed 
by the city's skyline 
that he made graph- 
ic four-color suits 
that recalled for him 
the city's modern 
glamour. Rampant 
throughout Valen- 
tino's third Paris cou- 
ture show was the 
influence, for day and 
evening, of Jackie 
Kennedy Onassis. Va- 
lentino's soft, ^106 

V()(, i: E A 1' K 1 1. 1 99U 




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Ala IVIoana Onter, 1450 Ala Moana Blvd., Honolulu 
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E APRIL 199 



105 



VIEWl new inspirations 

1. Jackie Kennedy's look from the sixties sets the tone for 

a Valentino silk suit (2). 3. Yves Saint Laurent's homage 

to Marilyn Monroe: a lace 

dress and fox bolero (4j. 

5. A costume from the Ballets 

des Champs-Elysees inspires 

Yves Saint Laurent's tulle 

dress (6). Details, last pages. 




#ll# 




elongated day suit brought back the era when she chose 
his tailored coats by day, his romantic, fluid chiffon or- 
ganza dresses by night. 

For his second couture collection for the House of 
Dior, Gianfranco Ferre said he wanted to achieve the 
beauty of a curtain blowing in a breeze. It is doubtful, 
however, that his strapless dresses with trains will ever 
be ordered even by the European women who love to 
wear ball gowns for black-tie dinners in grand country 
castles. The Dior trains derailed even on the runway, as 
models tripped up in them or they dangled heavi- 

106 



ly off the runway and almost 
the laps of front-row viewers. 
For Chanel, Karl Lager- 
feld wanted a sharp, graphic 
line by day. He came up with the 
suitdress, a curvier version of the 
classic coatdress. In all his jackets he re- 
duced the shoulders, the way Mademoiselle Cha- 
nel loved them . While his may be the briefest ► 1 1 4 ' 



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Just beyond Mr. McGregor's garden gate lies the enchanted world 
of Peter Rabbit. A place where the grass is always green and the lettuce delicious. 

A place of timeless magic, now captured in our Beatrix Potter collection. ^ 

Shown, children's playwear by Peter Rabbit & Friends; animals, accessories and ll ll 1^ il ^ I I III 

books from Eden. In Children's Apparel. Waihington/Oregon/Califomia/Utah/Alaska/Virginia ^H^^^i^^^^^^MBi^^^^^^*^^^^^^ 



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VIEWl new Inspirations 



hemlines of the couture, Lagerfeld says, "peo- 
ple who talk about too short or too long are bor- 
ing and banal. We have more interesting things 
to discuss these days, one hopes." 

The leg-revealing long and floaty look for 
evening was inspired by the current rage for the 
Jacques-Louis David exhibit at the Louvre. But 
Lagerfeld didn't have to race off to the muse- 
um. He simply had to swing open a gilded door 
and glance toward his own neo-Grec David or 
the large painting by Vouet in his dining room. 
In the first Yves Saint Laurent couture col- 
lection of the decade, 
the designer found in- 
spiration in his youth. 
A crisp, single-breast- 



'*•'. 




1. Yves Saint 

Laurent's graphic 

suit evokes the 

impeccable style 

of Coco Chanel (2). 

3. For evening, 

Yves Saint Laurent 

updates the look 

of the ladies at 

Versailles (4), \ 

giving his silk 

dress leg-baring 

shortness, a daring 

decolletage. 

Details, last pages. 



ed wool suit 
edged in white, 
with the signa- 
ture overscale 
buttons on the 
sleeves, arrived 
on the runway 
announced by 
culture impresa- 
rio Pierre Berge 
as ' 'Hommage a 
Mademoiselle 
Chanel." This 
signaled a series 
of tributes — to 
Marilyn Monroe 
(a short, strap- 



less white lace dress with a movie-star decolletage), Catherine 
Deneuve, Maria Callas, Silvana Mangano, and others. 

A fascination with the court dances and ballets of Louis XV 
led the designer to make dresses as light as bubbles. "I wanted 
the dresses to be as airy, as light as the feathers the mannequins 
had on their hats or in their hands," observed a thirty-pounds- 
thinner YSL. ' 'These have nothing inside, none of that construc- 
tion of the fifties where dresses were like little buildings inside. 
This kind of technique comes only after years of experiment, and 
I couldn't do it without my atelier. " ' • VIEW ► 126 



114 



\ ()C. L E APRIL 1 9') II 



PORTRAIT OF A DESIGNER AND HEft WORK 



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hitira Ashlex 1990 



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Spring C o llection i990 




othing can replace 
your favorite shampoo. 

But something can 
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There's a reason your favorite 
shampoo became your favorite. 
Maybe it was the way it made 
your hair feel. Or how it gave 
your hair body. 

Unfortunately even the best 
shampoos can stop working, 
because over time they leave 
a residue build-up that makes 
your hair dull and lifeless. 

Don't give up on it, though. 
Just use Neutrogena' Shampoo 
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It gently removes the build- 
up that other shampoos leave 
behind. So all you're left with 
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"This fragrance is my effort to synthesize all that the most 
beautiful women in my long career did for me. It is a 
tribute to their beauty and their charm'.' 





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)Gl'E APRIL 1990 



123 




CRABTREE & EVELYN 

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"I always wear jeuns, " 

Sofia Coppola says. 

"But I like to mix them 

with unexpected 

things — like a Chane 

jacket." 1. Her 

trademark ripped Levi's 

paired with a jacket by 

Moschino Couture 

Leather. 2. With her 

father, Francis Ford 

Coppola. 3. Sofia's 

knack? For pairing 

even the sublime with 

everyday basics. Isaac 

Mizrahi shirt, Elizabeth 

Marcel hat. Details, 

last pages. 



Addicted to Chanel, long 
hair, and worn jeans, 
Sofia Coppola is the 

ultimate in Cal-Ital style. 

STEPHANIE MANSFIELD reportS 

ONLY THE OVERINDULGED TEENAGE DAUGHTER OF A 
famous American movie director could charm her way 
through an internship at the prestigious House of Cha- 
nel wearing little knit jackets with torn jeans, probably 
thinking haute couture was the name of a rock group. 
"I was expecting really uptight old ladies," recalls 



eighteen-year-old Sofia Coppola. "So I 
was really scared when I went in. But 
they are really young and really nice. I 
don't speak French and they don't speak 
English. Right before the collection it 
would be really hectic and they'd be yell- 
ing at me in French. I'd just smile be- 
cause I didn't know what they were 
talking about." 

It's not hard to understand why Chanel 
loved Sofia Coppola. She's the quintes- 
sential Cal-Ital: waist-length burnt sienna 
hair, prominent Mediterranean nose ("It 
was broken in junior high playing ball"), 
turquoise toenail polish, and a penchant for Romeo 
Gigli, leather jackets, convertible cars, and homemade 
Coppola Napa Valley wine mixed with Orangina. 

The youngest child of Francis Ford Coppola, Sofia 
made her film debut as an infant in The Godfather, then 
went on to appear in several of her father's films (Rum- 
ble Fish, The Outsiders). She often felt self-conscious 
about her looks. In her most memorable role, as Kath- 
leen Turner's younger sister, Nancy, in Peggy Sue Got 
Married, she played a pony tailed geek. "I want to bum 
all the copies." Several months ago, while visiting her 
father in Rome on the set of the third Godfather, Sofia 
was tapped for the role of Michael Corleone's teenage 
daughter after actress Winona Ryder abruptly pulled 
out of the project. 

But her first love is working behind the camera as a 
costume designer. "You can go to work with ^130 



126 



VOGUE .APRIL 1990 



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PAINTINGS 
March 26-April 12,1990 




GALLERY 



UllBAn 



500 Park Avenue on 59th Street New York 
NY 10022 U.S.A. Tel..2 12-593-3306 

The Gallery is open: 

Monday to Friday: 

10 A.M. to 6 P.M. 



VIEWl Sofia Coppola 



bags under your eyes," she explains. The Chanel influence was 
evident in her costumes for "Life Without Zoe," a short Cop- 
pola production that made up one part of the film New York Sto- 
ries. She also had a iiand in the script, which was originally 
written by FFC (as he is known around the house) as a vehicle for 
Sofia. The adventures of Zoe, a modem-day Eloise, were based 
on experiences Sofia had in New York during the filming of The 
Cotton Club. 

The reviews of "Life Without Zoe" were negative. One even 
suggested it was a cinematic attempt on Sofia's part to work out 
her relationship with her famous father. "I had all these night- 
mares at the time about people judging me," she says. Yes, she 
is spoiled ," in that I have a lot of things , but I appreciate them . ' ' 

Sofia was bom a gypsy. When Francis Coppola made a film, 
the entire family went on location. Her earliest memory is the 
making oi Apocalypse Now in the Philippines. "My dad would 
take a helicopter to work every moming over the jungles. " Her 
closest friends were her brothers, Roman 
and Gio, the latter of whom was killed in a 
boating accident during the making of Gar- 
dens of Stone. Gio was Sofia's surrogate 
parent. "I wasn't close to my mother for a 
while because she was traveling and kind of 
having a midlife crisis. I don't blame her 
now, but I was angry because I felt my parents 
were off. My parents were definitely cra- 
zy," she says, laughing. "So my brothers 
and I had to have each other. I don't know 
what I would have done without them. ' ' 

She and Roman are executives of Com- 
mercial Pictures, formed to give first-time 
directors a shot at low-budget, commercial 
pictures. Their most recent venture. The 
Spirit of '76, wrapped last summer. It's a 
send-up of the Saturday Night Fever set, and 
Sofia did the costumes. "I'm sooo sick of 
polyester," she whines, twisting her seven- 
ties mood ring, a souvenir from her endless 
foraging for wide-collared shirts , disco boots , and other artifacts 
from the ' 'decade that taste forgot. ' ' 

It's a far cry from her usual forays, shopping for size-four Az- 
zedine Alaias and "OD'ing on Chanel." Somehow, academics 
got lost in the shuffle. "The way I paid for it was I couldn't get 
into a lot of colleges that I would have loved to go to. ' ' She grad- 
uated last year from St. Helena High School, down the road from 
her family's sprawling Victorian estate, complete with pool and 
trampoline, in the Napa Valley. 

She has been invited back to Chanel, but, for now, has taken a 
semester off from a small college near home to work on the God- 
father. She also doesn't consider herself a great beauty. "Some- 
times I'm comfortable with the way I look." But when she 
strides through a crowd of actors standing by the door to the stu- 
dio set the next day, wearing her uniform of T-shirt, leather jack- 
et, over^iz.^ man's Rolex watch, and torn jeans, her skin the 
color of zabaglione and her hair of burnished gold, she looks ev- 
ery bit the hip young goddess. "The next thing my father's going 
to make," she says in vintage Sofia, "is a champagne and name 
it after me for my twenty-first birthday. ' ' • 




With niece Gia. Agnes B. bN 
Romeo Gigli pants. Rolex 



130 



VOGUE APRIL 1990 




Art and Design. 



e Couture - 88, rue du faubourg Saint-Honore - PARIS 
Boutique - 3 West - 56th Street - NEW YORK. 



iGUE APRIL 1990 



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BY ISAAC MANEVITZ 



I. MAGNIN 




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NEIMAN MARCUS 



SAKS FIFTH AVENUE 



OLE APRIL 1990 



139 






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MAX FACTOR 

Shade shown is Refined Rose © 1989 Max Factor & Co Available in CanaOa 






ELEMENTS 

Editor: Candy Pratts Price 

The raw, unpolished jewelry created by designer 
Mercedes Robirosa proves there is life after Chanel 




1 . After four years with 
Karl Lagerfeld, Mercedes 
Robirosa is on her own. 

2. Bracelets and 
necklaces hove 
unfinished edges, "as if 
time and the sea had 
passed on top." 

3. Robirosa borrows 
from marine life, creating 
starfish earrings, a purse 
with a handle of waves 
and shells. 4. On a straw 
hat, a metal "fence" 
replaces the usual fabric 
band. Details, last pages. 

WHEN ACCESSORY DESIGNER MERCEDES 
Robirosa stuffed her dark curls under a foot- 
tall Madame de Pompadour wig for a job in- 
terview with Karl Lagerfeld, she had no idea 
how successful it would be. "I didn't realize 
how much Karl loved anything eighteenth 
century," says the thirty-seven-year-old Ar- 
gentinean. Lagerfeld was so intrigued he 
made a sketch of her and hired her on the spot 
to oversee all of Chanel's accessory collec- 
tions. Four years later, Robirosa decided to 
set up a workshop of her own in her Paris town 
house. "I wanted to move on from the pol- 
ished, classic style of Chanel to something 
much more raw, unfinished, sauvage." One 
of her earliest collections. Treasures of the 
Conquistadors, showed necklaces made from 
gold-plated nuggets sprouting imitation ru- 
bies, sapphires, coins, pearls. The look: "As 
if time and the sea had passed on top." Last 
summer's theme, Gifts of the Sea Goddess, re- 
vealed her fondness for fantasy and nature, culled 
from a childhood of reading Jules Verne at the 
dinner table and walking by the river near her 
uenos Aires home. This spring's collection 
shows Robirosa's affinity for natural ma- 
terials, unusual textures. Instead of 
the traditional fabric band, a 
straw hat is ringed with a 
gold-plated bronze 
"fence"; a bronze bracelet 
is shaped like a swath of 
fisherman's netting. 
Pearls are made to look as if 
they've been rolled in sand. 
People want objects with a history," 
she says, "as if they're treasures they've 
found themselves. ' ' — krysia burnham 



142 



VOGl'E APRIL 1990 



^•^ 




For store listing see page 50 




•4 4 





^^^^ 




^',,.^^ 



SABEL 

OT1O0S 

i6, Avenue Montaigne Paris 

74?, Madison Avenue New York 
Calle de Hermosilla 29, Madrid 



i 




What CAN TOP THE 

COMFORT OF YOUR FAVORITE lEANS? 

Russell Athletic T-shirts. 
Slip into something more comfortable. 

evMca 

P TEMi 

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vH WMM w»rv. - WKn.1 



ATHLETIC w*L T332 ^«K]c ' 



For//}e retailer nearest you, call 1.800.526.5256. In New Jersey. 1.800.624.0470. 



146 



VOGUE APRIL 1 



nv *ndre*» Jergens Company 



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« mtroducmg 
the first caibona) 



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Wh\- carlxjnated? For the same reason legendary spas were built 
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When the tiny bubbles stop, >'Our spa bath is blue, fragrant, carbonated, 
and ready to soothe the inside, smooth the outside. 



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Isn't your body ready? 



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TNESS ■¥ 

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USTI\C SOFTNESS FOR 
DRY SKIN 



Avdiu-Me in scented and unscented. 



Softness that lasts, even after a 
handwashing. That's really important 
to pediatrician Dr. Paule Couture, 
because she washes her hands 
throughout the day. 

But she still needs them to be silky 
soft. That's why she uses Eversoft 
from Jergens, the unique lotion that 
won't wash off the next time she 
washes up. Eversoft moisturizes and 
helps heal dry skin, leaving a silky 
softness that lasts. Yet it's not greasy. 
So her hands feel just the way her 
patients like them. 

And just the way you'd like your 
hands to feel. 

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Oive a man a fish 
and you feed him for a day. 




leach him how to fish 
and you feed him for life. 

It's a concept as time-honored as it is timely. 
Yet most foreign aid programs continue to provide short term 

answers, rather than long term solutions. The only 

food that lasts a lifetime, is knowledge. The kind of knowledge 

we at Technoserve have been supplying to farmers 

from Africa to Latin America, for the last twenty years. We've taught 

tens of thousands of needy men and women how to 

run agricultural enterprises that produce food 

and income, ultimately producing that most precious of 

commodities: self-reliance. We've accomplished 

so much, but we still have so far to go. For us to teach, 

please, we need you to help. 



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Indulge in Bain de Soleil, in SPF's up to 30, 
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BEAUTIFUL COLOR TODAY 
BEAUTIFUL SKIN TOMORROW 



,. »!fiii#*k»"r?'»- 



Most sunglasses can help you 
create a certain image. But one 
look through a pair of Serengeti 
Drivers and you'll notice a 
remarkable difference in the way 
you're able to see. 

The difference starts with 
Drivers' unique, patented photo- 
cromic lenses. They adjust 
continuously to changing light con- 
ditions, so your eyes feel less strain. 



All it takes is one look. 

And their Spectral ControP 
Filters reduce glare and filter haze 
for enhanced contrast and sharper 
vision, while they cut 99% of the 
sun's ultraviolet rays. 

Their quality ground and 
polished glass lenses prevent 
distortion as well, leaving you with 
the clearest visibility possible. 

But don't think that all of this 
engineering means you have to 



sacrifice style or comfort. Becai 
Corning Optics put as much 
thought in the design of their 
fi^ames as they do in their lenses^l 
So you get the best combinatioi 
of quality and performance. 

Try a pair of Serengeti Driv<| 
And see what you've been missil 

Call for more information 
1-800-525-4001. 



isimuialed demon! 



i 



(withoul sunglasses! 



1990 Coming Incorporaled NY 14831 



SERENGETI 

DRIVERS 



(with Serengeti 






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Imagine the melding of modern technolog 
and old-world craftsmanship. Envision th 
blending of hand-loomed beauty and high 
performance fibers. At La Peria, the very bes 
in women's lingerie reflects the pride of both ol 
and new. Here, La PerIa presents the Plumeti 
collection... pieces of sheer elegance created t 
make a woman feel beautiful f r o m within, 
remarkable new stretch tulle is the foundatio 
deliciously soft, incredibly light. Fin 
needlework, exquisitely detailed, enhance 
the delicate texture. Opulent lace inlays furthe 
set off the flattering lines of each of La PerIa' 
Plumetis designs. Picture yourself in these indu 
gent essentials. Cater to your heart's desire fo| 
feminine luxury... with lingerie from La Perl 



L/V PERL 



PARIS 



LONDON 



ROMA 



154 



T O K Y 



VOGUE APRIL 19 5l 




HARLES"JOURDAN 



C) 



Pari 




Bal Harbour Beverly Hills Dallas Chicago ^^^^V Houston 

rk Palm Beach San Francisco Short Hills South Coast Plaza Souths 



m 



BEAUTY CLIPS 

By Shirley Lord 

Inhale for jet lag 

Aromatherapy as a treatment for jet lag is apparently nothing to sniff 
at. After Flight Regulator essences to beat jet log ore now provided at 
some of London's hotels and lost month went on sale at the duty-free 
shop in Heathrow Airport's international terminal. They are available 
here by mail order. Plant and aroma authority Daniele Ryman spent 
twenty years studying the therapeutic benefits of extracts before de- 
veloping the essences, which are meant to be inhaled A.AA. — to keep 
you alert — and PM., to help induce sleep. On the medical basis that it 
takes a day for the body's circadian rhythms to readjust for every time 
zone crossed, Ryman's two potions, each a fragrant mix of twelve es- 
sential oils, are said to take three days to work effectively. 

More safety with color 

Color is the motivating message 
behind a spectacular new range of 
sunglasses from Revo, tfie comp>any 
that five years ago adapted the 
thin-film coating processes used in 
outer space to develop the first 
sunglasses that block out harmful 
ultraviolet, infrared, and shortwave 
blue light. Now research has 
revealed that while dark shields 
may be fun to hide behind, they 
don't necessarily provide the best 

^ protection against the sun. 
Certain brilliantly colored 
iridescent lenses can act like 
SPF 100 for the eyes; for some 
people, each color also offers 
a subtle benefit. Revo's vivid 
blue lenses are best for 
increasing contrast in flat or 
hazy light; orange lenses cut 
nfrared glare at high altitudes 
and on beaches; violet lenses do 
both these things; and sharp green 
lenses are the best for brightening 
a scene. Because sunglasses 
claims are similar, many Revo 
dealers are offering a "test drive" 
program to enable customers 
to let their eyes decide which 
ir works best for them. 



yV 




Long-hair 
standout: model 
Michaela Bercu 




Bucking the short-hair trend 

There's an unusual salon in New York City, a welt 

guarded secret among women who not only buck ti 

trend toward short hair but who actively want to gr 

their hair or keep it long, often extra long — like 

Crystal Gale and Liv Ullman. It's George Michael 

place on Madison Avenue, which bills itself as tht 

long-hair center of the world, where trims are takt 

standing up — on dry hair to preclude stretching o, 

breaking — and where blow-dryers, curling irons, at 

hot rollers are forbidden. New. specially designed U 

watt dryers are ' 'like hospitals for the hair, ' ' says Mi( 

with computers that monitor possible moisture loss 

the resultant lack of shine. "When hair looks like si 

it is a woman's most beautiful accessory," he say: 



Violet lenses cut infrared glare 
and increase contrast. 



There seems to be no end to 

ingenuity when it comes to 

products bearing designer labels. 

"Designer fruit" is the latest: 
papayas with an Oscar de la Renta 
label are being sold here— they're 
from his Dominican Republic farm. 

158 



Not just kid stuff 

The beauty consumer is getting 
younger and younger. F.A.O. 
Schwarz is busy selling fra- 
grances for children (Parfums 
Givenchy's Ptisenbon among 
them); Carita sends out press 
pictures of the look for five-year- 
olds this spring, right. Help! This 
month, one useful development: 
Clinique counters around the 
country will feature '^ Happy Sun 
Days for Clinique Kids," a free book- 
let explaining why sun protection for 
children is essential. Most sun damage 
to skin Is caused by sun exposure before 
the age of eighteen. 



I celebrate! 



Oil of Olay 

for sensitive skin. 

The white , 

hypo-allergenic 

fragrance- 

I £X^w6 completely 
compatible 
replenishment for your 

sensitive skin": 



/ 



/ 



u 




Why grow old gracefully? Fight it . 



n 





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e 






Jungle Lace: Exotic. Untamed. 
Opulent jade with brilliant purple. 
Twist bandeau bikini $58. 
Made of nylon/spandex. Sizes 6-14. 
Imported. Free Spirit: ivey's in 
the Carolinas and Florida. 
To order call toll-free 
1-800-438-4013. 

REGISTER IN FREE SPIRIT 
FEBRUARY 25-MARCH 24 TO 
WIN A TRIP FOR TWO TO 
SAN JUAN, PUERTO RICO. 
Accommodations for two days 
and two nights at the Caribe 
Hilton. Air transportation 
courtesy of U.S. Air, 
America's Most ^ y^ ^ . 
Frequent Flyer. IJiair\ir 




160 



VOGUE APRIL 1 



A MASCARA THAT PLUMPS YOUR 
LASHES UP TO 300% THICKER. 



itTlVll*"' 




After 



THE ONLY THING YOU 
GAIN IS FAT LASHES. 

With 2000 Calorie'" Mascara 
your lashes measure up to three 
times thicker The rich, water- 
resistant formula won't be moved 
by tears. Won't smudge or flake. 



Comes clean with soap and water 

The special anti-clump brush sweeps on 
2000 Calories so smoothly there's no question 
of spiking or over- doing. Thickens, lengthens, 
separates and curls. Hypoallergenic, 
ophthalmologist-tested. 

MAX RVCTOR 



1989 Max Factor & Co Available In Canada. 



The Science of Beautiful Eyes 



Now you 
can change the color of your eyes 
with confidence to color so believable the 
process is patented. That's the sensational scientific 
breakthrough of Mystique® colored contact lenses from 
CooperVision research. You asked. We listened. Mystique 
offers you a unique ultra-comfortable lens designed to give 
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Blue is beautiful and clean. Sapphire Blue is dark and rich. 
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IMAGES 

Editor: Shirley Lord 

Is British style merely eccentric j 

or is it a smoke screen for something 
else? JOAN JULIET BUCK, raiscd in London, 
gives an insider's point of view 



CLOCKWISE FROM 

LEFT: The face 

of the sixties, 

Jean Shrimpton, 

circa 1965; 

1980s London 

street fashion; 

"romantic and 

crashproof" 

debutante's 

ball gown, 

British 

Vogue, 1958. 





ISLAND NATIONS TEND TO EVOLVE ELABORATE 
rituals that only fellow islanders can understand, and 
conduct them on a miniature scale so as to save space. 

In Japan they have the tea ceremony, the arranging 
of flowers, and Zen archery. 

In England they have the tea ceremony, the arrang- 
ing of consonants and vowels, and costume. Ultimate- 
ly, the highest refinement is to perform the ritual with 

VOGUE APRIL 1990 



your eyes closed. Zen archers send their arrows off 
with the greatest abandon, and the British often seem to 
have dressed in the dark. 

This is called British style. Its key element is distrac- 
tion; without distraction, someone would have made 
sure they invented tights before they invented the mini- 
skirt. The early sixties had the lascivious lure of uncen- 
sored French cancan. Journalists from all over ^194 



191 






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IMAGES: brltish style 



the world came to Britain to peer up girls' skirts, and, being 
ish, the girls did not notice. 

The greatest mistake in England — be it in work, in love, 
art, in the decoration of houses, or in personal habits — is 
to try too hard. Until Mrs. Thatcher 
caused a psychic revolution by ^^ (^ 
making it acceptable to earn a liv- 
ing and love money, the attitude of 
choice was a polite wariness with 
outsiders and, in the conduct of 
one's own life, improvisation, 
economy, flights of nostalgic ex- 
travagance, and unconsciousness. 

"I found it in the cellar last night 
and thought: why not wear it to Jen- 
ny's do?" 

"My father had it made before 
the war. Doesn't fit him anymore, 
but I've had it since Oxford." 

"Camilla's coming to dinner to- 
morrow night, so you can't come 
because she hates you. ' ' 

Unconsciousness is the hallmark 
of British style. It con- top to bottom: On Carnaby 

sists of being slightly out Street, comfort comes before 
of Step with material real- fashion — clunky, thick-sole 

oxfords; mixed messages from 

Soho, 1989; Marianne Faithful!, 

1968; designer for the nineties 

Vivienne Westwood; 



; 



society rebel Nancy Cunard 
wearing her signature 
ivory bracelets, 1927. 



— --^^ 



«IK 



ity, except when going 
over a fence on a horse or 
contemplating the first 
glass of claret at dinner. It 
comes across as disre- 
gard for the feelings of 
others and feigned igno- 
rance as to the subtext. 
Clothes are part of the ne- 
cessity to appear as if one 
is doing something — 
working, going to a wed- 
ding, ushering at that 
wedding, having lunch, 
watching a race, having a 
dinner party. Those who 
want to be seen as their 
whole selves at all 
times — Califomians, an- 
alysts, and graduates of 
therapies — have no hope 
of attaining British pa- 
nache, where the mes- _ 
sage is: "This is not ■ *- * 

really me." Appearances are a tremendous joke. 

Because the British have an energetic, visible, 
and growing royal family, the totemic, heraldic, 
emblematic functions of costume are seen in ac- 
tion. The Queen wears her crown to open Parlia- 
ment every year, and it is a large, heavy crown. 
The Hermes head scarf that she wears to watch 
point-to-points m the rain is as symbolically hers 

194 



Brit- ,^^^^^^BK as the crown, and she 
wears both with equal digni- 
m ^^^^^^B^Hl^ ty. The peculiar pastel out- 
fits she wears for public 
functions serve to set her 
apart from the crowd, 
where the women, howev- 
er, are also wearing peculiar pastel out- 
fits .to pay her homage. Thus clothes 
serve not merely to cover nakedness or 
provide sensual delight in color, shape, 
and texture, but to signal who and what 
one is. Bankers have city suits; lady 
brokers have city suits; wives have pas- 
tel suits for lunches at San Lorenzo. 

"Isn't it dreadfulV a British man or 
woman will say with glee about his 
or her winter coat, skirt, or tie. Each 
persona is temporary, so that English- 
women can dress as sirens, tarts, Christ- 
mas-tree fairies, or 
magistrates without 
damaging their self- 
esteem. Over the 
surface of the cos- 
tumes is laid a patina 
of accidents, for the 
British have a certain 
blindness as to the in- 
cremental traces of 
decay that attack 
cloth, leather, nails, 
hair, and teeth. 
There is also the 
white-wine factor. 
White wine is said 
not to stain, but it 
can, after a time, 
stiffen fabric in unusual ways. 

Things have changed under Thatcher, but not 

completely. Journalists now wear Prince of 

Wales check suits instead of jeans; women buy 

Armani blouses instead of French Connection 

Indian cottons, but the suits are still virgin of dry 

cleaning, and the shoulder pads in the blouses 

tend to become wandering humps. The basic 

I colors offered by the chain stores (Marks and 

Spencer's, in particular) are still royal blue, red, 

and maroon. Spending money 

on oneself is now encouraged 

by society, but you hear "I 

shouldn't!" or "I mustn't!" 

from behind the curtains of 

changing rooms. 

The British have two natu- 
ral advantages: their skin (a 
result of the rain and the light 
touch used in heating ► 196 

VOG r E AI'K I I. 1990 



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IMAGES: brltlsh style 



houses, so that the epidermis never has a chance to dehy- 
drate) and their confidence, which allows them to jump 
into this or that temporary identity. British women pro- 
fess total ignorance as to what they use on their faces. 
"That red stuff." "That yellow stuff I got in Paris." 
"That soap stuff," et cetera. 

In the mid-sixties Katharine Whitehom in her newspa- 
per column in The Observer outlined the habits of what 
she called sluts. Now, in America a slut is a girl who 
doesn't notice with whom she is sleeping, but in England 
a slut is a woman who doesn't notice that 
her sweater is on inside out. Whitehom 
offered details, such as the method used 
for hiding holes in black stockings (paint- 
ing spots of india ink on the legs), and in 
another column advised that "shoulder 
straps can be kept going with paper 
clips." The slut's greatest problem was 
housekeeping, and she suggested ways to 
avoid having to make beds. It seemed hu- 
morous and entertaining at the time. Ten 
years later, Shirley Conran wrote a best-seller called 5m- 
perwoman, which gave sound advice on using duvets so 
as to avoid having to make beds. 

Two factors work against fashion in England: class and 
moral superiority. Class, of course, divides the haves 
from the wants, and although class died in 1962, it re- 
vived in 1977. Moral superiority has always existed; it 
produced the Puritans, gave rise to the Luddites and the 
Fabian Society, has fueled magistrates and missionaries 
for centuries, and is now responsible for The Body Shop, 
a company that makes cosmetics not tested on animals. 
(They make a green soap that smells exactly like Granny 
Smith apples on a spring day, when you take them out of 
the brown paper bag from the greengrocer's.) 

British class has become a commodity for foreigners 
in the form of Burberry raincoats, Scotch House kilts, 
cashmeres. Lock hats, and faint flower colognes from 
shops with complicated pairings of names. 

Moral superiority used to be associated with plain- 
ness: boiled peas and old tweed signified being above 
the enticements of sensual pleasure. A few years ago, 
when women protesting nuclear arms occupied Green- 
ham Common, the tag Greenham Common was applied 
to things the women wore: Indian print skirts, tasseled 
scarves, hippie clothes. The Greenham Common mes- 
sage was one thing, but its style was repulsively wor- 
thy. With costume as a national art, the British are 
obsessed with style. 

The great revolution took place in 1956 at the Royal 
Court, the Sloane Square theater where John Osborne's 
Look Back in Anger expressed, for the fu^t time, work- 
ing-class rage. Kenneth Tynan explained the play to the 
British, and suddenly all the calcified attitudes and cos- 
tumes of the country broke open. Within six years the 
Beatles were singing (working-class gaiety); women 
were wearing hipster trousers from Kiki Byrne and Mary 
Quant. Skirts went up, hair grew down; Ossie Clarke de- 



The British have 

two natural 

advantages: 

their skin and 

their confidence 



signed entirely transparent chiffon blouses made only 
half decent by Celia Birtwell prints. People fought over 
the panne velvet trousers at Vem Lambert's at the Chel- 
sea antiques market; Portobello Road disgorged old uni- 
forms to be worn as jokes, and such stuffy old shirtmakers 
as Tumbull & Asser began making six-button cuffs for 
male and female dandies who could spend hours woricing 
out combinations of shirting stripes. We wore white 
stockings, and each month British Vogue suggested who 
we should be. Italian restaurants opened up and down 
King's Road, filled with men with long 
blond hair in fringed suede jackets and 
girls with long blond hair in Hungarian 
embroidered blouses with hip belts im- 
probably made of machine gun casings. 
Everyone was in costume. 

Just as the theatrical revolution had 
needed a Kenneth Tynan to explain it, 
the sartorial revolution also needed a 
translator. It got thousands. Never had 
so many explained so little in such 
depth. The opportunity to come to London and look at 
all the colored gaiety was irresistible, and the style ex- 
hibited was photographed and chronicled for ten years. 
Of course, the foreigners always — as the British would 
say — * 'got it wrong. ' ' 

The most successful critic of British style was Peter 
York, who defined the Sloane Rangers, the Mayfair 
Mercs, the Haute Bohos, and so on. His pieces in 
Harper' s & Queen had more effect than mere pictures; 
he gave readers an identity. By profession a market re- 
searcher, York broke style into categories and made ex- 
tensive lists of the preferred goods in each category. At 
the time we devoured his lists because we thought we 
needed to know that Sloanes favored Gucci shoes, and 
Mayfair Mercs ate at Morton's and admired Bianca 
Jagger. In fact, we were being prepared for a radical 
shift in mental capacity, to wit the inability to read any- 
thing more complicated than a list. 

On the streets of London today you will see young 
girls in black leggings and asymmetrical jackets, carry- 
ing fake Chanel bags two feet by two; cautious brokers' 
wives in expensive suits with, here and there, an emer- 
gency safety pin because a seam ripped or a hem came 
apart; older women of the exact age at which New York 
women think they still have two marriages ahead of 
them in shapeless coats (the Brits like to give up early); 
Sloanes in down vests; Pre-Raphaelite beauties with 
animal-print scarves in their hair and flat black ankle 
boots; women dressed briskly, and women dressed 
nostalgically, and women vaguely wearing garments 
that do not add up. 

If you go to those areas where the young gather to 
demonstrate style, you will see whatever has been de- 
fined as style for that week; it is a form of changing of 
the guard, a ritual for which you have to have been pre- 
pared from birth. The only thing to remember is that in 
England, chic is an insult. • IMAGES ► 198 



196 



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IMAGES: skin-care specialists 

Americans are putting themselves in the capable 
hands of Eastern European skin-care experts, 

JULIE LOGAN rcports on a centuries-old tradition 




THE COMPLEXION OF THE WORLD IS CHANGING, BUT 
when it comes to skin care, let us not forget that we in 
the West have been opening our pores to Eastern Euro- 
peans for decades. 

When it comes to beauty, the French and the Italians 
have the style, but it's the Eastern Europeans who are 
known for their skin-care know-how. Names like 
Georgette Klinger, Ilona of Hungary, Janet Sartin, 
Christine Valmy , and Emo Laszlo are among those that 
got their start in Eastern Europe. 

The difference is in part cultural, because it's only in 
the last decade or two that the emphasis here has shifted 
away from makeup/cover-up toward skin care, where- 
as in Europe and particularly Eastern Europe the high- 
est priority has always been placed on the health and 
care of the skin. 

Eastern Europe may evoke images of women with 
babushkas on their heads, but don't forget that many of 
those we think of as women of the Warsaw Pact coun- 
tries are also daughters of the Austro-Hungarian em- 
pire, who have inherited a tradition of skin care going 
back for centuries, one that Communist regimes could 
not eliminate. 

"To enter beauty school in America all you have to 
do is pay," saysCristinaRadu, a Romanian-bom skin- 
care specialist with a thriving clientele in West Holly- 

198 



wood, California, "whereas to be accepted by my 
school in Bucharest, you had either to be a nurse or 
have four years of premedical college, which is what I 
had. But if you didn't have talent and the right touch, 
they didn't let you in either. Academically, we had to 
pass examinations in organic chemistry, physics, anat- 
omy, and physiology prior to the skin sciences. Then 
we studied dermatology and skin technology — mas- 
sage, facials, makeup application, waxing, and body 
work — before they would let us touch a face. ' ' 

The background in organic chemistry would explain 
why so many Eastern bloc-bom skin-care experts have 
also introduced their own product lines. One of the 
most successful carries Georgette Klinger' s name and 
is sold in her seven salons in the United States. 

Klinger agrees with Radu. "It's all in the education. 
Unlike America, it was absolutely unheard of to have 
hairdressing and skin care taught in the same school. 
To study skin, I traveled from my native Czechoslova- 
kia to Hungary and Austria. I took exams in both Buda- 
pest and Vienna and had to face a row of professors of 
dermatology who questioned me on everything from 
anatomy to chemistry. When I opened my salon in my 
home city of Brno (after convincing my obstinate 
mother-in-law to let me do it), my business was doing 
very well. When Hitler came, I left and went to ►208 



VOGl'E APRIL 1990 




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Hair Removal Moisturizer. At last, 
beautiful legs are no trouble at all. 






EPISAUNA ULTRA 



While there are many ways to cover-up flaws 
or imperfections, we feel a beautiful face starts 
with clean, glowing skin. 

With EpiSaun,.® Ultra,™ steam 
activates the skin's natural cleansing 
system, removing dirt and impurities. 
Even more, EpjSsentia™ Facial Care prod- 
ucts cleanse, exfoliate and moisturize, so 
your face looks and feels its very finest. 

i 
We've found a way to make 
your smile whiter. And brighter 
than ever before. EpiSmile™ has 
the exclusive, proven whitening 
ingredient, CalProx.™ It's a 
difference you can measure. 




EPISMILE 




s 1990 EPI Products USA. Inc 



So we invite you to step back with us to see and appreciate the 
bigger, and we feel better, picture that includes and embraces you 
as a whole. 

Just as we see beauty in a more total way, each Ultra product 
is a complete system with EpjSsentia™ skin care products and 
accessories. You can find the EPI Ultra line and EpiSmile in fine 
department stores or call us, (800) 444-5347. 

Perhaps you'd like to see it our Avay nov 



i 



• 




{ ""It's been almost four months since 
y vacation at Canyon Ranch. I can't 
lieve how great I still feel. 
I've been to other spas and have 
ways relapsed-l went back to the 'old 
e' within a week after getting home. 
Canyon Ranch proved to me that 
liat's good-to-do can also be fun-to-do. 
at life's choices should be enjoyable 
d do-able. I'm still on that natural high. 
I'm going to take a few Canyon Ranch 
^a getaways' before my next vacation, 
hink it's the best thing I can give 
^self-and it feels so good!" 
For reservations and information 
11-800-726-9900. 



i 



V 



Oi 





U SPA THAT NEVER LEAVES YOU. 



' 



CANYON RANCH TUCSON: 8600 EAST ROCKCLIFF ROAD, TUCSON, ARIZONA 85715 
YON RANCH IN THE BERKSH IRES'"": BELLEFONTAI NE, KEMBLE STREET, LENOX, MASSACHUSETTS 01240 




I 



- 1 



"After we got back from our fir 
Canyon Ranch vacation, we promis 
other that we'd never lose the exi 
we brought back with us. 

It doesn't matter how long it to 
us to get back there. The Canyon R 
experience has become a permaner 
our lives. 

Whenever anyone asks us why 
looking so terrific, we just tell thei 
'We're Still at the Ranch! 



I//A 



Call 1-800-726-9900 
for reservations and 
information. 



THE SPA THAT NEVER LEAVES YO 

CANYON RANCH TUCSON: 8600 EAST ROCKCLIFF ROAD, TUCSON, ARIZONA 85715 
CANYON RANCH IN THE BERKSHIRES''-': BELLEFONTAINE, KEMBLE STREET, LENOX, MASSACHUSETTS 01. 




Sweat. But sweat smart. 

Play even one short game and you put your body through countless 
tests. You run hard, stop on a dime, turn, twist, and do it again. o 

You need a shoe that keeps you at peak performance, every ^ ' 



grueling second. Like Kaepa cross court shoes. 



Performance starts with a 
custom fit. With the unique 
Action Hinge™ split 
vamp, Kaepa shoes 
are actually divided 
into two halves. 



/' 



Our unique Lace Locks™ then 
\ let you adjust the two halves sepa- 
\rately. Adjust the front half then 
lift the lace into the 
' 'lock ' ' position. Now 
you can adjust the 
, back without altering 
thefront. 




The two halves can move indepen- 
iently flexing naturally with your foot. 

That means no pinching. 
And fewer stress points. The 
outsole is a combination 
ofEndura™ Rubber and 
Super Endura'" Rubber 
Together, they deliver 
^^"^ ^^ superior traction, 
__^ support and 
^^wjiiHii^ du rability. 

) 1990 Kaepa. Inc 



i:) 



/^S 






▲A Kaepa cross court shoes come with built-in comfort. The collar 
is made of soft poly urethane. The linings are cool and breathable. 



Kaepa 's exclusive 
Lateral Motion 
I Stabilizer™ creates 
extra side-to-side 

stability without restricting your heel area. This 
helps you prevent ankle injury, and keeps you feeling 
less fatigued so you can play longer And stronger 




\ 
J 




Kaepa cross court shoes are also available 
in a cross trainer style. You 'II get the same 
smart features in a shoe that looks at 
home on the court or in the gym. 



'\-. 



i^ 



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^^ Kaepa 



SHARE OUR STRENGTH PRESENTS 




Taste ofik 9{aim 



NATIONWIDE BENEHT 
TO FEED THE HUNGRY 



HELP SATISFY YOUR APPETITE FOR GIVING 



Please join Share Our Strength for the third annual Taste of 



the Nation, a coast-to-coast benefit for the hungry and 



homeless held March 29, 1990. Enjoy a collective culinary 



tour de force prepared by your area's top chefs and help feed 



thousands of people — 100% of ticket proceeds are 



distributed to groups fighting hunger, here and through- 



outtheworld. For event details, call SOS at 1-800-222-1767. 



I^^^^^mI 




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IMAGES 



London." 

Although Klinger feels skin-care 
schooling in her native land isn't what it 
was before the war, she points out, "It 
is still so stringent it would send your 
average American-trained facialist 
whimpering off to secretarial school!" 

Ilona of Hungary is another epider- 
mal evangelist who spreads the word 
through her six salons scattered around 
the country, from New York to Palm 
Springs, Chicago to Denver, Houston 
to Costa Mesa. "In my country, main- 
taining the beauty of the skin is a way of 
life," she says. "It would be unthink- 
able for a Hungarian woman not to have 
monthly skin treatments. She is not a 
woman if she doesn't. ' ' 

Fifteen years ago Francesca Mayer 
managed — with difficulty — to find her 
way here from Romania, where she 
trained for two years to become a facial- 
ist. "Since there were far fewer prod- 
ucts available there, after you analyzed 
a person's skin, you had to prepare the 
correct treatment from the ingredients 
available ," she say s . " So in addition to 
being an estheticienne you had to be a 
bitof a chemist too. 

"A good facialist makes as much 
money as an attorney or doctor in Ro- 
mania," she adds, "and the profession 
earns the same amount of respect. It's a 
very high-status job . " 

Today, Mayer is a facialist at Bloom- 
ingdale's in New York City at the new 
and impressive Lancome Institute. This 
highlights the fact that all the training, 
skill, and professionalism acquired in 
Eastern Europe can be a double-edged 
sword for estheticiennes who flee their 
native countries. They have little diffi- 
culty finding employment when they 
come to the West, but few are prepared 
for the different status their profession 
is often accorded here. 

"It was hard and it hurt," Cristina 
Radu recalls, "but to survive you have 
to concentrate on thinking it's how you 
look at this business, not how the busi- 
ness looks at you." 

This positive attitude is perhaps anoth- 
er reason skin care studied and practiced 
in Eastern Europe thrives in many other 
parts of the world. A stunning blond from 
Czechoslovakia, Eve Lom runs one of 
the better facial salons in Lx)ndon, Eve 
Lom Complexions, and manufactures 
her own line of successful skin- ^212 



208 



VOGUE APRIL 1990 




SOFT 



FOCUS 



POWDER 



In reality, it's more than powder. Soft Focus Loose Powder lights the way to 
flawless skin. 

• Micronized powder particles are coated with a unique polymer. This exclusive 
material creates a perfectly smooth, uniform surface that bends light rays reflected 
from the face, diffusing the outline of wrinkles and reducing their visibility. 

• Soft Focus Loose Powder also beautifully evens out skin tone too. For a professional 
finish, stroke on with the luxurious Soft Focus Loose Powder Brush - and see the light. 

Allergy- tested. Dermatologist-tested, and Fragrance-free. 

Intelligent Skincare 

K^ COSMETICS, INC. 

Rurdines 

L^ THE FLORIDA STORE " 



DGUE APRIL 1990 



209 



SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Quitting Smoking 
Now Greatly Reduces Serious Risks to Your Health. 



i^^f*WrT 




■I: 



„ n %ILro I 
Marlboro j ^';i»:^s i 



LIGHTS 

lOvVtREO TAR NICOTINE 




The spirit of Marlbonnn a low tar cigarette. 



IIVIAGESi skin-care specialists 



care products as well. 

As she tells it, "My grandmother felt very strongly that a 
woman's skin and hair were her dowry, and she never let me for- 
get it. She would rub butter on my hair to condition it, forbad^ 
me to stay in the strong sun, and, to keep my complexion soft, 
had me wash my face in milk that had been left overnight. To this 
day, I can't stand the sight of milk. " 

All these women are survivors. Depending on their age, 
they've either seen war and revolution or lived under a repres- 
sive regime. The discipline that got them through their studies 
and the courage that enabled them to leave their homeland to 
make a new life obviously help them triumph here. 

Ilona of Hungary says, "We are unique. We have brought 
something good from the Old World to the United States, some- 
thing that can affect a simple fact in a woman's life — her skin. 
When she gets up in the morning, looks in the mirror, and sees a 
flawless, vibrant skin, she knows she can conquer the world!"* 

Where to go 

Anushka 

241 E. 60th St., New York, NY 10021; (212) 355-6404 

Christiana & Carmen 

128 Central Park South, New York, NY 10019; (212) 757-5811 

Francesca Mayer 

Lancome Institute, Bloomingdole's, Lexington Avenue and 59th St., 
New York, NY 10022; (212) 705-3166 

Georgette Klinger 

New York, Palm Beach, Bal Harbour, Beverly Hills, Dallas, 
Chicago; call (800) KLINGER to order products 

Gita Gabrile Yours Only 

30 E. 60th St., Suite 800, New York, NY 10022; 
(212) 486-1539 

Janet Sartin Institute 

30 E. 60th St., New York, NY 10022; (212) 832-9357 

Lia Schorr Skincare 

686 Lexington Avenue, Fourth Floor, 
New York, NY 10022; (212) 486-9670 

Lydia Sarfati Repechoge 

1037 Third Avenue, New York, NY 10021; (212) 319-1770 

Christine Valmy 

New York, Beverly Hills, Houston, Philadelphia, San Francisco, 

Washington, D.C., Tokyo; call (800) 22VALMY 

to order products 

Ilona of Hungary 

New York, Chicago, Denver, Houston, Palm Springs and Costa 
Mesa, California; call (800) 622-4355 to order products 

Cristina Radu 

at A. Adrian Salon, 148 North Weatherly Drive, 
Los Angeles, CA 90048; (213) 273-2304 

Mariana Ketchian 

Natural European Skin Care, 8238 West Third Street, 
Los Angeles, CA 90048; (213) 651-0979 

Joroslava 

1424 Fourth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98101; (206) 623-3336 

IMAGES ► 21 4 



212 



VOGUE A I' K I I. 19 90 



BY TOMORROW MORNIf 

YOU WON'T BELIE\ 
YOUR EYES 



EYE LIFT 
Corrective Eye Complex 
from CHANEL Research Labora' 
effectively reduces the appeara 
of puffiness and dark under-eye c 

The remarkable formular 

fortified with our exclusive comj 

of protein and soothing plant ext^ 

treats vulnerable skin so it fee 

firmer, more taut, more resilieil 

looks fresher and younger. ] 

Micro-capsules release 

fresh, potent concentrations ! 

Vitamin E, soothing and calmij 

delicate skin. Easily absorbed wi^ 

rubbing: no stretching sensitive | 

And it's totally oil-free. 

Nearly 70% of EYE LIFT use| 
tested saw a dramatic 
improvement after use. 
You must see for yourself! I 



*Patent pending. 

Ophthalmologist-tested. 

Dermatologist-tested. 






■■i 



j: 




CHAN 





INTRODUCES 

EYE LIFT 

TO COUNTERACT THE LOOK OF PUFFINESS AND UNDER-EYE CIRCLES. 



IMAGES 





In Paris, CLOCKWISE 

FROM FAR LEFT: At Yves 

Saint Laurent, a Rita 
Hayworth-inspired 
hairstyle with satin 
bow; Chanel's picture 
hat with giant tulle bow 
and, below, blush pink 
head wrap, front and 
back views. Jeweled 
brooches at Yves 
Saint Laurent; face- 
framing feather boa 
hat at Chanel. 



I 



\ 






^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^L *^l 


1 




1 




\ 

4 


m ' " -'' 


1 




.-• ^ 



At the collections 
this season, a new, 
softer, prettier 
look starts 
right at the top 



THE LOOK THIS SEASON IN FASHION. BEAUTY, AND 
hairstyles is pretty — very pretty — and feminine. 

At the Paris collections, whether hair was long or 
short, it often came adorned with a wide variety of flat- 
tering face-framing hats, soigne head wraps, and hair 
ornamentation reminiscent of the era of transatlantic 



214 





ocean crossings and white-tie open- 
ing nights. 

At Yves Saint Laurent, long hair, 
seen with a white bouffant tulle ball 
gown, was worn in a style evocative 
of the fifties: like Rita Hayworth's, it 
was full, flowing, wavy, and fas- 
tened at the side with a girlish blue 
satin bow on a comb. Worn with a more strictly-shaped 
black dress covered in jet paillettes, the dark chignon of 
another Saint Laurent model was studded with elabo- 
rate rhinestone brooches, a useful form of hair control 
that turned up at Chanel, too, topped with larger-than- 
life pearls. —SHIRLEY LORD IMAGES ► 216 



\ OG I E A I' R I I. 



le subtle new sensation fronn Giorgio Beverly Hills. 'I| I 

: ^ GIORGIO BEVERLY HILLS, NEW YORK. 1 1| I 



o '^ r 



-«A: 




BcwiK Hill.s 



IMAGES: beauty answers 



Overdoing cleansing or using the wrong products can 
irritate skin, but the marriage of medicine and 
cosmetics is helping to better educate consumers 



"WHY IS MY SKIN SO IRRITATED?" THIS, 
many dermatologists say, is the number 
one question that patients ask — and the 
answer often has more to do with how 
women care for their skin at home than 
any innate problem. 

"Some women falsely believe that if 
they just scrub their face enough, 
they'll remove dirt and rub off their 
'bad' top skin, getting down to a youn- 
ger, healthier skin," says Ronald Sher- 
man, M.D., senior clinical instructor of 
dermatology at Mount Sinai Medical 
Center, New York City. "In fact, over- 
doing cleansing is the primary cause of 
skin irritation and is certainly likely to 
aggravate acne. It's generally recog- 
nized now that a gentle approach — us- 
ing a mild soap and warm water to 



cleanse, and going easy on exfolia- 
tion — is a much more sensible regime 
for most skin." 

The realization that skin problems 
are often caused and exacerbated by at- 
home skin care has led many dermatol- 
ogists to take a more serious look at the 
role cosmetics play. 

Once the focus among dermatolo- 
gists was to treat only diseases of the 
skin. Now many doctors realize it's not 
enough to write an acne prescription 
and send a woman on her way; she also 
needs advice about what kinds of make- 
up and cleansers to use to keep her skin 
looking as good as possible between 
checkups and to prevent the worsening of 
a problem. 

It's for that reason many doctors are 



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PERFECTIOh 


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DES 



joining forces with nonmedical skin- 
.care experts, cosmeticians, and facial- 
ists. Sherman was one of the first to do 
this. His private practice includes a 
partnership with his wife, the experi- 
enced skin-care expert Trish McEvoy. 

Sherman prescribes necessary medi- 
cation, while McEvoy recommends a 
cleansing regimen and makeup prod- 
ucts based on the doctor's evaluation of 
the patient's skin. 

At last year's annual meeting of the 
American Academy of Dermatology, 
cosmetic exhibitors took up more than 
10 percent of the total convention 
floor — double the space of a decade 
ago — and they shared their space with 
representatives of surgical compa- 
nies, pharmaceutical manufacturers, 
and skin research groups. The Acade- 
my has recently been holding semi- 
nars on cosmetics, which are always 
well attended. 

"For years doctors were magisterial 
about cosmetics and stayed away from 
the cosmetic aspect of skin care for fear 
of not being taken seriously , ' ' says Lin- 
da Allen Schoen, director of the Neu- 
trogena Skin Care Institute. Now 
doctors give more information about 
cosmetics to patients, and manufactur- 
ers work to inform physicians about 
products, she says. 

Some dermatologists today have in- 
corporated a cosmetic approach to skin 
care by expanding their practices to in- 
clude cosmetic surgery, and also by 
making and selling their own skin-care 
products. Critics say that many of these 
doctors simply want to make more 
money, while proponents claim that as 
medical experts in skin care, dermatol- 
ogists are the most logical people to of- 
fer such services. 

Whatever the motivation, let's hope 
that the marriage between medicine and 
beauty will be a positive, productive 
one that will provide more information 
about skin care in the years ahead. 

— LAURA FLYNN McCARTHY 

IMAGES ► 220 



216 



/ 







■■■MAX 



'^\c} 



c-^» . 



'MASCARA PARFAIT 



RFFCTION IN THE WINK OF AN EYE 



PERFECTION OF THE FORMULA 
PERFECTION OF THE BRUSH 
PERFECTION OF THE LOOK 



/scd tashmere, Ophthalmologically tested. Mascara Parfait has been especially developed for sensitive eyes and contact lens wearers. 

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Come in for a 
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B U LLOC K' S Southern California 
At Selected Locations 




Kao Sofina 

restores your skin's natural moisture balance over 
your entire face to visibly improve the condition 
of your skin. 



Your skin is moisture-balanced 
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Dry cheeks ? Oily forehead ? Finally^ a moisturizing 
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what particular problem areas you have - no matter what your skin 
type - Kao Sofina helps restore your skin's moisture balance and 
normalize its condition over your entire face. Dry cheeks and eye 
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Kao Sofina works with your skin to enhance the intercellular 
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■ On first application you'll see how quickly Kao Sofina is 
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■ The next day, your skin feels rejuvenated. 

■ Continued use results in a beautifully moisture-balanced, 
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ADVERTISEMENT 



REDI<EN 



hair tips 

Shaping up for Spring... 
Body Language. ..The Line 
On Shine-And Design. 

m 

^^^k pring is here. April's showers herald the 
^^^^ blooming of a sunny new season and a 
^^^Bfresh new beauty focus. "Shape and move- 
^^^^ ment are the watchwords for the season," 
says Redken corporate spokesperson, Ann Mincey 
"body-defining, body-refining designs. ..activewear 
and active /ja/r-with a fix on fitness and streamlined 
style that "swings' with you... and I mean swings" 

Whether your hair is short and chic, or long and 
luxurious, the long and the short of beautiful, healthy 
hair has always been Redken. Each Redken Classic 
haircare product is designed for specific, individual 
hair textures and conditions. Redken shampoos work 
with your hair's natural chemistry to gently cleanse 
and fortify-without dryness or stripping. Each Redken 
rinse is designed to leave hair protected, shiny and 
manageable. 

For hair still suffering those winter woes, Redken's got 
the treatment-natural-protein, hair-fitness formula- 
tions that strengthen, protect, repair and moistur- 
ize. ..to restore hair's natural balance. The newest 
line on shape and shine? CAT™ Protein Network 
System. CAT replenishes winter-worn-out hair 
with renewed body bounce and brilliance. 




If you're looking for a little seasonal 

style versatility, Redken styling ,- ' 

products speak a body language ^L') 

all their own. SUSPEND™ -~^ 

Forming and Mending Spray ^ C 

Gel delivers gravity-defying lift \ 

and volume, lends "take control" 

styling support-without stiffness- 

and mends those ends. Refine, define and design 

with Redken creative styling products. 

Redken has just the regimen to make your rites of 
spring just right. Environment-safe, with no animal 
testing. Redken products are guaranteed to deliver 
superior results every time, or your money back! The 
Redken Classic collection. ..for beautiful, healthy hair 

FOH MORE INFORMATION OR TO HAVE YOUR HAIR 
QUESTIONS ANSWERED-m\te to Ann Mincey at 
Redken Laboratories, Dept. A, 6625 Variel Avenue, 
Canoga Park, CA 91303. For free samples of Redken 
Classic haircare products or the name of the Redken 
salon nearest you, call 1-800-542-REDKEN. 

©Redken Laboraries. Inc 1990. 



IMAGES: hair answers 

which styling products work 
best with hair's texture and 
style? Here, how to choose 

MORE TOOLS AND MORE GOO— MOUSSE, STYLING SPRITZ, MISTS, 
gel, and spray gel — don't lead to better-looking hair unless they 
work well with hair texture, length, and style. New products can 
give women the option of more looks from one haircut, but con- 
fusion still reigns when it comes to which products and tech- 
niques work best for which styles. 

Heavy gels made the wet look possible, but according to An- 
drew Collinge, artistic director of Intercoiffure, Great Britain, 
and a new consultant to Alberto Culver here, gels can also be 
used to bring out the natural texture of hair. A good technique, he 
says, is to dab a tiny bit of gel on fingertips — about the amount 
that would fit on a toothbrush — and apply to hair surface to gen- 
erate shine along with control. 

Hair texture is the first thing to consider when choosing a styl- 
ing product. Most hair types take to mousse, but women with 
fine hair should apply it only to very wet hair in order to dilute it 
and thus prevent weighing hair down. 

Other professional tips: to add volume to normal hair use a 
golf-ball-size amount of mousse throughout before blow-dry- 
ing. To get lift at hair roots, apply one of the new moisturizing 
spray gels to roots only, when hair is partly dry, and comb it in 
gently (Vidal Sassoon Spray-On Gel). 

New twists on tried-and-true styling aids come from Antonio 
de Costa Rocha, a creative director of La Coupe in New York 
City. He fills water misters with beer and sprays it over hair be- 
fore blowing dry . "The sugar and water in the beer help to set the 
style and give great control without adding any residue to the ' 
hair," Antonio says. He warns that the technique works only for 
women whose hair is in good condition. For chemically treated 
hair, the alcohol in the beer is too drying. 

Antonio believes the one styling product most women can't 
do without is hair spray. "It's the one product that really enables 
hair to hold a particular style, ' ' he says, ' 'but just how much hold 
you need varies with the style and the humidity level." (Many 
hair sprays are now formulated to combat different climatic chal- 
lenges: Gillette's Mink Difference Anti-Humidity Formula; 
Charles Booth's Professionnel Spritz Superfixant with three ad- 
justable settings; for rainy days, Alberto Culver's Alberto Styl- 
ing Spray Ultra-Hold; for temperate days, Sebastian's Shaper 
Hair Spray.) 

For most women, Antonio believes the easiest tools for styl- 
ing at home are a blow-dryer and a styling vent brush made of 
molded plastic with holes through the base. "As air flows 
through the brush, it adds volume," he points out. 

For more stubborn fine hair, he recommends a curling iron to 
add soft waves and the illusion of thickness. Hot rollers are not 
recommended for use on a daily basis as they dry out the hair. 
Antonio says a safer option is to dry hair completely, then set it 
on a few big textured rollers for about twenty minutes. When 
hair is brushed, it will have added volume without the creased, 
dry look that hot rollers can give. — LAURA FLYNN McCARTHY 

220 




Logo Paris eyewear- always in 
good taste. Like an authentic 
French dehcacy, Logo Pahs eye- 
wear combines qualities to en- 
hance your pleasure . . . comfort 
beyond compare... exquisite de- 
sign and proven durability. 

Whatever the occasion, you can 
expect fashion and elegance from 

OGUE APRIL 1990 



LES LUNETTES 
LOGO PARIS 

SONT 
DELICIEUSES. 




PARIS 



Finest European Eyewear 



the Logo Paris collection... fresh 
colors and textures ... 22-karat 
gold finishing ...and fine European 
craftsmanship. All to express your 
unique sense of personal style. 

Taste something utterly 
delicious -Logo Paris eyewear. 

Call for the nearest location: (800) 556-5646. 



221 



RTNESS 



Good fun, good 

workout: model Linda 

Evangelista takes a tap 

lesson with Broadway 

hoofers Ted Levy and 

Lon Chaney, from 

Black and Blue. 



m 




Dance classes keep 
the mind occupied with 
history, culture, and 
tradition while the 
muscles do their thing. 
MARY ROACH reports 

TO LOOK AT ME. YOU'D THINK I'M HAVING A GREAT 
time. I'm jumping up and down. I'm waving my arms 
in the air. In tiie grammar of human body language, I'm 
saying, "How exciting!" 

It's a He. I'm not having a great time. I am doing 
step-hops with monkey arms. I'm taking aerobics this 
week because my samba class was canceled. Great 
workout, said a friend. If you like dance, you'll love it. 

I hate it. I'm peering through a phalanx of neon Ly- 
cra legs, trying to focus on the ones that belong to our 
instructor, Keith. "Heel jack and cross jog!" he 
shouts. "Left, right, left!" Right. I give up and assume 
a holding pattern of random flailings — my personal in- 
terpretation of "[She's a] Maniac," presently blasting 
woofer-heavy over the speakers. 

Granted, it's a great workout. Too great, perhaps — 
Keith is yelling. "Lung collapse!" I turn to the woman 
next to me in alarm. 

222 



"No, lunge claps/' she says. "That's the move 
you're supposed to be doing. "Oh. 

Back in the locker room, I ask my comrades if 
they've ever considered taking dance classes. You 
don't have to be a dancer, I assure them; a lot of people 
go mainly for the exercise. And dance has history and 
culture and tradition — a little something to keep the 
mind occupied while the muscles do their thing. Sure, 
aerobics is dance. Just like greeting-card verse is poet- 
ry. But why spend your time on Hallmark when you 
could be reading Yeats? 

With dance, you can see yourself making progress. 
Not the kind that's measured with skin-fold calipers, 
maybe, but the kind that enables you to step fearlessly 
onto the dance floor in a Brazilian nightclub, master 
difficult routines, move up to advanced classes. Take 
aerobics for a year and what do you end up with? An 
extensive repertoire of useless motions. 

A woman in high-gloss teal interrupts my harangue. 
Dance classes sound like fun, she says, but are they 
really an effective cardiovascular workout? What per- 
centage of my maximum heart rate am I achieving? Am 
I spending twenty continuous minutes in my aerobic 
target zone? 

What can I say? The last time I spent twenty continu- 
ous minutes in a zone I got a forty-dollar ticket. Be- 
sides, you don't need a stopwatch and a calculator to 
know you're getting good exercise. "If people are be- 
ing honest with themselves," says Douglas Bailor, an 
assistant professor with the University of Wisconsin's 
physical education and dance department, "they ► 226 



VOG I E A I' K I 1. 19 90 



All you have to be Is you. 



Liz Claiborne 



A 



The Fragrance 





A DAY'S WORTH OF C 



ee how easily dairy calcium fits 
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AY NATURE INTENDED.' 



FITNESS 



have a pretty good sense of whether they're getting a 
good workout." Simply noting how hard you're 
breathing yields a surprisingly reliable assessment of a 
workout. The experts call it perceived exertion, and 
they've devised a simple scale to measure it, from 
"very, very light" to "very, very hard." "In one 
study," says Bailor, "perceived exertion proved a 
more consistent measure of cardiovascular activity 
than heart rate." 

A good instructor can forge a solid aerobic workout 
for beginners, even with a relatively low-energy dance 
like a waltz. Recently, Betty Rose Griffith Railey, a 
physical education professor at California State Uni- 
versity, Long Beach, measured students' heart rates 
during an assortment of beginning ballroom dance rou- 
tines. Sixty-two percent stayed within their aerobic tar- 
get zone throughout the twenty-minute mix. 

So, based on my perceived exertions (and, in some 
cases, my perceptions of people exerting themselves in 
classes across the hall), I've rated and ranked the activi- 
ty level of a variety of dances, all from a beginner's per- 
spective. Remember, these aren't consistent scientific 
assessments; they're simply the opinions of a reporter 
who refuses to appear in public with a heart monitor 
strapped beneath her leotard. 

HARD TO VERY, VERY HARD 
Samba. The feet are in a breakneck triple step. Arms 
are outstretched, shoulders shimmying. The hips are 
doing things they've never done in a standing position. 
Even without the almost-costumes of Carnival, it's a 
very sexy dance. 

Afro-Haitian, Afro-Cuban, Afro-Brazilian. The 
steps and rhythms differ slightly from region to region; 
it's the shoulder and back motions that make the dances 
unmistakably "Afro." Brought to Brazil and the Ca- 
ribbean by slaves, the dances were part of their tribal 
religious rites, which were a good bit more lively than 
sit-stand-kneel. Imagine leaning forward and shrug- 
ging out of your coat while sitting in the back of a car. 
Now take away the car. Hold that position, still moving 
the shoulders and back. Add some footwork. Lose the 
coat. Kick off the shoes .... 

SOMEWHAT HARD TO HARD 
Tap. Rhythm tap is Mr. Bojangles jazz-era tap. 
Broadway tap is the film and stage version; the move- 
ments are bigger and showier than in rhythm, and 
there's less emphasis on the fancy footwork. Neither is 
as hard as it looks. 

Jazz. Show jazz is Broadway tap without the funny 
shoes — a respectable workout of the chorus-line vari- 
ety. As with the music, jazz dance hybrids abound: jazz 
blues, modem jazz, jazz funk, and Jazzercise. 

Belly dance. You're not just standing around fold- 
ing dollar bills with your stomach; you're twirling, 
arching, shimmying, undulating. (And you don't have 
to wear a coin braif you don't want to.) 



Swing. Partner dance from the jazz era, though 
there's nothing cheek-to-cheek about it. The lindy is 
the original swing — sort of a jitterbug on speed. You'll 
also findvEast- and West-coast swing. As with ballroom 
dance, many places that offer swing lessons also spon- 
sor dances. 

Ballroom. In American ballroom — waltz, fox-trot, 
and the like^ — just master the numbered footprints on 
the floor and the rest of the body follows. The Latin 
dances — salsa, tango, rhumba — demand more of the 
torso: swiveling hips, a sinuous rib cage. 

FAIRLY LIGHT 

Social dance. The foot-stomping, hand-clapping 
dance-hall socials — square dance, folk, Cajun, and 
polka, among others — are not the sort of dances on 
which to base a complete exercise regime. But they are 
a healthy alternative to sitting on your duff in a movie 
theater on a Saturday night. 

Ballet and modern. As art goes, they're very aero- 
bic , but it all depends on the instructor and your level of 
expertise. There are other benefits to consider, though, 
including strength, flexibility, and improved posture. 

VERY LIGHT 

Hula. More like sign language than exercise, at least 
for beginners. Twenty minutes of my first class was 
spent learning hand motions for "Tiny Bubbles." 

Classical Eastern dance. Like hula, Asian and Indi- 
an dance often tells a story. As the stories tend to focus 
on the lives of deities, the physical fitness theme usual- 
ly doesn't figure prominently in the narrative. Some 
forms of Indian dance are actually performed from a 
sitting position. 

Be it tap or Tahitian, a good dance workout should 
do several things. It should warm up slowly and cool 
down gradually. It should work you, but not overwork 
you. "A good instructor watches the class," says 
Blanche Brown, who teaches Haitian dance at San 
Francisco's Third Wave dance studio. "If they're real- 
ly getting breathless, that's where you take a moment 
out to talk about the dance." Don't worry that a break 
will interrupt your time in the aerobic target zone. 
"There are studies coming out now," says Susan John- 
son of the Institute for Aerobics Research in Dallas, 
"showing that interval work, which gets your heart rate 
up fairly high and then brings it back down every few 
minutes, can be just as effective as a workout that stays 
in the moderate range. ' ' 

In the long run, the best workouts are the ones that 
don't feel like work. The more you enjoy something, 
the longer you'll stick with it. Of course, "alotofpeo- 
ple don't want to have to think about technique and 
work on the subtleties of the dance," says Brown. 
"They just want to move." In which case, there's ab- 
solutely no reason to take anything other than aerobics. 
If the shoe fits, flail it. • FITNESS ► 228 



226 



V O G II E A I' K I I. 19 9 




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She dives fast, far-and 
without air. vicki woods 
explores the depths of 
endurance with Italy's 
Angela Bandini 

SAINT SIMEON STYLITES WAS A FIFTH-CENTURY 
Christian who sat atop a pillar for thirty years. You 
could say he held the world record for sitting atop a pil- 
lar; it was later broken by one Saint Alypius (sixty-sev- 
en years). Stylites had a deep certainty of belief in God. 
Pillar sitting was how he chose to express that. 

Angela Bandini is a twenty-eight-year-old Italian 
from Rimini who took the world record last October 
in a sport that's about as comprehensible to the lay- 
man as pillar sitting: breath-hold diving. In a little 
boat off the island of Elba, Bandini strapped heavy 
weights to the belt of her wet suit. Then she held her 
breath, shot down into the sea to an inky depth of 107 
meters (353 feet), dropped the weights, and came 
back up again, smiling. She was underwater for two 
minutes and forty-five seconds. The women's record 
at the time was eighty meters; the men's, 105. "I 
dived very fast," she told me. "The velocity was 
1 .94 meters a second. ' ' She saw me doing math in my 




in- 

IK 
01 
'J 



tt 

ril 



Bandini training in a pool, top, and above, last October, 
after breaking the world record for breath-hold diving 

head — 1.94 meters equals 6.4 feet — and searched 
for a comparison. "Like a Ferrari!" she said. 

It's very apt. If Bandini were a car, she'd be a Fer- 
rari. She is slender, fragile-looking, but quick as a 
whip. She is five feet tall and weighs less than one 
hundred pounds. 

Breath-hold diving is a warm-water sport, ^230 



228 



%• O G I' E A P K I I. 19 9 



LOSINGWEIGHT 

by 

Cristina Ferrare 



lost 25 Ws. 

in S months... / 

And I feel terrific!'' ^^' 

Cristina Ferrare 

"How I went from size H to 
a size 10." 

Even when I was a model, I always worried 
ibout my weight. I tried all kinds of diets... but 
they all left me feeling tired and depressed. This 
\pril, I had a beautiful baby and in May I still 
lad 25 pounds to lose. Honestly, I didn't know if I 
30uld do it. 

Then I discovered Ultra SUm-Fast. . . 
was amazed how easy it was. 

I didn't feel like I was on a diet — never hungry 
br deprived and I lost all that weight on the Ultra 
^lim-Fast Program. I had a thick delicious Ultra 
ilim-Fast shake for breakfast (hint: I make it in a 
)lender with ice), one for lunch, and a Slim-Fast 
Nutrition Bar for a snack (the peanut butter ones 
ire great!), then a sensible dinner every night. We 
ven went out to my favorite restaurants. 

was amazed at how energetic I felt. 

Ultra Slim-Fast is healthy and nutritious. Each 
hake gave me an abundance of vitamins, minerals, 
irotein, important fiber and carbohydrates. This 
lutritionally balanced program gave me all the 
nergy I needed to keep up with my hectic sched- 
de — and my four children. 

Best of all, I actually went from a size 14 to a size 
3! And I haven't felt this good since 1 was 22." 





Cristina Ferrare: Slim and Looking Great! 



Cristina^ Diet Recipe = Ultra Slim-Fast + Imagination. 

I >*%i 

Cristi na 's Pina Colada Mocha Creme 



8 oz. skim milk 

1 heaping scoop Ultra Slim.- Fast 

Vanilla 

'lu cup pineapple 

'I4 cup banana 

•% tsp. coconut extract 

'lu tsp. rum extract 

1 pack lo-cal sweetener 

10-12 Ice cubes 

Blend until smooth. 



8 oz. skim milk 

1 heaping scoop Ultra Slim-Fast 

Chocolate 

I'/jj tsp. instant coffee 

I'h packs lo-cal sweetener 

10-12 Ice cubes 

Blend until smooth. 



ITE: Cristina Ferrare may not bu l.vpical of the average Slim-Fast usee Most users need 
I lose less weight. Weight loss varies wiihi the individual depending on a variety of factors. 



■S-£- 



CUT ALONG DOTTED LINE 



© 1889 Nutrition Division Thotnpson Medical Company Inc. 



FITNESS 



mainly practiced by the French and Italians. Americans 
don't go in for it at all, nor do the British. We non-Med- 
iterranean types like to take a big fat Aqua-lung stuffed 
full of life-enhancing oxygen down into the abyss with 
us. We don't mind maybe dropping down thirty feet or 
so with a snorkel. But to sink like a stone into the black 
and the cold with — nothing? No, no. 

In Italy, Bandini is a star. La Star de- 
gUAbissi, it says on the magazine cov- 
ers: star of the deep. La Ragazza 
Delfino: dolphin-girl. I flew to Rimini 
to meet the dolphin-girl. The town 
doesn't figure very large in smart travel 
books. In summer it's crowded with 
cheap-package tourists from Britain, 
Germany, and Sweden. The patch of 
Adriatic that rises and falls tidelessly 
off the beaches is one of the most noi- 
some stretches in the Mediterranean, 
prone to red tides of stinking algae that 
cluster in the warm, polluted waters. 
Stunning-looking prostitutes in furs stroll up and down 
under the streetlights, while little Fiats whiz by, honk- 
ing. In winter, thick fog rises off the sea most days and 
swirls over the esplanade. Rimini's only famous child, 
before Angela Bandini, was Federico Fellini. He used 
the foggy esplanade as the setting for Amarcord. 

Before traveling to Rimini, I watched Luc Besson's 
The Big Blue, the slow-bum, cultish movie based on 
the battle between two other biggies in the breath-hold 
diving game, Jacques Mayol and Enzo Maiorca. Actor 
Jean-Marc Barr made dives down to 140 feet for the 
movie, training himself to hold his breath for three and 
a half minutes at a time. He told a London newspaper 
that the diving "became almost a spiritual experience. 
You feel you don't exist, that you could stay down there 
forever." 

Bandini dives down to nearly three times that depth, 
and it's hard to say whether her physical or her spiritual 
endurance is more impressive. Let's start with the 
physical. In this sport, the wall is at about 160 feet. At 
this depth, she says, everything in your body "takes up 
its position against the pressure," and from then on, as 
you sink deeper, "the body has a sort of stability. All 
the soft parts, all the vital organs, come up into the tho- 
rax." She pointed to her slender rib cage and stroked 
her hands up her body to show how and where. Liver? 
Stomach? I asked, aghast. "Everything. And from 160 
feet onward, everything is in place. Of course, the pres- 
sure increases as you go farther down, but everything is 
ready for it. " The pressure is about fifty pounds on ev- 
ery square inch of skin. Her eyes are shut when she 
dives. "It's completely black down there. As I dive so 
fast, I have special contact lenses over my eyes." Gog- 
gles would implode at these depths. Other breath-hold 
divers come out of the water loose-limbed and wob- 
bling; she bursts iut smiling, as fresh as a rose. She told 
me she'd actuall> waited at thirty-three feet for forty- 



Other divers 
come out of the 
water loose- 
limbed and 
wobbling. 
Angela bursts 
out, smiling 



two seconds before surfacing from her record dive: "I 
like to know I have time in hand. ' ' 

Anyone who puts her body through this unbelievable 
exercise has to have incredible mental reserves. Ban- 
dini 's strength of mind comes, she says, from God, and 
she owes her record, her techniques, and her tranquil- 
lita interna (inner peace) to her mae- 
stro, Leo Amici, who died in 1986. 
"He gave me serenity and sureness in- 
side and a concrete belief in God," she 
says. Was he your coach? "No, no. 
More than that. Maestro. He was like 
my teacher of life . " 

Amici urged her to go through the 
wall at 160 feet, and when she made 170 
he said, "Now you're ready for 360." 
He told her to get do^nfast (she carries 
the heaviest belt and dives faster than 
anyone else) and not to stop on the way 
down like other divers (in The Big Blue, 
you see them halt their descent and blow 
out twice). How did Amici know all this? I wondered. 
Was he a doctor? A diver? Bandini wasn't specific, de- 
scribing her maestro in terms that made him sound like 
a mix of the Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and Steffi Graf's 
daddy. He was a "great man," she says, with experi- 
ence in many fields, but his deepest knowledge was 
knowledge of men. 

Bandini works in a community called I Ragazzi del 
Lago (Children of the Lake), founded by Amici in 
1982 for "the development of young people." Some 
hundreds strong, the community centers on an aban- 
doned farm in the hills above Rimini . Its members are 
mostly young, mostly good-looking, and shining 
with happiness and inner peace, and they run a the- 
ater school , a film production studio, a fashion work- 
shop, an art school, and a music studio. When she 
isn't holding her breath at 350 feet underwater, sup- 
ported by a team from I Ragazzi del Lago, Bandini's 
high-kicking in its musical productions. The whole 
place is dedicated to the memory of Leo Amici and to 
good works (they help rehabilitate tossicodipen- 
denti — a wonderful Italian word from which I finally 
puzzled out "junkies"). "The maestro helped us all 
to value ourselves," says Bandini, "so that whatever 
we do, we can do well." 

Bandini seems terrifically happy in her own baffling 
field and secure about her abilities. "The maestro al- 
ways believed in me," she says. "He taught me not to 
fear the abyss." I've heard these sentiments before, 
from women skaters, runners, gymnasts, tennis play- 
ers. You can do it, says the coach, and she does it. Hits 
the wall, breaks the barrier, pushes at the limit. 

Bandini says that if someone breaks her record, she 
will dive again. Deeper, farther, faster. My blood chills 
at the thought, and I can only hope that in heaven. Mae- 
stro Leo Amici will be watching over her next attempt. 
Not to mention Saint Simeon Stylites.* fitness ► 235 



230 



VOGUE APRIL 1990 



YOUR BILLS 

YOUR BANK STATEMENT 

THE LIHER BOX 

YOUR EX-BOYFRIEND 

THE PARKING METER 

YOUR THERAnST 
YOUR TRAFFIC TICKET 

YOUR CAR 

P.M.S. 

THE PLUMBER 

YOUR BOSS 

THE ENVIRONMENT 

THE TELEPHONE 

THE I.R.S. 

YOUR CARPOOL 

YOUR OTHER EX-BOYFRIEND 

ME THREAT OF NUCLEAR WAR 

THE TELEVISION 
YOUR BIOLOGICAL CLOCK 
THE CLOCK ON THE WALL 



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FITNESS 



Looking great in the 

season's new short shorts 
may take a lot of work, 

but as PAMELA KAUFMAN 

reports, the payoff goes 
far beyond aesthetics 

AT 7:00 EVERY THURSDAY MORNING. AS THE SUN RISES 
over the (momentarily) quiet streets of Manhattan, a 
small group of women purposefully climb the battered 
stairway to the Molly Fox Studios. Under the watchful 
eye of a young woman in a black unitard, they spend the 
next grueling hour doing exercises that zero in on those 
muscles referred to, rather inelegantly, as the gluteals. 
The class is called Butt, Butt, Butt, and although the 
name is a joke, by the end of the session — after hundreds 
of torturous squats and lunges — no one is laughing. 

Most women see nothing funny in their efforts to 
firm up the muscles and shake off the 
fat that tends to accumulate in this part 
of the body. The reason that happens 
is, in part, genetic: the female body of- 
ten stores reserves of fat in the hips, 
thighs, and buttocks, tapping into 
them only when the woman is preg- 
nant or breast-feeding. Toning the 
gluteals is especially difficult because 
while these large "power" muscles 
are engaged in almost all walking, 
running, and jumping exercises, few activities chal- 
lenge them directly and with enough force to really 
improve strength and tone. 

Still, reshaping the buttocks may be tough, but it's 
not impossible. "You just can't expect to see drastic 
changes overnight, ' ' says Mike Motta, head trainer and 
co-owner of New York City's Plus One Fitness Clinic. 
"Muscles will become measurably stronger within a 
few weeks of starting a fitness program, but visible 
changes in tone and shape won't happen until some of 
the fat covering these muscles is eliminated. This can 
take anywhere from eight weeks to eight months. ' ' 

Allover fat loss, achieved with a low-calorie, low-fat 
diet and regular aerobic exercise, will help. "The spot- 
reducing myth-^the belief that a thousand squats and 
lunges, for example, will 'bum off the fat in the but- 
tocks — has been pretty much laid to rest," says exer- 
cise physiologist Sue Thompson. 

Some aerobic exercises, especially stair climbing, 
jumping rope, race walking, and cross-country skiing, 
do have muscle-toning as well as fat-burning (not to 
mention cardiovascular) benefits. But to really shape 
and strengthen the gluteals, fitness professionals agree. 



Stair climbing can 
help tone gluteal 

muscles, but 

lunges and squats 

really zero in 



you need specific toning exercises that forcefully work 
the muscles through their range of motion. (Isometric 
buttock "squeezes" simply don't work the gluteals 
hard enough to bring about change.) Since gluteal exer- 
cises can strain the lower back and knees if performed 
incorrectly, it's a good idea to practice with a trainer be- 
fore attempting them on your own. 

• Lunges: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, 
with back straight and abdominal muscles tucked in. 
Step forward about two feet with the left leg, bending 
both knees, until the front thigh is parallel to the floor 
and the back knee almost touches it. Be sure not to bend 
the knees more than 90 degrees, as this could strain 
knee ligaments. Push off with the left leg and return to 
upright position, then repeat with the right leg. Do 15 to 
20 repetitions to start. As muscles become stronger, in- 
crease resistance by holding hand weights or a barbell. 

• Squats: From a standing position, bend at the knees 
and hips, as if about to sit in a chair, until thighs are par- 
allel to the ground. Keep your back straight and 
abdominals tucked in. Again, be sure to maintain at 
least a 90-degree angle between the thigh and lower 
leg. Return to upright position. Repeat as above. 

• Buttocks presses: Resting on your 
forearms and knees, squeeze the but- 
tocks together and lift one bent leg. The 
sole of the foot should be parallel to the 
ceiling and the hip fully extended. Then 
lower the leg, keeping the gluteals con- 
tracted, until the knee touches the floor 
again. Keep the pelvis angled down to 
prevent arching the lower back. Do 16 
to 32 repetitions with each leg, then 16 
to 32 small pulses while holding the 
thigh parallel to the floor and the back straight. As your 
muscles get stronger, add light ankle weights. 

Squats and lunges are the most practical strengthen- 
ers because they closely simulate real-life movements. 
But some women may need the extra back support and 
stability that resistance equipment like Nautilus's hip 
and back machine or the Cybex leg press provides. To 
prevent pulled muscles and general soreness, start 
weight training conservatively, aiming to complete 
only one set of 7 to 10 repetitions with the lightest 
weight on the machine. As you get stronger, increase 
the number of sets and repetitions, always keeping the 
resistance light to define, not enlarge, muscles. Both 
machine and floor workouts should be performed no 
more than two or three times a week, to give muscles 
time to adjust to the training. 

If it seems frivolous to go to all this trouble just for a 
sleek physique, think again: the benefits of toned glu- 
teals — an increase in healthy lean-tissue mass, im- 
proved performance in sports, the extra strength to lift a 
heavy suitcase, say, or change a flat tire — go way be- 
yond aesthetics. In the end, looking good in short 
shorts is just a great perk. • 



VOG I E A F' R I 1, 1990 



235 



THE BEAUTY OF 



PAUL MITCHELL 



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PEOPLE ARE TALKING ABOUT. 



1^ 1^ Icincl ^^ '^^*' ^"^^"can guidebooks with real information. LA. Man and L.A. 
Woman are hardcover pocket-size guides from Warner Books in vintage L.A. 
shades of yellow and turquoise. Each has a radio-station guide for desperate rental-car drivers, 
shopping sources from auction houses to swap meets, and services from pet doctors to jet charters. 
Look under "Hangouts" for Gorky 's twenty-four-hour cafe. "The birthplace of glasnost/' it 
has Eastern European food and live music every night .... Another L.A. spot that's hot is Hugo's in 
West Hollywood — but only in the morning. That's when the"D-girls and D-boys" (the devel- 
opment folks from the city's top studios) get together to discuss their latest film projects .... 

£^f%^\f^^w\ rtCC^CQ ^"^^ *° form, PBS is leading the march from East to West. On 

April 20, the network will broadcast Audience, a play by new 
Czech president Vaclav Havel. Hosted by Paul Newman and produced by the Actors Studio, 
the show will also include interviews with the supercool Havel, as well as visits to his apartment, 
office, former jail cell, and the brewery where he used to work — and where the play is set ... . Not 
that we aren't sending equally fine samples of Western culture right back at 'em. In addition to Mc- 
Donald's — which on opening day in Moscow drew a crowd of thirty thousand — Rotary Club chap- 
ters have been started in Warsaw and Budapest, and one in Siberia is on the way. Despite the fact 
that the Warsaw chapter actually allows Communist members, cabdrl vers in Gdansk have al- 
ready been imbued with that Rotarian free enterprise spirit — they offer side trips to the home of 
Lech Walesa .... 

|i^^^2^ niort The Institute for Media Analysis has inaugurated L/e5 o/Owr r/me^, "a 

monthly magazine of media criticism, devoted to the expose of misinfor- 
mation, disinformation, and propaganda. ' ' The title refers not just to times in which we live, but the 
Times we live by — The New York Times is the most cited news organ in the country. It's also 
becoming the most watched. The paper's purported lies and misdeeds are already accorded a full 
page in Spy each month, so it must be doing something right — or wrong, as the case may be ... . 
Meanwhile, on the opposite coast the Environmental Media Association has been formed to alert 
the TV and film community to "the importance of including environmental issues in their programs. ' ' 
Board members include Hollywood heavies Barry Diller, Mike Ovitz, and Mike Eisner. . . . 

hcicl^^ to hllcIil^CC After a decade characterized by show-off mergers-and-ac- 

quisitions men and junk-bond-happy LBO artists, the new 
heroes are those CEOs who are buckling down and running their companies the old-fashioned way. 
They may not have a choice. Drexel Bumham Lambert, which posted 1989 losses of $40 million, 
has been forced to renege on pledged loans its clients planned to use for takeovers .... Among 
Wall Street's hot new fields is the restructuring of overleveraged companies — an investor 
acquires an ailing property merely by buying up its debt at a much cheaper price. And 
Teddy Forstmann, an LBO king who has long railed against the evils of junk, is starting a fund 
to do something novel — buy a position in a company (as well as a voice) and actually stick around to 
reap the rewards .... For skeptics who think running a company doesn't have all the rewards of an 
LBO, there is the stunning example of Frank Wells. The Disney president made more than 
$50 million in salary, bonuses, and exercised stock options last year. . . . 

Q^£| d AraH^nr^ ^^ ^^^^ '^ ^^^ decade of inconspicuous consumption, 

why must everyone see fit to broadcast just how inconspicuous 
they are? In January, Donald Trump announced that he was "tired of the social scene. I've had 
enough social scene in New York to last me for a lifetime." L.A., however, must be a different 
story — Trump was at the black-tie Scopus awards dinner in Beverly Hills when he made the state- 
ment. . . .Anyway, consumption's still OK if the cause is correct. Susie and Ted Field hosted a 
$50,(XX)-a-table affair in February to save the rain forest. On hand to entertain were Sting, Bruce 
Springsteen, and Herbie Hancock .... Apparently consumption is also OK if you're not old 
enough to know better. Boston's Ritz-Carlton hotel offers a suite just for kids at $395 a night. 
Among its many amenities are Ralph Lauren linens, TV and VCR, stereo, a toy box and games, a 
fridge stuffed with snacks, and a mini terry robe. — ^JULIA REED 

VOGUE APRIL 1990 239 




RALPH LAUREN 



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PHOTOGRAPHY 



ENN ULTIMATE 



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Two exhibitions reveal 
why Irving Penn 
remains a master 
of the distilled image. 
Michael Boodro 
pays tribute 

IRVING PENN'S IS AN ART OF DISTILLATION. 
He imprints forever — on the page of a 
magazine, in the subtle gradations of his 
platinum prints, and most impressively, on 
the mind — the fold of a collar, the bold 
curve of a black hat, the direct stare of a 
world-renowned writer. He etches the im- 
age that defines for us the ideal of high 
fashion, or genius, or a child's stare at its 
most direct and vulnerable. 

It is perhaps because he affords the 
workmanship of a couture gown, a simple 
glass of water, a Parisian glazier, and a 
group of New Guinea warriors the same 
rigorous attention, the same incisive and 
sculptural light, that his images achieve 
such purity, such presence. He places his 
subject before us directly, preserving it, 
offering it to us at its height. If what is best 
about us can be considered our true selves, 
our essence, then Penn presents his sub- 
jects in their truest, best light. 

In recognition of this achievement, a se- 
lection of 120 works, Irving Penn Master 
Images, is being shown jointly by the Na- 
tional Portrait Gallery and the National 
Museum of American Art in Washington, 
D.C., from March 30 through August 19. 
This survey covers the full range of his 
work, including fashion, still lifes, the 
nudes that he has made throughout his ca- 
reer, and his famous large-scale studies of 
cigarette butts and street detritus. Concur- 
rently, from March 30 to April 28, the 
Pace/MacGill Gallery in New York City is 
featuring approximately 100 of his ethno- 

VOGL'E APRIL 1990 




Gesture as charac- 
ter: Penn's memo- 
rable portraits 
Barneii Newman, 
1966, and iessye 
Norman, 1983. 



graphic works, most 
made by means of the 
portable studio he used 
to catch and manipu- 
late his precious north- 
em light. 

It is because Penn looks so carefully and 
clearly, does that hard work for us, that his 
photographs are so instantly memorable. 
After one sees Penn's portraits, the painter 
Balthus remains perennially young and 
cocky; Colette old yet majestic, even flirta- 
tious; Cecil Beaton caped, elegant, and 
slightly disreputable. 

Even when it is most of the moment, 
there is something elegiac about Penn's 
work. He makes for us a permanent record 
of that which is most transitory. But Penn 
doesn't simply document. Under his pa- 
tient, preying eye, his subjects often yield 
more than they intended, become for that 
brief moment in his studio more them- 
selves than they had ever been before. He 
creates for us heroes as we need to remem- 
ber them, and women and fashion more 
beautiful than any that could possibly ex- 
ist. Penn's is a limited world of controlled 
gesture and placement, perfect balance and 
order. It is kept at a distance from us, yet 
resonates forcefully. • 

251 



PutwursdfiJ 








The new Accord Coupe. \bu ha\ e to drKe it to belie\e it. 



HOIVDA. 



JJl 



DANCE 



Combining conservatism and flamboyance, 
Peter Anastos is a choreographer with few 
peers, david daniel probes his contradictions 




Anastos takes a few pointers from ballerina Victoria Hall 
WHEN PETER ANASTOS SAYS HE IS FIGHTING TO 

save an endangered species, he's not talking about the 
snow leopard. He means the ballerina. "Every time I 
see a ballerina," Anastos tells me, "I think of Sunset 
Boulevard. You know, when the guy recognizes Nor- 
ma Desmond and says, 'You were big once. ' And she 
snaps back, 'I am big. It's the pictures that got smaller.' 
We have a lot of fantastically gifted women dancers 
now, but very few star ballerinas. Ballet has gotten too 
small to use them. I ask you, if this is the dance boom, 
why is virtually nobody making big juicy ballerina 
parts anymore?" 
Good question, as they say on the talk shows. So 

254 



what is his answer? For the last fifteen 
years, Anastos has ignored the ortho- 
doxies of modem ballet to make roles 
that renew the traditional image of the 
ballerina as luminous star. The artistic 
director of New Jersey's Garden State 
Ballet since 1987, Anastos has also 
choreographed for some twenty other 
companies, both here and abroad. 
"There's been a failure of nerve in 
choreographers since Balanchine 
died," he asserts. "Everyone be- 
lieves that Balanchine used up classi- 
cal ballet and there isn't anything left 
to do. Sure, there are still choreogra- 
phers who'll put a tiara on a woman 
and stick her in front of a corps de bal- 
let. They give her steps that look like a 
cross between aerobics and ballet 
class. That isn't what makes a balleri- 
na. A woman can have technique, 
glamour, and temperament from now 
till next week. But she's not a balleri- 
na unless she dances material that 
transforms her into one. ' ' 

On Anastos 's stage, you don't iden- 
tify the ballerina according to who's 
wearing the tiara. She's the one who 
invents the world; her dances tell you 
who she is. Anastos 's balletic forms 
and devices are the most traditional 
ones of the eighteenth and nineteenth 
centuries: the dance suite, the pas 
d' action, the pas de deux and varia- 
tions. He invests these with the full in- 
heritance of twentieth-century 
technique, his unique, confounding 
wit, and his impeccable musicianship. 
You can never guess what direction or inflection he 
might give the most conventional step — unless, of 
course, he wants you to. This interplay between the ex- 
pected and the unexpected is the light and shade of An- 
astos's ballets, the source of their felicity. And while 
he's deadly serious about what he's doing, his touch is 
airy and elegant. 

For someone of Anastos 's ultraconservative tastes, 
his entry into the world of ballet was, to say the very 
least, unorthodox. He began his professional career in 
1974 as OlgaTchikaboumskaya, the founder, choreog- 
rapher, and prima ballerina assoluta of the all-male 
transvestite ballet company Les Ballets Trocka- ► 258 

VOGUE APRIL 1990 





First we'll talk, then we'll eat. 
Because sometimes, informa- 
tion is the ultimate appetizer 
And we've got enough 
lean, juicy fects to make 
everyone hungry. So 
forget what your mother 
told you about reading 
at the table. After all, this 
is the age of information. 



CHOLESTEROL: BEUEVEITORNOT. 

We happily report that beef has w more cholesterol than 
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76milligramsinalean, trimmed 3-ounce serving. Yes, the 
clacken has less fat, but moderate servings of beef can easily fit within 
leading dietary guidelines. So keep the steak knives handy. 







HOW MUCH OF A GOOD THING ? 

Whether it's beef chicken or fish, we suggest 
a 3-ounce serving size. We also suggest you 
check the ' 'Skinniest Six" below, and trim 
away any fatyou can find. Then be 
moderate, but be happy. 



GENERALU SPEAKING . 

In a recent report, the Surgeon 
General says Americans eat too 
much fat. We agree. He also 
recommends your meats be 
lean. We still agree. Andwe're 
doing leaner 
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feeding and cbser 
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EYEOFROUND 

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155 calories 



TENDERLOIN 
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©1988 Beef 
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SIRLOIN 

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177 calories 




Y S PLAIN. 





NTI -W RINKLE STRATEGY 

HOW MANY STEPS 

DOES IT TAKE TO STOP 

NEEDLESS AGING? 



The evidence is overwhelming that even 
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than birthdays. And it's no secret that 
daily moisture loss makes every little line 
more visible. 

That's why skin specialists say: "Use a 
good moisturizer and an SPF 15 sunblock 
every day of the year." But . . . two layers ? 
Won't they irritate? Clog your pores? And 
if you do wear a total sunblock all year 
round, won't you end up pale as a ghost? 

You'll be happy to know that a leading 
skin care company asked the same ques- 
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the right answers: Neutrogena Moisture* 
SPF 15 Formula with a sheer tint. 

First, it's an effective daily moisturizer, 
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♦Experts say SPF 15 is a total block and higher numbers just 
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ADVERTISEMENT 



DANCE 



dero de Monte Carlo. "I could' ve ruled 
the world as Olga," Anastos recalls 
wistfully. "I was practically worshiped 
as a deity in South America. But after a 
few years of that I knew I wanted to go 
entirely legit. So I announced my fare- 
well to the Trocks in an Egyptian ballet 
called Cheopsiana. I was brought on in 
a mummy case and the corps de ballet 
did a maypole dance around me to un- 
wrap the bandages. ' ' 

Anastos's apprenticeship with 
Trockadero wasn't as goofy a prospect 
as it may seem at first. It is emblematic 
of the amalgam of the conservatism and 
outrage that color both his work and his 
conversation. The aesthetic of Trocka- 
dero under Anastos was not female im- 
personation but impersonation of the 
ballerina. The world and the manners of 
the ballerina were Anastos's subject 
then and have remained so ever since. 
Typically, his latest ballet is a merci- 
lessly funny ' 'biography ' ' of little Mau- 
die Splaytoes, the heroine of Edward 
Corey's The Gilded Bat, who grows up 
to become Mirella Splatova, the 
world's greatest ballerina. Ballet West 
of Salt Lake City will perform The Gild- 
ed Bat at the Kennedy Center in Wash- 
ington, D.C., in early 1992. 

Anastos's ballets are performed 
from Atlanta to Tulsa, from New 
York's American Ballet Theatre to 
Ballet de Teatro Colon in Buenos 
Aires, and he has made dances for 
Shirley MacLaine, Mikhail Baryshni- 
kov, and Elizabeth Ashley. His 
dances can currently be seen in a year- 
long national tour of a new production 
of Tim Rice's musical Chess, which 
will visit more than two dozen cities. 
Now that success has made his ballets 
virtually ubiquitous, I ask him if he 
can bear to recall his worst, most 
ghastly failure. "Oh, my God, yes," 
he says , wincing . "I was asked to do a 
piece for Dance Theatre Workshop in 
New York, so I thought I'd do a send- 
up of all that postmodern perfor- 
mance-art shit I loathe so much. I 
filled the stage with TV sets, rocks, 
and potatoes and dressed the dancers in 
nuclear- waste jumpsuits and gas masks. 
Well, nobody cracked a smile. Not even 
for the middle section, which was female 
mud wrestling. I called it Don't Wave. 
And nobody did. ' '• 



258 



V O G L' E APRIL 1990 



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VIRGINIA m 

YOU'VE COME A LONG WAX BABY 



MUSIC 



With Aspects of Love, 
Andrew Lloyd Webber 

has written his most 
sophisticated musical yet. 

GRAYDON CARTER diSCOVCrS 

it may also be his last 

A PERSONAL REVELATION: ANDREW LLOYD 
Webber photographs small . Or at least smaller than he ac- 
tually is. After years of seeing shots that make him look 
like the West End's prodigy dwarf, one is shocked to dis- 
cover that he is of reasonably normal physical propor- 
tions. In the space of a couple of hours, Lloyd Webber 
can be at once charming and arrogant, funny and self-se- 
rious — he was skewered perfectly in Forbidden Broad- 
way 1990. He speaks in staccato bursts that indicate a 
mind moving faster than lips, and he goes on about one of 
his musicals for ages, using his other hits as his sole out- 
side references. He has also lost a good deal of weight, 
everywhere except his head, necessarily large, perhaps, 
to store both his enormous melodic brain and his well-de- 
served ego. Providing additional proof of the former and 
abetting the latter is the arrival on Broadway this month of 
Aspects of Love, Lloyd Webber's small senti 
mental masterpiece, easily the most sensual 
of all his works and, it turns out, his pro- 
claimed swan song to the musical the 
ater. For the time being, anyway. 

As is the case with virtually all 
Lloyd Webber productions. Aspects 
of Love, with $12 million in advance 
ticket sales, is already a Broad 
way hit, having opened in the 
West End a year ago to robust 
ovations and the warmest 
critical reception of the 
composer's career. ("Sur- 
prisingly bearable" was 
how The Sunday Tele- 
graph of London put it.) 
Now, says Lloyd Web- 
ber, Aspects of Love is 
pulling double what the 
number two musical in the 
West End is taking in . AA 

Refreshingly free of the *^ 
lavish stage effects that are a 
hallmark of a Lloyd Webber spectacular. Aspects 
is based on the David Gamett novel of the same 
name. Gamett was a peripheral member of the 
Bloomsbury group in its heyday and married into 
it during its decline. His novel, set in southwest 

VOGUE A I' K I I. 19 90 




France after the Second World War, is full of the roman- 
tic intrigues, aberrant sex, and bloodless dalliances that 
we have come to expect from Bloomsbury. The book of 
the musical follows the novel closely. The music is pure 
Lloyd Webber. Far and away the most deliciously com- 
plex of all his operatic scores. Aspects is an ensemble 
work with arrangements written for a fourteen-piece 
chamber group rather than the standard twenty-eight- 
member Broadway orchestra. Aspects has, says Lloyd 
Webber, "more music in it, in terms of actual content, 
than Phantom, Evita, and Cats put together. 

Once Aspects opens, Lloyd Webber will turn his atten- 
tion to the film version of The Phantom of the Opera, 
likely starring Michael dawford and Mrs. Lloyd Web- 
ber, Sarah Brightman. It begins shooting this fall in Eu- 
rope with the American director Joel Schumacher and a 
European designer. Lloyd Webber promises it will be un- 
like any other movie. Ideally, he would like to release and 
show it in as few as forty movie theaters around the world, 
and on a theater rather than a movie schedule. "And," 
he says , " it' s going to be quite something . ' ' (And what 
exactly does it say about the Zeitgeist when both the 
top-grossing musical and the top-grossing movie dur- 
ing the last year of the eighties centered on the affairs of 
wronged souls who like to venture out into the night 
wearing masks and capes? Don't ask me.) 

What else is on the Lloyd Webber agenda? An 
original movie opera he plans to do with Steven 
Spielberg, a longtime friend who has an apart- 
ment one floor above him in New 
y"^ ^, York City. Or maybe something on 
^ V_ the late British musical comedy 
^ \V_y star Jessie Matthews, "a total 
look-alike to Sarah," he says. 
Other plans include buying back 
the film rights to Evita from Rob- 
Itigwood and producing 
mated versions of Cats 
and Starlight Express. He 
says that he has always 
been interested in ani- 
mation and had long 
ago wanted to do The 
Little Mermaid as a mu- 
sical animation. "In 
,,v» fact," he says, "it was 
' / who gave the idea to 
Disney." Lloyd Web- 
ber had originally wanted to do Aspects of 
Love as a movie rather than a stage piece, so 
somewhere in all this film busywork he plans 
to act on that desire. Indeed, with a comment 
that will no doubt warm the hearts of critics and 
admirers alike, he says that v/ith Aspects, "I've 
gone as far as I can in the theater for the moment, 
and some strange instinct tells me it's time to step 
aside and develop in another kind of area. ' ' • 



261 



f .' w 



It will change the way you think about Gallo. 

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through cold fermentation. 

The result is aWhite Zinfandel with a deeper, 
more distinctive blush color And a wine that 
captures more of the true varietal character of 
the Zinfandel grape. 

We in^te you to try this delicate wine with 
a most ihti^guing taste. 



^>^fe<->- 



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'E.&J.GalloWinerT.1 



TELEVISION 




JOHN SAYLES HAS JOURNEYED INTO THE John Sayles 
scary forest of commercial TV and avoids the pit- 
sauntered out the other side triumphant. *°"^ °^ televi- 
5/iaAjnon':yD^a/, a new NBC series ere- ^'°" ^''^hes. 
ated by the talented, if sometimes overrefined, movie- 
maker is so good in so many ways that it seems like a 
TV show from a parallel planet — things are almost the 
same, the trees have leaves, there's a burnt-out lawyer 
trying to make a new life just like on our TV. But 
there's something else here, too, something alien. 
What an odd sensation, almost as if we were see- 
ing. . .artistic integrity! God knows John Sayles (di- 
rector of Return of the Secaucus 7, Baby, It's You, and 
Eight Men Out) has always had more than his share of 
integrity, at the expense, most notably, of drama. But 
on television, where drama, or at least its noisy mes- 
sengers — crying, yelling, shooting — have long flour- 
ished like jungle vines, Sayles's little meadow of 
restraint and careful detail plays remarkably well. He 
wrote the pilot and the first two episodes, and Shan- 
non's Deal reveals what someone as disciplined as 
Sayles is, someone with a real sense of narrative — an 
understanding of how characters and language, not just 
events, form a plot — can do with a weary TV genre. 

Jamey Sh:?ridan plays Jack Shannon, once a corpo- 
rate legal shark with a wife, a daughter, a big house, 

264 



Filmmaker John Sayles 
brings candid drama and 
astute observations to 
Shannons Deal. 

I CATHLEEN SCHINE finds 

real substance in this 
network series 

and a gambling problem. Now he sits in a shabby of- 
fice playing poker with himself. "It's embarrassing, 
you doing general law," says one former colleague. 
But for Shannon, his new life is simply a quest for 
decency and repose. Like Bogart's characters, he is 
no crusader, but a reluctant hero. 
"^ Sayles plays with familiar movie and TV types, 
but then manages to skip just beyond cliche's 
reach. When there's a corrupt cop, he doesn't want 
money. He wants Shannon to tutor his son for the 
bar exam. Jack blunders into an Ollie North-style 
weapons-smuggling ring in defense of another cli- 
ent, and finds himself standing in the dust of a 
scruffy South American village as the head of a 
drug cartel practices his golf swing among franti- 
cally squawking chickens. On a bus back in Phil- 
adelphia, Shannon is suddenly grabbed by a 
goon (Richard Edson, the long-faced costar of Jim Jar- 
musch's Stranger Than Paradise). "FBI?" Shannon 
asks. "CIA?" Wilmer the goon shakes his head: 
"lOU." Instead of paying the old gambling debt, 
Shannon convinces Wilmer, the collector, to pay it for 
him. As a loan. With no interest. (That way. Shannon 
explains, Wilmer' s not in comj)etition with his boss.) 
Edson, like all of the show's character actors, is broad 
but easy, a pleasant imbecile trying to build his word 
power at night school. "I've been sent to make certain 
that you honor some of your fiduciary responsibil- 
ities," he mutters ominously. 

Martin Ferrero (he was Izzy Moreno on Miami Vice) 
plays Lou Gondolph, a smarmy, horrifyingly insinuat- 
ing accident lawyer who advertises on TV ("Vic- 
tims!"). But best of all is Sheridan. With his narrow 
eyes, angular nose and chin, and impossibly com- 
pressed mouth, he sometimes seems to be almost 
asleep. Then his tight face tightens further into an iron- 
ic smile, and he's off, his disgust with the world har- 
nessed in the defense of his client, and justice too, 
while he's at it. 

Subdued and unpretentious. Shannon's Deal is also 
eccentric and quick on its feet. John Sayles has been 
"promising" for an awfully long time. Now, on televi- 
sion of all places, he has delivered.* 

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ART 




Few things are 
as ephemeral 
as a stage 
performance. 
Actor and 
director simon 
CALLOW takes a 
look at some 
fascinating and 
informative 
paper 
remnants 



Pavel Tchelitchew's drawing for the program of the 1928 season of Diaghilev's Ballets Russes, TOP LER; a 1925 

whiskey bottle costume for the revue Better Than Nude, TOP RIGHT, by Charles Gesmar; ABOVE LEFT, Edward Burro's 

1950 set for the ballet Don Quixote; and ABOVE RIGHT, a Giorgio de Chirico costume for the ballet Le Bal, 1929. 



THEATRE ON PAPER. 1608-1988. THE EXHIBITION OPEN- 
ing April 7 at New York City's Drawing Center in 
SoHo, has been culled from the huge resources of the 
British Theatre Museum by its unexpectedly contro- 
versial founding director. Alexander Schouvaloff. 
Alex is a shy , dryly humorous man of unquestioned cu- 
ratorial skills, and for theater scholars the museum is 
mecca: impeccably cataloged, sensitively run, quietly 
thorough, and as this show makes clear, full of riches. 
What it h not, however, is theatrical. Schouvaloff is 
known to have balked at the razzmatazz that was ex- 

266 



pected of him by his superiors at the Victoria and Albert 
Museum — perhaps, too, by the public, who has filtered 
rather thinly through the museum's handsome portals 
in Covent Garden, only a few minutes away from the 
Opera House and Drury Lane, the twin pillars of nine- 
teenth-century London theater, and not much farther 
from the West End. With its tasteful display cabinets, 
lovingly preserved costumes, and scrupulously docu- 
mented playbills, the Theatre Museum has suffered in 
comparison with London's new Museum of the Mov- 
ing Image, whose name offers a promise — richly ► 268 



VOGUE APRIL 1990 



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Theater is 

practical magic, 

and here is a 

chance to read 

the recipes of the 

spells 



fulfilled — of instant excitement, a multimedia odyssey through 
film history in which you find yourself at one moment lining up 
for a Lumiere Brothers film in Paris at the turn of the century 
and at the next being Recruited as an extra in a C. B. deMille 
spectacular. 

The Theatre Museum can offer no competition. This is partly 
a result of money — the museum struggles along on a fraction of 
the shoestring that is the budget for its parent, the Victoria and 
Albert. But it is also a question of personal taste (Alex's), and he 
has proved surprisingly fierce in defending that taste — until, that 
is, he was finally forced to resign. 

The storm has put the future of the 
museum in jeopardy while raising 
fundamental issues about what muse- 
ums are for. Are they to be theme 
parks, cultural Disneylands? Or are 
they functions of higher education? 

Theatre on Paper, on view through 
July 21, is very Schouvaloff. Design 
is a hot issue in theater today: is the 
machinery taking over? Are plays and 
actors being swamped by the public's 
insatiable desire for spectacle? These 

issues are not addressed apart from a few reproving words en 
passant in the accompanying catalog. The exhibition presents a 
nonchronological conspectus of theater design from the inven- 
tion of the proscenium arch to the present, arranged under vari- 
ous headings, "Realism and Reality," for example, and 
"Historical, Regal, and Court Costume." The names range 
from the internationally acclaimed to those little known outside 
their own countries , from Picasso ' s costumes for Parade in 1 9 1 7 
to Laurence Olivier' s costume for King Lear by Roger Furse in 
1946. The tone is moderate, reflective, almost anthropological, 
painstakingly attempting to explain the curious ways of these de- 
signer chappies, very much a view from the outside. 

But it is a well-informed view, and the 113 drawings on dis- 
play are of great fascination, often beautiful in themselves (espe- 
cially the costume designs by Natalia Gontcharova, Christian 
Berard, and Leon Bakst), and always suggestive of the finished 
result. They are, above all, work documents and embody an im- 
portant element of the romance of the theater. Schouvaloff in his 
catalog essay says "when all is said and done, the theater is also 
an industry," and that is true enough. But more important, it has 
always been a craft quite as much as it has been an art. It is practi- 
cal magic, and here, in this exhibition, is the chance to read the 
recipes of the spells. 

Schouvaloff places great store by the historical significance of 
these drawings, and he's right that they can tell us more than a 
verbal description or, since the last century, a photograph. Very 
often, as was made strikingly clear in a recent publication, Brit- 
ish Design, edited by John Goodwin, the sets that photograph 
best are by no means the ones that work best. But drawings 
equally are not infallible guides to what happened finally on- 
stage. In the words of the highly articulate American designer 
Lee Simonson: "Drawings for the theater are desires. They 
should all be signed with a question mark. ' ' In the first instance, 
it takes a lot of skill and experience to be able, as it were, to read a 
design, to be able to translate it into space and substance. ►270 



268 



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ART 



Secondly, there isn't a design in existence that hasn't undergone 
some modification during the journey from page to stage. Isolat- 
ed sketches are, in this context, tantalizing and elusive. In a sur- 
vey this wide, the kitid«of detailed revelation of work in progress 
that so distinguishes Frank Rich and Lisa Aronson's book on 
Boris Aronson is impossible — though there are wonderful 
glimpses, like Bakst's detailed costume notes for Hullo, Tango! 

If the breadth of the exhibition precludes deep explorations, it 
nevertheless means that there are startling contrasts. To go from 
Giulio Parigi's magnificently executed cartoon for the set for 
Judgment of Paris, performed at the Uffizi Palace in 1 608, to the 
spare moonstruck scaffolding of Rouben Ter-Arutunian's set for 
Pierrot Lunaire, 1 962, via the haunting Pavel Tchelitchew fron- 
tispiece for the twenty-first Diaghilev season in Paris, 1928, is to 
sample an exceptional range of theater art. The slant is undeni- 
ably British (there is a section devoted ta Gilbert and Sullivan 
operettas), but there are drawings from many countries. And 
Schouvaloff is no snob about what constitutes theater. The terri- 
tory covered extends from court entertainments to ballets and 
operas to show-girl costumes. As in the best personal collec- 
tions, there are quirky choices that give 
great pleasure. The great British car- 
toonist Ronald Searle's design for a 
pantomime in a prisoner-of-war camp, 
for example, is curiously fascinating: 
what can the performance have been 
like? The catalog is fiill of fascinating 
information, ranging from cast lists to 
the provenance of the drawing to quotes 
from contemporary critics, who like 
those today, could be scathing. 

Omissions are inevitable. The Bal- 
lets Russes are magnificently repre- 
sented, but there is virtually nothing from the German theater, so 
Brecht and his great designer Caspar Neher don't figure at all, 
though English designers like Jocelyn Herbert, so strongly influ- 
enced by the aesthetic of the Berliner Ensemble, do. And the 
younger generation of British designers who have swept the 
world with their Cats and Phantoms and Les Mis, John Napier 
and Maria Bjomson, receive scant attention, though I should 
think their work has done more to make the wider public aware 
of design as such than many of the designers represented here. 
Perhaps, however, in Jocelyn Herbert's severe phrase, "If your 
set is applauded when the curtain goes up, you've gone too far. 

That is to deny the whole tradition, richly represented here, of 
Baroque theater, theater of sensuous delight and miraculous 
transformations, of which modem musicals are surely a not-so- 
distant offshoot. Inigo Jones the father of modem theater de- 
sign? Possibly. But another tradition constantly reasserts itself; 
the bare, thespocentric Elizabethan thrust stage, demanding that 
the audience evoke its own sets, its own transformations. Here, 
the designer is a sculptor in space, not a painter of visions. Here, 
the human body, focused and released, whether dancing, sing- 
ing , or speaking , is supreme . Inevitably , Alex Schouvaloff 's ex- 
hibition centers on the decorative, the splendid, the painterly, as 
opposed to the essential, the spare, the sculptural. But its visions 
are thrilling and of extraordinary variety, a paper theater of the 
most ravishing colors. • 



As in the best 

personal 

collections, the 

quirky choices 

give great 

pleasure 



270 



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to 



JOHN LAHR finds Martin Amis's ingenious new 
novel, London Fields, a great act of generosity 




Martin Amis: taking on not only the condition of the planet but the nature of the novel 



THE NAME AMIS, BARELY LEGIBLE, HAS BEEN 
scratched under the bell of a ramshackle Victorian 
house in Netting Hill, a few blocks from the notorious 
All Saints Road, with its drug-dealing villains, and a 
little farther from the louche mix that is Portobello 
Road, where the wealthy and the wrecked bump up 
against each other as they scavenge for pleasure. Mar- 
tin Amis's house has a sense of collapse as imminent as 
that of the exhausted planet he conjures so brilliantly 

272 



with his new novel, London Fields, in which he plucks 
a promiscuous ex-actress, a decent middle-class gent, 
and a "lager lout' ' out of the Portobello bustle and turns 
them into featured players in an exuberant moral horror 
story. "It's a long novel about some sordid goings-on 
around the comer," says Amis, as trim and sharp as his 
sentences. "I wanted the marginal figures seen against 
the background of sordid decline." 

In London Fields (Harmony), Amis is cele- ► 274 



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brating a winded civilization, and one that has sudden- 
ly, mysteriously grown old. "Imagine the terrestrial 
time span as an outstretched arm: a single swipe of an 
emery-board, across the nail of the third finger, erases 
human history. We haven't been around for very long. 
And we've turned the earth's hair white. She seemed to 
have eternal youth but now she's ageing awful fast, like 
an addict, like a waxless candle. Jesus, have you seen 
her recently?'" 

"The planet needed a couple of months in bed," ob- 
serves Samson Young, the American 
novelist narrator of London Fields, who 
arrives in London on the cusp of the mil- 
lennium in search of a subject and finds 
it in a woman looking for someone to 
murder her. It's typical of the entropy at 
play in the universe of this novel that 
she hasn't the will to kill herself. 

The novel creates a climate of deliri- 
um that sweeps the characters into its 
slipstream. The London fields of the ti- 
tle refer not to greenery but to fields of 
force, as Amis writes, "fields of opera- 
tion and observation . . . fields of elec- 
tromagnetic attraction and repulsion 
. . .fields of hatred and coercion." 
These force fields substitute for destiny 
and for motivation . The author follows behind his char- 
acters, compounding their chaos with the high- voltage 
rush of his pinwheeling imagination. 

But Amis is taking on not only the condition of the 
planet but the nature of the novel. "Perhaps because of 
their addiction to form, writers always lag behind the 
contemporary formlessness," says Samson Young, 
who, like Amis, specializes in acid thoughts. Amis's 
characters — the death-hungry Nicola Six, the decent 
but beleaguered Guy Clinch, and the beer-drinking, 
double-dealing, dart-playing slimeball Keith Talent — 
don't so much develop as explode, the debris of their 
actions scattering across the novel's pages. The charac- 
ters careen from chapter to chapter growing no wiser, 
no deeper, no more profound. Their world is a sump. 
"Exactly," says Amis. "I said to my father once when 
I was telling him about. Money [1984], 'It's all about a 
hoax, it's a motiveless hoax, really.' And my father 
sighed. Well, I mean motivation is sort of. . .1 think 
motivation might even be a convention taken from 
the novel which we assume is active in real life. I look 
at the street, I don't see much motivation, just people 
haring about after their drives and desires. Tolstoy 
said, 'We don't develop. Time moves past us, but we 
stay the same.' You adapt; you go through the great 
rites of ageing; but I think you're still a little boy in- 
side. You search for words like 'maturity' and 'bal- 
ance'; but, c'mmon . . . . " 

Amis emerges out of the pages of this ambitious and 
rambunctious book as a kind of literary mutant. "I 
want to go to the center of the world in my novels. I 



Amis emerges 

out of the 

pages of this 

ambitious and 

rambunctious 

book as a 

kind of literary 

mutant 



want to be a player, ' ' says Amis , a respectable English- 
man who has had to look to the imperial confidence of 
twentieth-century American fiction for his model. The 
narrator of Amis's novel is American, and neither the 
novel's rhythms nor its obsession with evil seem partic- 
ularly English. "I think there is a sort of undertow of 
English cadences even though the patina is Ameri- 
can," says Amis, who is married to an American and 
who has since his raid-twenties felt an allegiance to 
such American authors as Cheever, Roth, Heller, and 
especially Bellow. "English novels 
now are novels of decline in that they're 
short and cautious and don't deal with 
the whole of society. I didn't want that. 
I'd had enough of that." Certainly 
Amis's ferocity of attack and promis- 
cuity of interest don't reflect the de- 
corum of his class. He writes like a 
bad boy about bad people. "Keith Tal- 
ent was a bad guy ... a very bad guy," 
begins his introduction to one of con- 
temporary English literature's most un- 
prepossessing protagonists. Cheat, 
rapist, drunkard, philanderer, chauvin- 
ist, ignoramus, braggart, Keith Tal- 
ent doesn't understand his barbarity, 
but Amis does. Says Amis, smiling, 
"Keith is so badly behaved in every department. He's 
so morally dead." 

Yet Amis doesn't just see England today as a 
wasteland; he picks over the waste, a kind of garbage- 
man of letters. Vandalism, observes one of Amis's 
characters, has gone far beyond the English tele- 
phone box, "Vandalism had moved on to the human 
form. People now treated themselves like telephone 
boxes, ripping out the innards and throwing them 
away, and plastering their surfaces with sex-signs 
and graffiti . . . . " This kind of throwaway brilliance 
is rare nowadays in the English novel, and so is 
Amis's manic energy, which makes a kind of hilari- 
ous poetry of the sludge of English speech. 

No one could be sludgier than Keith Talent, whose 
dart-playing fanaticism becomes a metaphor for the 
mindless addictive venality of the times. "What was 
the game?" asks Nicola, courting Keith to kill her: "A 
twenty-stone man threw a twenty-gram nail at a lump 
of cork, while the crowd screamed for blood. Tiddly- 
winks in a bearpit. This was some destiny." But darts 
are Keith's dream of heroism, his anodyne for envy. He 
tries to teach the narrator the game. "You're looking at 
the treble twenty," says Keith. "Nothing else exists. 
Nothing/' And, after catching another competitor tam- 
pering with his darts in a pub comp)etition, Keith kicks 
him senseless in the Gents. Writes Amis, whose own 
well-used dart board is set up in the studio kitchen: 
" 'Not with a man's darts,' Keith kept saying almost 
tearfully, shaking his head. People were bringing him 
brandies. You don't. . .not with a man's ^276 



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His novel struts 

gleefully through 

this minefield of 

embarrassment 

and shame 



darts,' "Keith is a compendium of addictions. He chain-smokes 
(and even offers Guy Clinch's brute of a baby, Marmaduke, a 
drag). He reads the tabloids. He watches TV but at high speed on 
the VCR. ( ' 'What he w^s after were images of sex, violence, and 
sometimes money. Keith watched his six hours' worth at high 
speed. Often it was all over in twenty minutes.") He takes his 
pleasure with women just as hastily and hurries back to the pub to 
brag about it. "When it came to kissing and telling, Keith was a 
one-man oral tradition . " 

Amis has a marvelous word-hoard. He knows a lot about 
words and has fun with language. "Kim and Keith: they were 
men. Men, mate. Men. All right? They wept when they wept, 
and knew the softness of women, and relished their beer with 
laughter in their eyes, and went out 
there when it mattered to do what had 
to be done with darts. ..." In his 
dart notebook, Keith writes, "Clear 
ideas from your head. You do'nt 
want nothing in your fucking head. ' ' 
It's a good joke and typical of how 
carefully Amis matches idiom to in- 
cident. Says Amis, "Keith's lan- 
guage is all secondhand. It's all 
mediated through television and tab- 
loids. It's a horror language without any authenticity at all. 
It's just miserable cliche after miserable cliche. When I was 
writing it I thought 'It's very ugly, this language,' but now I 
see it's sort of poetic." Part of the novel's power is finding an 
articulate way of expressing the frustration of the inarticulate. 
"There is no language for pain. Except bad language. Except 
swearing. There's no language for it. Ouch, ow, oof, gah. 
Jesus. Pain is its own language." 

Amis has many moves and can switch just as easily to the 
jaunty mournfulness that lies behind his unrelenting pursuit of 
t\'\\. London Fields is an ingenious murder story, and it would 
be indelicate to reveal whether Nicola Six gets the violent 
Keith or the ardent Guy to kill her. or whether Amis succeeds 
in ringing even more changes on the events he so shrewdly 
builds. But his novel is a great act of generosity, a capacious 
and intelligent book that announces the author's importance in 
the arena of contemporary literature. "I'm sick of writing 
these clipped, shapely English novels," says Amis, who had 
already written five before London Fields. "I want more of a 
catch-as-catch-can form. If I want to sound off about some- 
thing, I'm not going to worry about whether it really belongs 
there.'' Amis takes the reader into the dark areas of life: per- 
verse sex, murder, violence, masturbation, child abuse. His 
novel struts gleefully through this minefield of embarrass- 
ment and shame. "It's not a desire to shock," says Amis. 
"It's a way of saying, 'C'mon. we're not here for very long. 
What really is going on with people?' In Money, I put it best: 
'We just stand at the entrance to the cave, and strike a match. 
And quickly ask if there's anybody there.' So that's what I 
tend to do. If I see a sensitive subject that isn't much dis- 
cussed. I think, 'Right, let's go for that and see what's really 
happening. ' ' ' That's news, and that's what the novel is meant 
to be. And that's why London Fields is such a properly sensa- 
tional and impressive accomplishment. • BOOKS ► 278 



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JANE SMILEY remarks on the pitfalls of first-person 
writing, but finds in four first novels the rewards 
of idiosyncratic voices telling singular tales 



I KNOW A WRITER WHO ADVISES ASPIRING NOVELISTS 
to avoid first-person narration — too limited, he asserts, 
to tell a great story. Easy advice to utter, but hard to fol- 
low, as these four first novels by women, all written in 
carefully worked-out voices, reveal. But my colleague 
has a point. The pitfalls of writing a whole novel in the 
persona of a narrator who is quite different from the au- 
thor are obvious: a failure of style would allow the mask 
to drop, and break what John Gardner used to call the 
fictional "dream." And a first-person narrator is a 
much more social creature than your average author/ 
narrator mix. God forbid that the reader might find the 
narrator a bit too self-absorbed, or tiresome, or down- 
right unattractive. Reading what he or she has to say 
could get to feeling like a long ride on a full bus — no 
changing seats, no getting off. 

It may be that women writers are more likely to use 
the first person. Charlotte and Emily 
Bronte did, breaking with the prevail- 
ing nineteenth-century convention of 
omniscient and godlike narrators and 
managing to bring a degree of passion 
into their works that shocked but fasci- 
nated contemporary readers. Charlotte 
Bronte felt that the true stories of wom- 
en could only be expressed from a point 
of view that was explicitly female and 
explicitly present in the novel. In the 
American literary tradition, the first-person narrator 
has found yet another purpose — to speak for the mar- 
ginal, the dispossessed, the far away. In a nation with 
many regional accents, formal written English is the di- 
alect of the established, third person its point of view. 
First-person narrators are usually out of the main- 
stream, often subversive. 

We can assume that first-time novelists are like first- 
time parents: their choices are mostly instinctive and 
their innocent enthusiasm blinds them to the risks they 
are taking. They may use a first-person narrator be- 
cause it actually seems easier or more natural to write as 
an "I" or because that is the only way the material 
seems to present itself. So how do these four novelists 
acquit themselves? Should they have listened when 
their teachers advised them to find a more impersonal 
form of narration? 

In Clover (Algonquin), Dori Sanders uses the voice 
of a ten-year-old child to tell the story of a white woman 
who marries into an extended black family. Sara Kate 
loses her husband in a car accident on the day of their 
wedding, but nevertheless moves into his house and 
takes on his child. Clover (who tells the story), and the 

278 



First-person 

narrators speak 

for the marginal, 

the dispossessed, 

the far away 



relatives, gradually working out her differences with 
them over the family business and other, more subjec- 
tive issues. The premise is an intriguing one, and the 
child's voice is lively and engaging. Clover often offers 
bits of wisdom she has gleaned through the years. 
"Like, for instance, among our people in Round Hill 
you don't go asking a widow if she likes the kind of 
flowers you want to put on her husband's grave. You 
just do it. The dead belong to all to remember." She 
also has a good eye for physical detail. But in fact the 
child's voice is very limited. The adults' voices, to 
compensate, turn expository: "My daddy shook his 
head. T didn't even try it. I think we were both aware 
that something beyond just friendship could have de- 
veloped between us, but we consciously avoided the 
possibility. At least I did. The time was not ripe for 
us. . . .So, after college, we went our separate 
ways.' " The story of the white step- 
mother takes place mostly out of Clo- 
ver's view, diminishing the action and 
rendering everything abstract and 
somewhat fragmented. The child narra- 
tor can't explore, except in the most ten- 
tative ways, the racial and personal 
issues that might most intrigue us, be- 
cause they are beyond her gaze and be- 
yond her ken. 

Elinor Lipman's first novel. Then 
She Found Me (Pocket Books), is more successful, al- 
though less unusual. The voice Lipman seeks to realize 
is a comic one . perhaps not so far from the author' s own 
voice. The narrator is April, a high school Latin teacher 
whose birth mother, a narcissistic and almost insuffer- 
ably shallow local talk-show hostess, suddenly invades 
her quiet and rather complacent life with demands for 
intimacy, girlish friendship, and, insistently, love of 
the sort only a talk-show hostess could understand. 
Keenly expressed insights dot the narrative. Of her ear- 
ly meetings with Bemice, her birth mother, April says, 
"She quizzed me on my life in the form of coy ques- 
tions often asked of celebrities in magazine sidebars: 
my favorite color, shoe size, most unforgettable birth- 
day party, last book read. It was only a warm-up, 
though, a stab at intimacy before asking what she really 
cared about, me and men. Me and sex." Even so, 
April's passivity in the face of her intrusive birth moth- 
er, who calls in the middle of the night to talk about 
men, and who thinks of everything in terms of how it 
will play on her talk show, is unexplored. 

One not-so-obvious pitfall of the first-person novel, 
especially a novel heavy with plot, as this one is, ► 280 

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is that the narrator will get lost in the shuffle. Every- 
thing will happen to him or her, and he or she will fail to 
stand up to the events or the other characters. This flaw 
in the action may translate into a failure in the voice. 
April has the charm of a good wit. but as her tale goes 
on and on, she comes to seem more and more self-satis- 
fied. Toward the end, when her rediscovered birth fa- 
ther tells her that she is prettier than her birth mother, 
the reader may wake up from the narrative dream with a 
start and wonder if April's insidious self-promotion 
isn't actually more unattractive than her birth mother's 
more raucous neediness. Still, Then She Found Me is 
readable and charming. 

The premise of Sharlene Baker's Finding Signs 
(Knopf) is the lightest feather of an idea: her protago- 
nist, Brenda, decides to hitchhike from San Diego, 
where she has been working making bets for her broth- 
er at the racetrack, to Spokane. Washington, to be re- 
united with her oldest and most favorite boyfriend. 
Brenda is a gal who can't resist the call of impulse, and 
her trip, lasting a month, takes her north to Washing- 
ton, south back to San Diego, then east to Boston, and 
west back to San Francisco. At last, filthy and almost 
penniless, she comes to Spokane. Her life parallels the 
lives of her almost equally peripatetic friends, except 
that in the course of the month, they manage to couple 



and Brenda manages to avoid coupling. A picaresque 
novel is by nature almost impossible to end, but even 
the most interesting wandering can come to seem aim- 
less. In Finding Signs, Brenda's voice has charm, intel- 
ligence, and depth of feeling — she can talk 
compellingly about many things, fully engaged in a 
way that is the unique privilege of a first-person narra- 
tor. Toward the people who give her rides, she is can- 
ny. She observes them closely: "When he [a man who 
takes her from Boston to Reno] gets back into the car, 
he always does the same thing: throws the sports sec- 
tion of a newspaper on the seat, opens the glove com- 
partment, takes out a Kleenex, wipes off his white 
patent-leather boots, then stuffs the Kleenex into the 
ashtray. At this rate, we'll have to trade in the car by 
Chicago, tops." She does many things without know- 
ing it, including falling in love. The author's sleight of 
hand is to make the reader know Brenda better than she 
knows herself, and to understand that Brenda's desire 
for escape is both deep-seated and justified by her own 
dimly felt sense of grief. Her journey doesn't solve her 
problems or even help her understand them, but it 
serves as an affirmation of a peculiarly American brand 
of hope and trust — hope that new scenes will bring new 
emotions, and trust that everything will turn out well 
enough in the end. 




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You spent a glorious day playingr the fine 
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'A-.: 



In Buster Midnight's Cafe (Random House), Sandra 
Dallas seems to be striving for a quintessentially Amer- 
ican voice, a voice that comes out of an earlier, more 
regionally diverse time. Her narrator, Effa Command- 
er, hails from Butte, Montana, and her narrative is res- 
olutely played out in Butte, even though its stars. 
Buster Midnight, a boxer, and Marion Street, a Holly- 
wood actress in the Jean Harlow mold, leave town ear- 
ly. Effa Commander, now an old woman (she'd scoff at 
a euphemism like elderly), is ready to set the record 
straight on the famous murder that mysteriously in- 
volved Buster and Marion (May Anna to the Butte 
folks). But what the narrator really does is paint a 
picture of working-class life in the early part of this cen- 
tury in hard towns like Butte that is compelling, charm- 
ing, and almost believable. 

Effa's voice is earthy and appealing: "When the 
minister pronounced us man and wife. Pink kissed me 
for three minutes, until the minister drummed his fin- 
gers on the cross. Chick reminded Pink that he was pay- 
ing by the hour, and we could kiss for free at the Rocky 
Mountain. ' ' She establishes a reputation with the read- 
er for unblinking honesty, partly because it is obvious 
that honesty is necessary for sheer survival in a town 
like Butte. It is those who leave to seek fortunes else- 
where who need a scam. For them, though, as for Effa 



herself, the knowledge that someone back home knows 
the truth and can tell it is redemption and the ultimate 
link to sanity. At the novel's climactic moment, when 
Effa is faced with the one truth she can't admit, and the 
reader knows it, and the reader knows Effa knows it, 
her single dishonesty serves to deepen the emotional 
impact of the novel, and causes the reader to regard 
Effa from a slight, but nevertheless affectionate, dis- 
tance. Dallas's novel is a happy one, but Effa's voice 
saves it from being sentimental and, anyway, the read- 
er can't help but be dazzled by Effa's idiosyncratic and 
convincing voice. 

Perhaps this very forgiveness is what a novelist can 
hope to gain in a first-person novel. The idiosyncratic 
voice, telling a unique though possibly smallish story, 
can draw the reader into an irresistible relationship with 
the narrator that can cross the boundaries of class, gen- 
der, region, and appearance that ordinarily divide us. 
Though some may think the purpose of a novel is to tell 
the One Big Story, with godlike authority and distance, 
it may be more important that we, as readers, hear 
many smaller voices telling many singular tales, as inti- 
mate as a friend in the room or a whisper in the ear, re- 
minding us with gentle insistence that we are connected 
to others and we can only survive by imagining what it 
must be like to be someone else. • 




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Some of the best vacations are the ones where you re 
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children were invited to act out what 
happened during the exam using dolls 
and doctor toys; second, by asking spe- 
cific questions, some of which were in- 
tentionally misleading ("How many 
times did the doctor kiss you?"). The 
researchers could then determine how 
many children would not spontaneously 
mention the genital contact — an error 
that, in a legal setting, could return a 
child to an abusive situation. In con- 
trast, if the children who had been ex- 
amined for scoliosis later said they had 
been touched on the genitals, such an 
error could, in an investigation, lead to 
false accusations. 

"The younger children were more 
suggestible than the seven-year-olds on 
general matters." Goodman says, "but 
when the leading questions specifically 
referred to sexual touches, they were 
highly resistant — the five-year-olds an- 
swered accurately 96 percent of the 
time, and the seven-year-olds 99 per- 
cent of the time. ' " The children's errors 
tended to occur on questions that were 



ambiguous or linguistically difficult. 
For example, when asked. "Did the 
doctorever touch you before that day?" 
many children who made errors turned 
out not to understand the concepts 
"ever" and "before." 

Goodman and her associates found 
more errors of omission than false re- 
ports of having been touched: most of 
the children who had been genitally ex- 
amined failed to report it during free re- 
call. Even when asked specifically if 
they had been touched, five of the sev- 
enty-two girls in the study denied that 
they had. "This suggests that children 
need to be given permission to talk 
about subjects they have been taught 
not to talk about." says Goodman. "It 
also suggests that they're unlikely to 
say they have been molested when they 
haven't." 

In similar studies. Goodman's team 
asked leading questions of children as 
young as three after a session of playing 
games with an adult. The children were 
asked whether they were hit, kissed. 




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had their clothes removed, had their 
genitals touched, or had anything 
placed in their mouths — none of which 
had actually occurred. ("How many 
times did he spank you?" "He took 
your clothes off, didn't he?" "He 
kissed you like this [modeling with two 
dolls], didn't he?") 

"The children were surprisingly re- 
sistant to these questions," says Good- 
man. "Every single one of the four- 
year-olds, for example, resisted the 
suggestion that they'd had their clothes 
removed. But more of the youngest 
children, especially those between 
three and three and a half, incorrectly 
agreed with our questions. For in- 
stance, when we asked, 'Did he touch 
you on your private parts?' some of 
them nodded yes. But when we asked 
them what 'private parts' were, they 
didn't know. You have to be very care- 
ful about interviewing kids. You must 
know their words for things and be sure 
that they understand yours. 

This research has powerful implica- 
tions. Goodman believes, forjudges 
and other adults who believe that chil- 
dren are highly suggestible. "If an actu- 
al legal or social-service interview 
included questions like ours," she says, 
' 'the interviewer might face severe crit- 
icism that the child was being led into 
making a false charge." (This, of 
course, is just what happened to Kee 
McFarlane, the social worker who first 
interviewed the children at the McMar- 
tin school.) "But in our studies, we 
weren't able to put ideas of sexual abuse 
into children's heads." 

John Cioffi, the father of two chil- 
dren who attended the McMartin 
school, put it this way \oNightline inter- 
viewer Ted Koppel: "Kee McFarlane 
saw our children for approximately 
ninety minutes when they were three 
and four years old. If she could con- 
vince them that they were raped and 
sodomized and they still feel that six 
years later, she's a hot property." 

What are the effects of playing with 
anatomically correct dolls? Under- 
wager and others believe that dolls with 
prominent genitals are sexually stimu- 
lating to children, and that playing with 
them makes children more likely to go 
along with false reports of abuse. Be- 
cause, in this view, children will ^288 



286 



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287 



MIND HEALTH 



naturally play with these dolls in a sexu- 
al way, a child might seem to be reveal- 
ing signs of abuse when he or she is 
merely revealing signs of curiosity. 

So Goodman's team conducted an ex- 
periment with three- and five-year-olds. 
to see whether playing with anatomically 
correct dolls stimulated sexual fantasies 
or affected memory of a previous play 
session with an adult. "We found that the 
use of dolls in and of it.self does not lead to 
false reports of abuse, even when we in- 
tentionally asked leading questions." 
says Goodman. "For the older children, 
the dolls acUially serv ed as a kind of men- 
tal prop to improve their memories. ' " 

Goodman also videotaped children 
while they were playing with "the dolls. 
Some of the children did manipulate the 
doll's genitals and undress or redress 
the dolls, but under questioning, none 
of them used the dolls to simulate inter- 
course, oral sex, or anal penetration — 
as children who have actually been 
abused do. 

"There is no evidence that children 



fantasize sexual attacks or that they can 
be persuaded to lie about abuse," says 
Goodman. "False charges occur, as 
they do for any crime and for victims of 
all ages, but there is no proof that they 
happen any more often for child sexual 
assault." 

Underwager and other psychologists 
discount Goodman's research on the 
grounds that laboratory studies of chil- 
dren, no matterhow carefully designed, 
cannot reproduce the pressures and 
emotions of a real case. Yet defense at- 
torneys in sex abuse cases cite studies 
on their clients' behalf, too. such as ex- 
periments showing that eyewitness tes- 
timony is often unreliable, that memory 
can be manipulable. and that both chil- 
dren and adults are suggestible. Some 
judges and juries conclude, in exaspera- 
tion, that all studies are equal or that 
studies can be used by anyone to prove 
anything. 

This reaction, while understand- 
able, is unfortunate: a better approach 
is to look at how each study was per- 




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formed and how closely it approxi- 
mates the situation at hand. For 
example, many of the studies on the 
fallibility of eyewitness testimonies 
are based on a quick videotaped scene 
of an event, such as a car crash, that 
doesn't involve the observer directly. 
This research is relevant for testimony 
.about a crime that a witness observed; 
it isn't relevant for a child's testimony 
about whether he or she has been mo- 
lested. Likewise, studies of children's 
suggestibility find that children, like 
adults, are suggestible only about 
matters that don't mean much to them 
or that they don't know much about. 

Ultimately, good research offers 
the best hope of extricating ourselves 
from the thicket of deeply held emo- 
tional beliefs about the nature of chil- 
dren — and the nature of pedophiles. 
"I think this issue comes down to 
what kind of error will be tolerated," 
says Goodman. "Do we really want to 
return to the past, when children got 
little protection and were never be- 
lieved? To avoid this course and still 
protect innocent adults, we need to 
stop asking simplistic yes/no ques- 
tions, such as 'Do children lie?' In- 
stead, we should be trying to develop 
techniques that will help children be 
as accurate, forthcoming, and truthful 
as possible. The techniques must be 
sensitive to a child's age, language 
abilities, and emotional conflicts — 
his or her embarrassment, guilt, fear, 
and divided loyalties. " 

About that case in Miami: just before 
the trial, Ileana confessed that the chil- 
dren's allegations were true. She testi- 
fied that Frank had beaten her into 
submission and threatened the children 
into silence. (The child who said "They 
ate us for dinner" was referring to the 
time Frank decapitated some birds, tell- 
ing the children that's what he would do 
to them if they talked; he then cooked 
and ate the birds. ) Frank, it turned out. 
had a long history of violence against 
adults and children, including his own 
six-year-old daughter, who was found 
to have gonorrhea of the throat. Frank 
was convicted and sentenced to life in 
prison. 

But if Ileana had not spoken out, who 
would have believed the children's pre- 
posterous story? • HEALTHS 290 



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HEALTH AND FITNESS NOTES 



Fiber may help you cut calories 

Getting a lot of fiber at breakfast may help dieters' willpower later in 
the day. Researchers at the University of Minnesota fed high-fiber, 
low fiber, or no fiber breakfast cereals to subjects at 7:30 A.M., then 
measured the calories they consumed at an 11 A.M. buffet. Since the 
high fiber cereals contained about one hundred fewer calories than 
the cereals that were lower in fiber, researchers expected people who 
consumed them to compensate by eating more at their next meal. In- 
stead, they found that the more fiber eaten at breakfast, the fewer cal- 
ories consumed at lunch (between fifty and a hundred fewer). 
Researchers aren't sure how dietary fiber diminishes appetite, but they 
speculate that it slows the emptying of the stomach or that the chemical 
process involved in digesting fiber triggers a feeling of fullness. 



A travelers' fitness guide 

The phrase "fitness to go" has been tossed 
around a lot lately, but for most travelers find- 
ing ways to exercise when they're away from 
home still isn't easy. Help, however, is in sight: 
Fodor's, the respected travel-book publisher, is 
busy compiling a guide to exercise opportuni- 
ties in thirty-five U.S. cities. The book will focus 
on hotel fitness facilities; health clubs that allow 
walk-ins; the best running routes; where to rent 
and ride bikes; where to play golf and tennis; 
and conveniently located sports-supply stores. 
Look for it sometime next year. 



Coffee's jolt can be 
tough on ex-smokers 

Smokers who want to quit should 

know that drinking coffee can 

make nicotine withdrawal even 

more torturous. According to 

researchers at San Francisco 

General Hospital, cigarette 

smokers metabolize caffeine more 

quickly than nonsmokers and thus 

need to consume more caffeinated 

drinks to get the desired ''buzz." 

Within four days of kicking the 

smoking habit, however, caffeine 

metabolism returns to normal — 

and the four coffees they're used 

to drinking suddenly have the jolt 

of ten. The jitteriness caused by so 

much caffeine, combined with the 

anxiety of nicotine withdrawal, 
could sabotage even the best stop- 
smoking plan. Those trying to kick 
the habit, then, might consider 
going easy on caffeine as well. 



A simpler prenatal test? 



Determining the sex of an unborn 
child may soon be as simple as 
testing a pregnant woman's 
blood. Researchers at John 
Radcliffe Hospital in Oxford, 
England, have used a technique 
called gene amplification to 
search for stray fetal cells that 
pass through the placenta and into 
a mother's bloodstream. By 
screening blood samples for the 
presence of cells with Y-chromo- 
some genes (which belong only to 
males), the scientists were able to 
determine the sex of the fetus 
with 100 percent accuracy. 

Widespread use of this tech- 
nique is years away, but research- 
ers say that it could, in some 
cases, be a substitute for amnio- 
centesis or chorionic villi sam- 
pling, both of which can cause 
miscarriage. A number of genetic 
diseases, such as hemophilia and 
some forms of muscular dystro- 



phy, occur almost exclusively in 
males; a blood test revealing a fe- 
male fetus would make further 
testing unnecessary. In the more 
distant future, gene amplification 
could replace more invasive tests 
completely by allowing scientists 
to sample a mother's blood for fe- 
tal genes that signal other inherit- 
ed disorders. 

Of course, no test, no matter 
how simple, can make parents' 
choices easy. Prenatal testing 
now involves weighing the dan- 
gers of the procedure against the 
small likelihood of discovering a 
defect; with testing still limited to 
a relatively small group of high- 
risk women, most parents need 
never face the choice of aborting 
or carrying to term an afflicted fe- 
tus. A blood test with no risk to 
mother or fetus changes the equa- 
tion — without solving the ethical 
dilemmas. 



Pollution alert for exercisers 

While urban exercisers often worry about inhaling carbon monoxide fumes, physiologists say 

that the lesser-known danger of ground-level ozone pollution is much more alarming. In 

laboratory studies, athletes exposed to ozone levels of .18 parts per million of air experienced 

coughing and chest pain after exercise and a 5 to 25 percent reduction in their ability to take a 

deep breath. In 1988, Los Angeles experienced these levels of ozone pollution on 148 days; 

New York City, on 18 days. But ozone, a by-product of auto exhaust, is more than just an 

urban problem, since wind currents often carry the pollutant to rural areas as well. How to 

minimize the danger? State air-quality agencies issue ozone alerts when levels are dangerously 

high: on these days, either skip your run or work out indoors, says Donald Horstman, a 

physiolOf vr at the Environmental Protection Agency. It's also a good idea to exercise in the 

early norning, says Horstman, before commuter traffic causes ozone levels to climb. 



290 



VOGUE APRIL 1990 



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HOROSCOPE 

By Athena Starwoman 



This month the three planets currently In Capricorn (Saturn, 
Uranus, and Neptune) go retrograde (out of phase). From 
April 14 until the end of September, a large proportion of 
the population will be introspective and irrational. High- 
achievement days for April: the three days before and after 
the 9th will be power-packed (particularly regarding rela- 
tionships). 

The Myth of Aries 

According to Greek mythology, the immortal gods of Olympus had 
no competition in the beginning except among themselves. Then, 
without permission, Prometheus created the first mortals, and in his 
own image at that. He fashioned his mortals from clay and gave them 
the gift of life by stealing a fiery ember from the sun's chariot. His 
mortals came to life possessing all the godly attributes of their cre- 
ator. It is believed that Arians, more than members of any other zodi- 
ac sign, possess the qualities (courage, strength, and fearlessness) 
most like those of the ancient gods. 

Aries 

The expression "It never rains but it pours" sums up your April stars. 
This month offers a shower of opportunities encompassing everything 
from travel to career. Yet you must discriminate carefully in choosing 
among such diverse cosmic gifts. Indecision will surface when you real- 
ize you must relinquish something you enjoy to embark on new plans. To 
avoid entanglement in a web of intrigue , make important decisions before 
the 14th. When you desire to invoke drama, restrain yourself. 

Taurus 
April's stars announce your annual new moon on the 24th and 25th. What 
occurs during this moon time generally affects the most social aspects of 
your makeup, so much that it may become difficult to express what you 
are feeling to others. Think of this time as the dark before the dawn. As 
the moon wanes before its renewal on the 24th, your self-confidence and 
energy level may also undergo a temporary loss of brilliance. In time, per- 
sonal clouds will disperse and the brightest sunshine will appear. 

Gemini 
Many Geminis haven't as yet recovered from the unusual intensity of the 
events that have surrounded them since January. This jarring rhythm con- 
tinues unabated, demonstrated by the Geminian ruler. Mercury, becom- 
ing retrograde again from April 23 until May 1 7. It is currently impractical 
and unrealistic for you to attempt to make long-range plans. Too many 
mitigating factors have to be considered. Adopt a day-by-day approach. 

Cancer 
With your talisman planet, Jupiter, providing the ability to overcome ob- 
stacles with integrity, you can approach April's affairs with supreme con- 
fidence. But be alert to the fact that certain situations are highly sensitive. 
Three planets turning retrograde in Capricorn during April will (for better 
or worse) have a strong impact. Their role is to place a mirror of stark real- 
ity in front of your relationships. Expect both upsets and elation as you see 
relationships exposed for what they really are. 

Leo 
As a Leo, sustaining and working toward a clear vision of the future 
comes naturally. This ability is one of your most fortunate gifts and pre- 
disposes you to positive thinking. But there are times, such as this month, 
that demand that you temporarily forget the future and simply focus on the 
present. This applies particularly where finances are already a sensitive 
issue. In April, don't delay or neglect financial situations. It could be a 
case of now or never, as next month may be too late. HOROSCOPE p- 294 



VOGUE APRIL 1990 



293 




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HOROSCOPE 



Virgo 

Even during this auspicious year for Virgos, don't take anything or any- 
one for granted. What occurred last month (under your annual full moon) 
will already have brought this point home. Expect unusual twists and 
turns of fate to occur, but also know you won't be given anything you 
can't handle. Lucky stars are on your side. They will set challenges before 
you designed to motivate and sustain your momentum. 

Libra 
For a long time you have been going through a private struggle, believing 
uncertainty to be your personal demon. But take heart! In the past this cir- 
cumspection has saved you from a lot of anguish too. The fact that you 
instinctively held back was wise. But now the omens of change are sur- 
rounding you. April lOth's full moon in Libra places you. willingly or 
not, center stage. Underplay rather than overplay your role. 

Scorpio 
You are wise to view yourself this month as a spectator, since April's most 
important issues will arise with no prompting from you. This doesn't 
mean you should avoid issues, but does indicate you should choose your 
words shrewdly. By appreciating that you will be dealing with forces over 
which you have little or no control , you will gain control in its most subtle 
form. Resist your inherent Scorpio urge to change things. See how you 
can benefit from situations as they exist. 

Sagittarius 
Don't be daunted this month when long-held plans don't turn out as ex- 
pected. In fact, any disappointment you experience will work /or you 
rather than against you. In April, the Sagittarian trick is to learn to think in 
terms of reverse psychology. View challenges as positive experiences. 
Receive them as gifts given to you during a period when you might be 
complacent or too easygoing for your own good. This month provides a 
chance to dispense with circumstances and people that have been holding 
you back. 

Capricorn 
In April the astrological conspiracy heightens as the planets in Capricorn 
(Uranus on the 14th, Neptune on the 16th. and Saturn in May) go retro- 
grade, rocking the foundations of your current plans. This temporary plan- 
etary imbalance will be felt more intensely than recent ones because it 
occurs just when you have found the confidence to cement certain plans. 
You would be prudent to resolve important issues prior to the 14th and to 
organize your affairs in a way that allows you the freedom to change your 
mind (and you will!). 

Aquarius 
You adore life the most when it goes according to plan, contrary to the 
nature of your sign, which is one of originality and experimentation. You 
love variety within the structure. This month, with Mars (the planet of ac- 
tivity and action) in Aquarius until April 20, you are about to experience a 
touchy period. Pay particular attention to who or what comes into your life 
from March 1 1 to April 20. during Mars's passage through your sign. 
What occurs is certain to be worthy of notice. 

Pisces 
Venus, the planet of love and romance, moves through your sign from 
April 6 to May 4. This love-struck planet's influence fleetingly conjoins 
with Mars (the planet of passion) during that time, making love and ro- 
mantic matters paramount. For those Pisceans without romance, this 
could prove to be a lonely time. As a consequence, you may suddenly be- 
come vulnerable in matters of the heart. Surrendering everything for love 
may also tempt you. Though love, at most times, will conquer all. this 
isn't such a time. Try to be moderate and keep one foot on the ground.* 



294 



VOGl'E APRIL 1990 




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TRAVEL 



the last 



Quentin Crewe 
on the Luberon— 
the secret South 
of France that 
has quietly 
become the 
country^s most 
fashionable area 



• t was a surprise, almost a shock, to hear an an- 
"^ nouncer on the French radio say that mine was the 



most fashionable part of France . 

For countless centuries no one stopped much in 
our valley. The cruel, but efficient, Roman Emperor 
Domitian pushed a road through to Spain in the first 
century. It ran along the north side of a long lump of a 
mountain known today as the Luberon, crossing, as it 
happened, a beautiful triple-arched bridge built in the 
time of Julius Caesar that still stands. That bridge, the 
Pont Julien, was part of an even older route that went to 
Paris and Britain, but no one stopped on that road ei- 
ther. They just passed through. Three ministers of 
state, the radio went on, have houses here, even the 
head of the Communist party. 

Somehow, I had always thought of where I lived as 
lost and secret. My love affair with Provence began 
when I was a child. First the coast, when Saint-Tropez 
was a little fishing port and I believed that F. Scott Fitz- 
gerald was sawing waiters in half on Cap d'Antibes. 
Then when the Riviera became unbearably crowded, I 
came to love the Provence of Cezanne and Van Gogh. 
Misfortune befell that part too. Aix became an industri- 
al town, with flickers of the Mafia from Marseilles; 
Saint-Remy and the troubadour heaven of Les Baux be- 
came thronged with tourist coaches. 

So I took to the valley of the Domitian Way, to the 
hills that look out on that long, lumpy Luberon, and I 
have never been so content. There had been so much to 
learn, so much to see and to do. that I had not noticed 
the encroachment of fashion until I heard that broad- 
caster. Or perhaps I had not wished to see it. 

The Luberoa rises abruptly out of the plain formed 

296 




by the meeting of the Rhone val- 
ley with that of the Durance 
River at Avignon . It is not a high 
mountain, about 3 ,700 feet at its 
highest point, but it forms a bar- 
rier between the South of France 
of the imagination, dotted with 
olive groves and forests of 
Aleppo pines, and the more aus- 
tere northern country of the 
Drome and, at its eastern end, 
the foothills of the Alps. 

Both sides of the mountain 
have, in a sociological way, 
flowered briefly and then sunk 
back into obscurity. To the east 
lies the town of Forcalquier. At 
the end of the twelfth century, 
Forcalquier was a tiny indepen- 
dent state ruled by the Sabran family. In 11 93, Gar- 
sande de Sabran married the Count of Provence. The 
alliance prospered and Forcalquier became the summer 
home of the counts. The town grew until it had a popu- 
lation of about thirty-five thousand. The power of the 
counts was great. An obelisk in the town records that 
Raymond Beranger IV married his daughters to four 
kings — Louis IX of France; Henry III of England; 
Richard of Cornwall, the Holy Roman Emperor; and 

VOGIE APRIL 1990 



/ence 

Charles of Anjou, king of Naples and Sicily. ■ 

Forcalquier is now a town of fewer than four thou- 
sand people. Henry IV pulled down its castle in the sev- 
enteenth century, but some austere medieval houses, 
an old convent, and the remains of the Jewish quarter 
pile up on the hill of the old town round a pretty little 
square with a fountain decorated with carvings of 








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wicked small boys. Although diminished, it is still 
the center of the rugged existence squeezed from an 
inhospitable land of enthralling beauty. 

The soil lies thin on this sharp crust of limestone . The 
steep hills and valleys are covered with scrub oak trees 
or, as one climbs higher, with low bushes of box and 
flowering cistus, although near the summit there are 
fine cedars. With each step, delicious scents of crushed 
thyme and marjoram and summer savory rise ►298 



TRAVEL 



from the ground. Everywhere spiky bushes of rose- 
mary spring blue, and juniper shrubs catch at your 
clothes. Hidden underground are glorious truffles, 
which the locals put into rich omelets. It is a landscape 
of bright colors and subtle smells. And for a backdrop 
there are the high Alps, jagged white with snow. 

Wild boar roam on the slopes of the Luberon, ventur- 
ing down to rootle in the farmers' crops. Partridges strut 
through my garden, while overhead a pair of golden ea- 
gles watch for an inattentive moment to seize their chicks. 
At night badgers waddle up my drive. 

It is the people whose lives have tra- 
ditionally been hard. By nature, the cli- 
mate is arid. Our spring used to run dry 
by the middle of July, and we prayed 
that the water we had saved in our big 
stone cistern would last until the rains 
came. Little would grow on the thin 
soil. The fields were planted with lav- 
ender and the rest of the land was pas- 
ture for herds of sheep and goats. The 
stalks of the lavender are distilled in September to make 
oil for the fragrance industry in Grasse. The goat 
cheeses from the region are famous throughout France, 
and no one has lived who has not tasted spring lamb 
nurtured on the herbs of Haute Provence. 

The damming of the Durance River (and, so the 
wags say, the new swimming pools of the Parisians) 
has changed the climate and the landscape. With water 
for irrigation and subsidies from a government anxious 
to keep the votes of the peasant farmers, the locals can 
now grow cereals, sunflowers, and rape. They are not 
too good at it, so the fields often look scarlet with pop- 
pies and the hillsides can seem like a vast patchwork 
quilt of violet, yellow, red, and green. It is still a hard 
life. Many young people have moved away, and the 
picturesque old farmhouses are sold to sunseekers from 
the States and all over Europe. 

It is this harsher, eastern end of the Luberon that I 
like best, and the people have an attractive fortitude 
that matches the surroundings. During the war, it was 
an area of bitter resistance to the Nazi occupation. Be- 
side the roads are scores of monuments to heroes who 
died fighting for the freedom of their country. 

Much as I love the eastern Luberon, there are many 
delights to the west, though the enchantment is differ- 
ent. Even before one reaches the town of Apt, the val- 
ley widens, and in spring the meadows are filled with 
jonquils; but it is after Apt that the scenery is trans- 
formed. The mountain to the south is still the same, and 
to the north its severity is echoed by the range of Mont 
Ventoux, but in between lies the valley, now broad, 
rich, and u-rtile. Columns of spreading cherry trees, 
and vines stiiched in neat rows in the russet earth, lend a 
gentleness to ;he views from either side. 

The western villages sit proudly independent of each 
other, built for defense on their separate hilltops, each 
one with its particular story reaching back a thousand 



Some claim that 

Rembrandt used to 

send to Provence 

for his deep reds 

and soft ochers 



years or more. Apt, with its twelve thousand inhabit- 
ants, is the largest and perhaps the oldest of the towns, 
but it lacks the charm of the smaller places. The cathe- 
dral at Apt reputedly contains the relics of Saint Anne. 
It is said that Louis XIV's mother, when childless, 
crawled on her hands and knees from the bishop's pal- 
ace to the cathedral to pray for a son. The fact that Louis 
was far more intelligent than the rest of his family gave 
cynics reason to wonder whether or not there had been 
some intervention other than Saint Anne's. 

Twenty-five years ago, most of the 
villages in this area presented a forlorn 
sight. Yet each of them has a number of 
beautiful buildings and an association 
with some aspect of history, religion, 
art, romance, or wickedness. At 
Gordes, during World War II, the dere- 
liction was extreme. By way of punish- 
ing the villagers for the death of a 
soldier, the Germans set fire to the vil- 
lage, blew up several houses, and killed 
thirteen inhabitants. Today, however, the Renaissance 
castle and nearly all the houses have been restored. 

Thirty years ago, a man bought a house in the village 
of Lacoste from the butcher. The price the butcher 
asked was a refrigerator — "not a new one, you under- 
stand, I mean a secondhand one. ' ' Last year a friend of 
mine sold his rather ugly, cramped house there for 
$300,000. It is not a village I would care to live in. The 
people look wary and rather cross. Well they might, for 
Lacoste is dominated by the ruins of the castle that be- 
longed to the Marquis de Sade. Here he held orgies and 
put on dramatizations of Justine and 120 Days of Sod- 
om. In the summer, the marquis would be delighted to 
know, Lacoste is full of beautiful young American girls 
who come to study at a school linked to the Cleveland 
Institute of Art. They, at least, relieve the place of some 
of its sinister quality. 

Real romance had its place at the Fontaine de Vau- 
cluse, where the waters of the Sorgue River bubble up 
from a cave at the foot of a mountain. In the fourteenth 
century, Petrarch, the greatest poet of love, lived be- 
side the Sorgue. Petrarch's famous sonnets were ad- 
dressed to Laura, who, by curious irony, was married 
to a de Sade. an ancestor of the licentious marquis. 

The village of Roussillon also has its literary connec- 
tions. It was here that Samuel Beckett lived during the 
war. When he wanted to go to Avignon, he would walk 
the five miles to the Domitian Way and wait near the 
Pont Julien for a bus. Gasoline was in short supply. No 
bus might come for hours, even a day or two, but Beck- 
ett would wait. A friend of his told me that it was there 
that he conceived Waiting for Godot. 

Roussillon sits in the middle of the Luberon valley. 
Surrounded by pine forests, it rises out of a soil rich in 
color, which has been quarried for centuries. Some 
claim that Rembrandt used to send to Provence for his 
deep reds and soft ochers. It is an odd experience ► 301 



298 



VOGLE APRIL 1990 







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300 



VOGUE APRIL 19 



TRAVEL 



to climb into caves of furious orange or shrill yellow. In 
1950, Laurence Wylie, an American sociologist, chose 
Roussillon to study as an untouched, though not too 
primitive, agricultural society. In Village in the Vau- 
cluse, he describes a simple, traditional people. Their 
family life was close-knit. They were not rich; their 
cars were twenty to thirty years old. Houses in the vil- 
lage could be bought for under $100. 

Today, Roussillon bustles with nouvelle cuisine res- 
taurants, antiques dealers, boutiques. The cars are 
shiny and new, many of them with foreign plates. The 
peasants of the Luberon have welcomed the newcom- 
ers. Indeed, these locals are very different from our 
usual idea of the French. Perhaps because so many 
strains run through their veins — Celtic, Moorish, Ital- 



FORCALQUIER 




ian, Spanish — they exhibit little chauvinism. With the 
big money they can get for their burdensome old build- 
ings, they can build themselves neat new houses and 
buy more land, which is what they really care about. 

An unusual symbiosis has resulted. The rich pour in, 
building their swimming pools, tennis courts, and Ja- 
cuzzis. They are happy, and no one but the occasional 
burglar bothers them. The new restaurants put less on 
their customers' plates, adding only some kiwifruit. 
The vineyard owners stick pretty labels on their bottles , 
which still contain the same not very good wine that we 
used to buy in flagons. The markets sell fancy Proven- 
cal objects that no one used to glance at. No one minds. 

At the same time, the locals live their separate lives 
in perfect contentment. They build for the newcomers, 
guard their properties, serve in their restaurants, and 
then go out for Sunday lunch in the villages that the for- 
eigners ignore. In their own restaurants, they eat twice 
as much for a quarter of the price. In the autumn, when 
the visitors have migrated home, they put on their leg- 
gings and furry caps and disappear into the woods to 
shoot at anything that moves (often each other). Their 
lives are geared to the seasons and are based in the soil. 
It is still the life they have always led. 

It does not trouble them one bit if this is the most 
fashionable part of France. They, like me until I heard 
that broadcast, probably haven't noticed.* 



Inside the Luberon: 
a traveler's guide 

Stretching across two departements (Vaucluse 
and Alpes-de-Haut-Provence) of southern 
France, the Luberon has the cachet of a private 
club. No one who weekends here says, "We're going 
to Provence' ' or "We're going to the Vaucluse. ' ' They 
just say ' 'the Luberon. ' ' Adding to its exclusivity is the 
fact that, even though half of the French population 
doesn't know exactly where it is, the Luberon has defi- 
nite legal boundaries. That's because much of the area 
is under government protection as a Pare Naturel Re- 
gional. Thus, there are those who live in and those who 
(alas) live outside the Luberon. 

For outsiders — and that includes travelers — the Lu- 
beron can be elusive. There are no grandiose museums 
or fabulous chateau hotels, no beaches or shopping 
centers. The biggest attractions of the area are its wild 
beauty and its douceur de vivre. These are reasons 
enough to go. And if you're going from Paris, you will 
have the added thrill of traveling on the TGV, the 168- 
mile-an-hour Train a Grande Vitesse that streaks down 
to Avignon in a mere four hours. 

As you walk through the first-class compartments of 
the TGV on a Friday night, many of the people you see 
are members of what has come to be known as la 
gauche caviar — the comfortable, left-wing, intellectu- 
al yuppie class that has helped turn the once-rural Lu- 
beron into the swimming-pool capital of France. If, 
unlike them, you don't have a 4 x 4 waiting for you in a 
garage at Avignon, Avis can fix you up with a rental car 
at the station. From Avignon, it's a forty-five-minute 
drive down the N-lOO, which on Friday nights looks a 
lot like Le Mans, to the magical Calavon River 
valley — the beginning of the Luberon. 

On Saturday mornings, the only place to be in the 
Luberon is the marketplace under the sycamore trees in 
the town of Apt. Here you'll find fresh olive oil, basil, 
lavender, smelly cheeses, and warm bread. Here, too, 
you'll be able to have a leisurely Luberon lunch of 
sweet Cavaillon melon, local leg of lamb or wild boar 
with plump eggplants and tomatoes, and lots of light, 
fruity Luberon wine. As you dine, you may hear the 
nouveaux Luberonnais discussing weighty matters 
such as building swimming pools that look like water- 
ing troughs, designing aromatic gardens the way the 
Florentines did during the Renaissance, or finding a 
good do-it-yourself book on restoring eighteenth-cen- 
tury furniture. Actually, you can probably find the lat- 
ter at Librairie Dumas, right on the marketplace. 
Besides offering books, the owners. Marc Dumas and 
his charming wife. Marguerite, give tips on everything 
from the latest little-known literary masterpiece to the 
best hiking paths for finding wild mushrooms. 

You'll also want to visit Bonnieux, where French 
culture minister Jack Lang and movie actor Daniel Au- 
teuil (who met his companion Emmanuelle Beart ► 302 



VOGUE APRIL 1990 



301 



TRAVEL 



while filming Manon des Sources not 
far from here) have both bought and to- 
tally transformed houses Like many 
villages in these hills, Bonnieux is a lab- 
yrinth of narrow cobblestone streets 
glued to a cliff. On all sides, tile roofs 
slanted every which way give off hun- 
dreds of shades of red and ocher. At 
night, as you drive through the valley, 
you will see the lights of these villages 
winking back and forth at one another. 

At Gordes, you'll find a Renaissance 
chateau with a Vasarely museum in- 
side. Also, there's the unexpectedly 
beautiful twelfth-century Abbaye de 
Senanque, a working Cistercian abbey 
wedged into a lavender- filled canyon. 
While at Gordes, you can have lunch at 
one of the restaurants on the slightly-too- 
perfect Place du Chateau. Don't be put 
off by the ice cream and Coke stand out- 
side Comptoire du Victuailler, be- 
cause inside is an excellent (if pricey) 
traitteurlpdtisserielbistro with fabulous 
chocolate cake; phone 90-72-0 1-31. 

West of Gordes, the town of L'Isle- 



travel 

GUIDE 



Wbere to Oo 

1 n TRANCJE: General brochure including informauon 
on Le Lub6ron from The French Government 
Tourist Office. 

Whera to Stay 

an BOCA RATON RESORT » CLUB 

Bxa Raton, Florida 

8D HARTWELL HOrrSE 

Buckinghamshire, England 
4D OCEAN KEY HOUSE 
Key West, Florida 

6 D THE PEBBLE BEACH RESORTS 

Pebble Beach, California 

6D THE WESTIN KAUAI AT KAUAI LAQOONS 

Kauai, Hawaii 

Travel Planning and Touring 

7 n AVIS EUROPE: "Super Value" brochure including 

rates for the leisure traveler, plus "In-touch" 
services brochure listing all value added beneflte. 

8 n TRADESCO TOURS: Detailed brochures including 

schedules, costs and accommodations in Austria 
and Hungaiy; Vienna and Budapest by hydrofoil; 
and spas of Europe. 
Please check the brochures you would like to receive 
and return this coupon to VOOUE, April Coupon, P.O. 
Box 1606, Rlverton, NJ 08077-7206, Before August 1, 
1990. Please enclose $ 1 .00 check or money order to 
cover processing. Offer good only in U.S A and Canada. 
Allow at least six weeks l"or processing 



NAME. 



ADDRESS. 
CITY 



-ZIP. 



STATE 

We're sorry, but VOOUE cannci answer any personal 
questions or requests. 



sur-la-Sorgue is completely surround- 
ed by the moats of the Sorgue River; it 
attracts with its charm, its antiques 
shops, and on Sunday one of. the best 
flea markets in France. 

Back in Bonnieux, take the zigzag- 
ging D-36 down to Lourmarin through 
the spectacular Aiguebrun valley. 
Here, many wealthy residents of nearby 
Aix have sprawling houses. Here, too, 
is the Renaissance Chateau d'Ansouis 
in the tiny town of the same name. 
Home to the Due de Sabran-Ponteves, 
this magnificent chateau, with its for- 
mal gardens, is open to the public every 
afternoon but Tuesday from 2:30 to 
6:00 P.M. The chateau's treasures in- 
clude a sixteenth-century canopy bed 
sculpted with scenes of Moses parting 
the Red Sea, and embroideries from the 
coronation stole of Charles X. Nearby 
Lourmarin and Cucuron are also 
worth visiting for their churches. 

Another picturesque drive is along 
the N-lOO from Apt east to Forcalquier, 
where the foothills of the Alps begin. 
Wonderful, unspoiled rural villages 
such as Saint-Martin-de-Castillon, 
Saint-Michel-rObservatoire, and 
Auribeau lie just a few kilometers off 
the highway. Closer to Forcalquier, in 
the little-known village of Mane, the 
Romanesque abbey Notre-Dame de 
Salagon stands humbly in the middle of 
a field. Nearby, the eighteenth-century 
Neoclassic Chateau de Sauvan is a 
mini-Versailles, with handsome eigh- 
teenth-century interiors. Open Sunday 
to Friday from 3:00 to 6:00 P.M. 

Within the city of Forcalquier, an 
unusual cemetery is classified as a his- 
toric monument because of its sculpted, 
ten-foot-high arcaded hedges. For 
good, simple food, try the Cafe du 
Commerce on the main square. 

According to Luberon gossip, the ho- 
tel La Bastide de Gordes in Gordes 
was given to its blond Marseillaise 
owner by her parents in order to keep 
her busy. And it certainly must, with 
eighteen spacious (for France) rooms 
with large bathrooms, a vaulted dining 
room with a terra-cotta floor and refined 
cuisine, a pool and sauna dug into a 
cliff — all in an eighteenth-century 
house with a sensational view of the val- 
ley. Some people complain about the 
modem decor of the guest rooms, but 

302 



each one, done in discreet pastels, is 
more comfortable than those in some of 
the local hotels that try too hard to be 
"Provencal." Approximate rates: from 
$60 to $ 1 50 for a double room on the 
village side of the hotel, and from $125 
to $200 for a valley view. Write: Bas- 
tide de Gordes, Le Village, 64220, 
Gordes, France; phone: 90-72-12-12. 

L'Aiguebrun in Bonnieux has just 
nine bedrooms, and its owners have no 
intention of adding more. Anne Ferraris 
was working sixteen-hour days as a 
commodities broker in Geneva while 
Daniel Studhalter was running the 
kitchens of a local restaurant called 
L'Escapade. Together, they decided to 
give it all up, start a family, and buy a 
country inn in the Luberon. The bed- 
rooms of their newly reopened L'Ai- 
guebrun are pleasant and airy with 
terra-cotta tommettes floors, rustic 
dark-wood furniture, sophisticated 
touches of antiques, and a bit of modem 
art here and there. It's too bad that the 
bathrooms are still in the dreary 1970s 
style of the previous owners, but reno- 
vations do take time. 

The restaurant at L' Aiguebmn has al- 
ready made the grade in the Bonnieux 
area, which is not easy given the fin- 
icky, cosmopolitan clientele. In a glass- 
enclosed dining room overlooking a 
cascading river in the woods, you dine 
on excellent fricassee of wild mush- 
rooms or foie gras fried very lightly 
with raspberry vinegar. The market- 
fresh menu changes weekly. The in- 
credible part of the story is the low 
price: the fixed menu is about $35 but 
will probably not stay that way for long. 
Room rates are also a bargain: from 
around $78 to $85 for a double; $ 105 to 
$1 10 for a four-person apartment. 
Write: L'Aiguebrun, 84460, Bon- 
nieux, France; phone: 90-74-04-14. 

Perhaps the best way to discover the 
Luberon is by renting a villa or farm- 
house. Contact Immobiliere du Cha- 
teau, Rue de la Combe, 84220, Gordes, 
France; phone: 90-72-12-16; fax: 90-72- 
08-54 . . . and Immobilier Village, 3 1 
me Pasteur, 84460, Bonnieux, France; 
phone: 90-75-83-27; fax: 90-75-89-05. 
Prices for the smart season (June I to Sep- 
tember 30) range from $2,000 to $ 1 6,000 
per month. — GREGORY ROWE 

TRAVELS 304 

VOGUE APRIL 1990 



YOUVE SURVIVED TRAINING BRAS, BIKINI WAXING, 

PUBERTY, FLOWER CHILDREN, PANTYHOSE, 

THE CANCELLATION OF PETTICOAT JUNCTION, 

HOT PANTS, MOONIES, RED DYE #5, 

INEXPLICABLE MOOD SWINGS, TOFU, 

SURIY SALESMEN, 1968, 



AEROSOL CHEESE & THE LAUNDROMAT. 



Havent you suffered enough? 




NATURALIZE R. 

The Soft Shoes Collection. Shoes with extra padding, extra flexible soles 

AND EXTRA SOFT LEATHER. BROUGHT TO YOU BY NaTURAUZER. AnD NOT A MOMENT TOO SOON, 

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^j>lBrWi^Sho>Compory 



TRAVEL NEWS 



By Richard Alleman 





Bike tights: Burgundy vineyards, ABOVE; Loire signpost, RIGHT. 

Louis XVIII slept here 

Another of England's historic country 

estates, Hartwell House, has been 

restored and turned into a luxurious 

hotel. Built between the sixteenth and 

eighteenth centuries, Hartwell House was 

renowned in the early 1800s as the 

residence of the exiled French king Louis 

XVIII. Today the hotel remembers its 

French connection with a Troisgros- 

trained chef and thirty-two guest rooms 

each named after one of Louis's 

entourage. Set on seventy lush acres in 

Buckinghamshire, the hotel is less than 

an hour from London and about a half 

hour from Oxford. Rotes begin at $190 

a couple, including early-morning tea, 

newspaper, and Value Added Tax. For 

reservations/information, contact 

Prestige Hotels at (800) 544-7570. 



Chateaux cycling 

"Fitness and indulgence 
can — indeed will — be compat- 
ible!" is the philosophy of 
Chateaux Bike Tours. Special- 
izing in luxury bicycle tours of 
Europe, this Colorado-based 
company plots eight- and 
nine-day trips that include 
chdteau hotels, Michelin- 
starred restaurants, private sight-seeing, and wine tastings. 
Routes cover the Loire Valley, Burgundy, Alsace, Provence, 
and the Dordogne in France; Tuscany; Switzerland. Trips cost 
from $1 ,895 to $2,125 and are rated according to difficulty. 
There's also an easy new five-day spin through the Loire at 
$1,045. Seepage 302 or call (303) 393-6910 for details. 




High dining: Hartwell House 



Danube deal 

One of the best bargains in 

Europe is Tradesco Tours' 

one-week Vienna/Budapest 

package that includes a 

room with breakfast for 

three nights in each capital 

plus a hydrofoil cruise 

between the two cities. 

Prices range from $639, 

double occupancy, for stays 

in deluxe properties like 

Vienna's Imperial and 

Budapest's Forum to a mere 

$383 for tourist-class 

hotels. See page 302 or your 

travel agent. 



// 



For traveling light, Louis Vuitton's 
Keepoll Bog" comes in four sizes, 
six colors (fauve shown here), and 

costs from $640 to $790. The 
embossed leather duffel is part of 
the sleek new^-^^Pi Collection, 
available ^^mf^w^ Vuitton 
boutiquesMlf km nationwide. 



304 





Rial pilgrimage 

Fans of the legendary French singer Edith Piaf 
might wish to stop by the tiny Piaf museum in the 
Paris neighborhood of her youth, not far from her 

tomb in P^re-Lachaise. Among the Piaf 

memorabilia on view at 5 rue Crespin-du-Gast are 

costumes, posters, photos, gold records, and 

kitschy souvenirs. Open Monday-Thursday 

afternoons; call first: 43 55 52 72. 



VOGIE APRIL 1990 



Winter 7» 
Summer 82 



iiieies less iivdn a o r uiiierence 
in temperature from winter to 
summer in the United States 
Virgin Islands. The average 
mean temperature of summer is 
82°F - with soft trade winds, too. 
And our summer rates are as 
beautiful as our summer weather 
—with prices as much as 40% less 
than those of winter. See your 
travel agent. 



StCroix St.John StJliomas 

The American paradise. United States Virgin Islands 

© 1990 USVI Division of TburiBm: Atlanta. Chicago, LA, Miami, NYC & DC, 




-aJ V 




\ 



^r^ 



FOOD 




The casual 
atmosphcr* of 
Michtl Rostang't 
Bistrot d'a Cdti 
on the avtnu* 
Guitave 
Flaubert, LEFT, 
with its rolled 
napkins and 
chalkboard 
menus, ABOVE, is 
typical of the 
new spin-off 
restaurants 
opened by some 
of Paris's most 
noted chefs. 



In Paris, Jeffrey steingarten visits bistros old and 
new. He finds wonderful and innovative cooking 
and famous chefs-but not always at the same place 



It was a quick walk to [Brasserie] Lipp's . . .the beer 
was very cold and wonderful to drink. The pommes ^ 
I'huile were firm and marinated and the olive oil deli- 
cious. I ground black pepper over the potatoes and 
moistened the bread in the olive oil. After the first heavy 
draft of beer I drank and ate very slowly. When the 
pommes ^ I'huile were gone I ordered another serving 
and a cervelas. This was a sausage like a heavy, wide 
frankfurter split in two and covered with a special mus- 
tard sauce. 

I mopped up all the oil and the sauce with bread and 
drank the beer slowly until it began to lose its coldness 
and then I finished it and ordered a demi and watched it 
drawn .... 

. . . This is how Paris was in the early days when we 
were very poor and very happy . 

Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast 

IN THE GATHERING DUSK. I STOOD ON THE SIDEWALK AT 

27, rue de Fleurus, near the Luxembourg Gardens, and 
peered up at the apartment where Gertrude Stein lived be- 

306 



tween the wars with Alice B. Toklas and where she wel- 
comed Hemingway when he was twenty-two. I 
wondered whether his cervelas and potatoes were as 
good as they sounded, and how he could write so vividly 
about food without adjectives, adverbs, or commas. 

The icy rain made little rivers on my eyeglasses, and 
soon I could hardly make out Gertrude Stein's apartment 
on the rue de Heurus or even the rue de Fleurus itself. So I 
followed Hemingway's route down to the Boulevard St.- 
Germain and met a friend, and we spent $90 on dinner at 
Brasserie Lipp — a pitcher of indifferent Riesling, a ba- 
guette made of Wonder bread, a dozen weary oysters, 
and a moronic choucroute cowering under a vast sheet of 
tasteless ham. Seventy years have passed since Heming- 
way walked down to Brasserie Lipp, but his picture of life 
in the bars and bistros of Paris still has amazing power. I 
return to the Lipp on almost every visit to Paris and am 
always disappointed. 

This year is the crucial 225th anniversary of the inven- 
tion of the restaurant, at least the French restaurant, and I 
celebrated the event by traveling to Paris and din- ► 308 

VOGIE APRIL 1990 







BACARDI 
BURSTS 




• i 



BUBBLE 

IN TASTE 

TEST. 



And we did it in head-to-head 
competition. 

We went directly to vodka & tonic 
drinkers, in vodka's top ten markets. And 
in a blind taste test, more than half of 
them chose the taste of Bacardi® rum & 
tonic over their usual vodka & tonic. 

Amazing? Not really, when you 
consider how the smooth, lively char- 
acter of Puerto Rican rum goes so well 
with the bubbly refreshment of tonic. 

So make your own taste test. And 
see how the taste of Bacardi rum & tonic 
makes small potatoes of vodka. 




Bacardi rum. Made in Puerto Rico. 






RUMS OF PUERTO RICO 




FOOD 




ing at twenty of them. 
(Last year I marked the 
less crucial 224th anni- 
versary in much the same 
way, though on a more 
modest scale.) For it was 
in 1 765 that a soup seller 
named Boulanger hung 
out his sign, Boulanger 
debit des restaurants di- 
vins ("Boulanger serves 
heavenly, fortifying 
soups"). His shop was 
known as a bouillon, not 
a restaurant, which then 
meant a r^5rorative broth 
and not the place you eat 
it in. (The last bouillon 
disappeared in 1955, 
when the Bouillon Buci 
in the rue de Buci on the 
Left Bank closed its 
doors.) Boulanger' s in- 
novation was to add more 
solid fare to his soup- 
kitchen menu. The Paris caterers' guild, whose members 
sold only take-out food and only in extremely large por- 
tions, sued him for poaching, as it were, on their monopo- 
ly. Boulanger triumphed and became the toast of Paris. 

My celebration of Boulanger' s famous victory had two 
main themes — to find out more about a new restaurant 
called Amphycles and to get up to speed on bistro devel- 
opments in Paris. I am convinced that the great two- and 
three-star restaurants of France, when they are at the top 
of their form, represent a pinnacle of human artistic 
achievement that makes the contents of the Louvre look 
pretty silly by comparison. But as these pinnacles can set 
you back $200 a person, the savvy eater must seek out 
perfection of a different sort in the cuisine bourgeoise or 
spot the two-star of tomorrow. 

Bistro Update 

The high priests of haute cuisine are muscling in on the 
bistro business. It all started three years ago when Michel 
Rostang opened the Bistrot d'a Cote — literally, the bistro 
next door — on the rue Gustave Flaubert, adjoining his ex- 
cellent two-star establishment, Michel Rostang. Success 
came instantly. Soon another Bistrot d'a Cote followed, 
on the avenue de Villiers, and a few months ago a third, in 
the suburb of Neuilly. Meanwhile, Guy Savoy converted 
the storefront across the rue Troyon from his celebrated 
restaurant into the first Bistrot de I'Etoile, with a second 
on the avenue Niel arriving soon after. Unable to sit still, 
Jean-Pierre Vigato, whose Apicius is among the most 
brilliant of the two-stars, founded Manufacture just be- 
yond the southwest boundary of Paris in Issy-les-Moulin- 
aux. Whereupon Claude Terrail, a day after all of France 
celebrated the 200th anniversary of its Revolution, 
sprang La Rotisserie du Beaujolais on a hungry public a few 



At Amphycles, 
one of the most 
acclaimed new 
Paris restaurants, 
chef-owner 
Philippe Groult, 
BELOW, constantly 
creates inventive 
new dishes, 
including his 
"rizotto" with 
lobster, LEFT. 





doors down the Quai 
de la Toumelle from 
his Tour d' Argent, the 
most famous restau- 
rant in the world. 

Each spin-off bis- 
tro has the same mis- 
sion — to give valued 
customers a place to 
eat when they want 
something simpler, 
quicker, and more re- 
laxed, and to bring fine food to a wider public. If the pub- 
lic unfairly imagines that it can now have the cuisine of 
Tour d' Argent or Guy Savoy for $40, this is a hope that 
the owners themselves have invited. Only Manufacture 
lives up to the promise (20, esplanade de la Manufacture 
[30, rue Ernest Renan], 92130 Issy-les-Moulineaux; 40 
93 08 98 [metro Corentin Celton dir. Mairie d'Issy]). 

The name literally means "factory." and this large 
loftlike space, once used to make tobacco, would be at 
home in Tribeca or SoHo. The walls and beamed ceiling 
are a soft cream, the handsome fixtures have a retro 
charm, the wide expanses are domesticated with abstract 
and Surrealist paintings. The atmosphere is calm, cool, 
and stylish. Manufacture's wine list ofseventy choices is 
unusually thoughtful and inventive, with half the bottles 
under $20 (many are available in demis), and all worth 
drinking. David Van Laer, who was Vigato's second-in- 
command at Apicius, does the cooking, and it is modem, 
hearty, and personal at the same time. We started happily 
with a saute of frog's legs and snails, and a fricassee of 
wild mushrooms, mopping up the juices with ex- ►310 



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308 



VOGIE APRIL 1990 






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FOOD 



cellent bread, then moved on to the escallops of salmon 
and the oxtails en crepinette (which were not shamed by 
memories of a version from the three-star L' Ambroisie 
some years ago) served with thin golden slices of potato, 
sweet and barely browned in clarified butter. Spicy roast- 
ed figs made an excellent dessert, more interesting than 
the pain perdu — French toast is what we call it here — but 
the roasted apple and fine vanilla ice cream with it and the 
scrumptious petits fours that followed set everything 
right. People tell me that the pig's foot sausage or the cro- 
quette of beef marrow would have left me just as content- 
ed. Our check came in at just under $50 a person, 
including service and a wonderful bottle of young red 
Saint-Romain burgundy for $25. 

The other spin-off to which I would gladly return is Mi- 
chel Rostang's Le Bistrot d'a Cote (Flaubert) ( 10, rue 
Gustave Flaubert, 75017 Paris; 42 67 05 81). He has 
transformed what was not long ago a dairy shop — the 
sign for oeufs, beurre, and fromages is still painted on 
the large windows facing the street — into a charming 
room just this side of cute. There are stone floors and mar- 
ble tables, walls and ceiling painted pumpkin and mauve, 
shelves of crockery and what appears to be a complete 
collection of the Guides Michelin. Rostang pxjps in at ev- 
ery meal, and the cooking shows his hand. The menu is 
Lyonnaise home style with touches of Provence and Gre- 
noble (the Rostang family's other seats), some items up- 
dated with curry or pasta or basmati rice. On several visits 
we loved the tartare of lieu (pollack), sharply flavored 
with capers, onions, red [xpper, and cloves, set on a pond 
of olive oil, tomatoes, and basil; bundles of lamb tripe 
with noodles; crusty macaroni with ham; a warm salad of 
lentils and cervelas; a classic salade frisee\ and the rasp- 
berry clafoutis. The baguettes were crisp and yeasty, the 
atmosphere Jolly, and the waiters, in black aprons and 
bow ties, appropriately harried, though you wonder why 
nobody noticed, before I did, that my creme brulee was 
completely liquid, and why they tried to charge me for it 
anyway. Despite a one-page wine list that seemed over- 
priced, our check came to less than $45 a person. The 
menu at Rostang's Bistrot d'a Cote on the avenue de Vil- 
liers is identical, but the place seemed more cramped, the 
staff even more rushed, and the decor less remarkable. 

The virtues of La Rotisserie du Beaujolais (19, quai 
de laToumelle, 75005 Paris, 43 54 17 47) are that it buys 
the finest ingredients — cheese from Ren^e Richard in Ly- 
ons, fowl from Bresse, all ten Beaujolais crus from 
Georges Duboeuf — that it is open all day Sunday, and 
that the average check is $32. But the showpiece rotisser- 
ie bums gas instead of the aromatic woods you still find at 
some Paris restaurants, the cooking is thoroughly lacklus- 
ter (except for my juicy lamb shoulder), the bread lacks 
taste, the place is cramped and noisy, the decor is charm- 
less, they dv-in't take reservations (except, I've heard, 
from friends of the house), the tables wobble on the un- 
even tile floor, the chairs are uncomfortable, many of the 
desserts are bought elsewhere (including a flan supplied, I 
think, by the Goodyear Tire Company), and a boisterous 



Danish couple knocked over my Evian . Even the best $ 1 2 
bottle of wine I can remember buying in a restaurant, a red 
Chateau Grande Versane 1983, would not lure me back. 

EspeciaUy when you can choose among ten or fifteen 
traditional bistros that have endured for a generation or 
more, little national treasures whose owners still cook un- 
changing family recipes and whose waiters have been 
there forever. Two favorites from my 225th anniversary 
trip are Moissonnier and Chez Philippe. 

Thirty years ago Louis Moissonnier couldn't wait for 
his parents to relinquish their Jura-Lyonnais restaurant in 
the 6th arrondissement, so he opened his own in the 5th 
and named it after himself, Moissonnier (28, rue des 
Fosses St.-Bemard, 75005 Paris; 43 29 87 65). Sunday 
lunch in the sunny two-story place a block up from the 
Seine was a time for fifty regulars (plus the two of us) to 
relish the rosy slices of warm garlic sausage and buttery 
little yellow potatoes and to wash them down with a $10 
carafe of the house wine. And to eat forever from the sa- 
ladiers Lyonnais — a dozen open bowls and crocks 
wheeled to our table on a wooden cart. First you taste a bit 
of everything, and then you dig in for more of the sa- 
vory lentils and the red cabbage in vinegar and oil, a few 
more pieces of herring in brine, some tripe or calfs feet in 
perfect mayonnaise (this is a world where there is only 
perfect mayonnaise), and tiny white pickled onions or a 
slab of poached bacon — everything with strong, deep, fa- 
miliar tastes, cooked early that morning or the day before 
and allowed to come slowly to body temperature. We 
saved room for a whole young chicken with crackling 
skin in a sauce of ruby vinegar and a thick, cheesy potato 
gratin, and for slices of sweet salted pork with lentils. The 
cheeses were fine specimens from the Jura — a blue called 
Gex, a sweet and nutty Gruyere-like Comte, and a pun- 
gent, gooey Cancoillotte. Too bad the bread wasn't bet- 
ter. Desserts were aWfaites maison, comforting things 
like creme caramel, rice pudding, and pears poached in 
red wine. As he presented a bill ($38 for each of us), Lou- 
is Moissonnier described the rocky financial times he 
weathered during the heyday of nouvelle cuisine ten years 
ago. Now his bustling house is filled with thankful eaters 
and smells from his ancestral cooking fire. 

At Chez Philippe (also known as Auberge Pyr6n6es 
Cevennes, 106, rue de la Folic- Mericourt, 7501 1 Paris; 
43 57 33 78), la cuisine bourgeoise speaks with a south- 
west accent — a pot of foie gras for four, confit of quail, 
piperade Basquaise, Bayonne ham, and cassoulet in the 
style of Toulouse — though there are also ample choices 
of fish and roasted meats. You can start with a perfect 
crock of Bismarck herring, plump iced oysters with mi- 
gnonette sauce, or the cochonailles depays — seven hard 
salamis, a wooden cutting board, a sharp knife, a pot of 
creamy pat6, ajar of potent comichons, and a basket of 
breads. For me, the gates of heaven were opened by the 
house special confit d'oie, a huge gorgeous golden crispy 
dense joint of preserved goose, barely sharing the plate 
with handfuls of garlicky cepes and chunks of roasted po- 
tatoes. Philippe's version of confit d'oie is worth ►312 



310 



VOGUE APRIL 1990 





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FOOD 



rants), three tiny gratin dishes appeared 
before each place: a thimbleful of herbed 
tomato mousse, another of celery in pale 
green mustard sauce, and a quail's egg in 
a moat of shellfish cream, chives, and 
salmon caviar. Groult is a master at com- 
bining natural tastes in unusual ways. 

We both chose the 380 franc ($62) 
menu degustation (the special lunch 
menu costs 220 francs, a genuine bar- 
gain) and were brought soup bowls of 
rich langoustine cream with the bitter- 
sweet flavor of burnished shells, one of 
my favorite tastes; in it we ran across two 
artichoke hearts and two sweet, crisply 
sauteed langoustine tails. Next came the 
fish courses, rare slices of St. Pierre un- 
der a vinegary blanket of the tiniest zuc- 
chini and red pepper dice, and little 
rouget fillets flashing iridescent crimson, 
with slices of monkfish liver against a 
dark saffiron sauce. 

For our main course we toyed with the 
rack of hare and the cabbage stuffed with 
lamb's feet but chose at last Groult's play 
on canard a I' orange, a whole duckling 



carved lengthwise at the table into long, 
rare slices of gamy meat served with a tart 
little salad under a tangle of candied or- 
ange zest and whole roasted cqriander 
seeds. A poached pear in crisp caramel on 
a pool of blackberry sauce, a swirl of 
/raises des bois and whipped cream un- 
der a g\x\\t\ts,% feuillete heart, and a plate 
of tiny sweets finished us off. Did I forget 
to mention the eighty little dinner rolls 
they bake twice a day, moments before 
the customers arrive? 

Our check at Amphycles came to $80 a 
person, somewhere between the bill at a 
good bistro and the charge at an estab- 
lished temple of gastronomy. The smart 
money (mainly Patricia Wells and Robert 
Noah, who steered me to Amphycles) is 
divided on whether Groult will win two 
stars straightaway in the 1990 Michelin 
guide (published a week before you read 
these words) or whether Michelin's rules 
limit him to one in the restaurant's first 
year. But stardom seems assured. 

After dinner I introduced myself to 
Groult, who agreed to let me snoop 



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around his kitchen for a couple of days 
and collect some recipes for the readers 
back home. Our method was simple. 
First Groult fed me nearly half the 
menu. Then I picked six dishes for in- 
tensive study — his crisp spiced salmon 
steaks on a glossy, dark red- wine sauce 
made with salmon's blood; a "rizotto" 
with lobster (really a timbale of basmati 
rice); his lamb's feet in cabbage; the 
joues de boeuf, beef cheeks or jowls 
stewed for hours in red wine and vegeta- 
bles and served with a perfect round of 
honeyed carrots on a bed of baby onions 
and tiny lardons; the caramelized pear I 
had had for dinner; and an orange cream 
tart with a brittle sugar glaze. All were 
delicious and all seemed easy to make, 
at least while I was eating them. 

But a day in Groult's kitchen remind- 
ed me that haute cuisine, whether mod- 
ern or old-fashioned, is a highly 
professional enterprise. I stopped tak- 
ing notes on the rizotto at the tenth step, 
when I realized that before you begin 
cooking, you must have on hand a 
chicken veloute, a complex lobster 
cream, clarified chicken stock, and of 
all things, a few teaspoons of fresh pine- 
apple syrup — all for a flat, three-inch 
cylinder of rice and lobster. 

The joues de boeuf were, in fact, 
reasonably uncomplicated — until I re- 
turned to New York and tried to buy 
some. Butchers who treat me like a 
brother when I order squab and par- 
tridge lost my phone number. Even 
my friend Charlie Gagliardo, who 
manages the excellent meat depart- 
ment at Balducci's, resisted at first, 
claiming that all the beef cheeks in 
America are sent directly to Venezue- 
la, where they like that kind of thing. 
When I pressed Charlie for the address 
of the best butcher in Caracas, he re- 
lented and ten days later called to say 
that my sixty-pound box of sixty fresh 
cheeks — the wholesaler's minimum 
order — had arrived. When Charlie no- 
ticed that I was unable to lift sixty pounds 
off the floor, he agreed to sell me half the 
box and keep half for himself. I froze 
some and cooked the rest, and they were 
delicious and tender and intensely beefy. 
You probably won't want to turn over 
your entire freezer to a lifetime supply of 
cheek as 1 did. But if you'd like the reci- 
pe, just send me a card. • 



314 



VOGUE APRIL 1990 



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In the newest designs for 

interiors there's increasing evidence 

of a lively gold standard 

THE MIDAS TOUCH NO LONGER KILLS. IN THE NEWEST INTERIORS, GOLD IS NOT 
used for its historic associations, as ostentation, or to lend weight and sub- 

I stance to a room. Now it hghtly shimmers, played off vibrant colors, provid- 
ing sparkle and even wit. No longer automatically paired with Renaissance 
reds or dark brown woods, gold looks particularly fresh against saturated 

'< blues, pale lavenders, or intense greens. The precious metal has shed its pre- 
ciosity and is now treated as a lighthearted accessory: just a touch provides 
major impact. 
Representative of the new attitude are the hand-painted and hand- ^320 



LIVING 

Editor: Laurie Schechter 




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ABOVE, from 
Montgolfier, at 
Bergdorf 
Goodman, NYC. 
LEFT: Curtains and 
Italian chairs 
upholstered in silks 
hand-painted by 
Carolyn 
Quartermaine, 
London. 

317 






C IWOMOSIT 





The Beautiful 
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1. A rolled-steel mirror 

with golden touches by 

Cal Thompson, at 

Clodogh, the Center 

for American Design. 

2. In the office of 

Stephen Sills: golden 

objects including a 

model of the Taj 

Mahal, an antique 

mercury ball, tassels, and 

on 18th-century textile. 

3. A footed vase from 

Ronaldo Maia, hand-blown 

Venetian vases from the 

L. S. Collection, and gold 

vases from Gordon Foster; 

resin and brass candlesticks 

by Migeon et Migeon, at 

Barneys New York; metal 

chair by Linus Coraggio. 

The gold-leaf tea paper is 

by Anya Larkin, at Luten 

Clarey Stern. All NYC. 



printed fabrics Carolyn Quartemiaine create^ to be used on furni- 
ture or as a backdrop. Quartermaine paints touches of gold, in the 
shape of stars, feathers, and handwriting, against a palette of viv- 
id, clear colors to evoke an ethereal and vaguely nostalgic mood. 
A collaboration between the interior designers Paul Siskin and 
Perucho Vails and fabric artist Carla Weisberg has much the same 
spirit. By painting sheer organza covers, Weisberg transforms a 








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4. French chairs covered in a collage of silk and paper by Carolyn 
Quartermaine. 5. Animal Heaven silk fabric by Celia Birtwell, at 

) Christopher Hyland. 6. For Paul Siskin and Perucho Vails, Carlo 
Weisberg painted a table skirt, chair cover, and floor cloth of 
organza; the frame is painted on steel mesh by Gretchen 
~ Bellinger. Accessories from Siskin-Valls. All NYC. 



320 



VOGl'E APRIL 1990 




contemporary piece into a golden swagged Italian inlaid 
table; an ordinary chair becomes a Louis XVI chaise a la 
reine with glinting "damask" upholstery; and stainless- 
steel mesh fabric and a bit of gold fabric paint stand in for 
a French Empire mirror. The irreverent approach toward 
tradition and the obvious evidence of the hand in this 
work prove that here no one is taking gold too seriously. 

Recognizing that gold now works best as an accent, 
decorator Stephen Sills and his partner, James Huni- 
ford, collect unusual golden objects on their travels to 
be used in upcoming projects to bring a bit of burnished 
gleam to their subdued color schemes. Fashion design- 
er Norma Kamali, who has expanded into home fur- 
nishings, has recreated the golden "sheaf of wheat" 
chairs that Chanel had in her Paris apartment. Kamali 
has also designed a throw of matte gold sequins that 
adds subtle glamour to a room — and can even be worn 
for a gala evening. 

Other glints of gold appear in Montgolfier's plates of 
gold stars and moons against a deep blue, Maryse Box- 
er's ceramic dishes at Barneys New York, and Helene 
Rochas's scroll of gold on porcelain dinnerware. Celia 
Birtwell has updated tradition with her design of gold 
animals on deep colors of raw silk or silk organza. 
These provide decorative richness without pretension, 
evoking the splendor of exotic India or a bit of tongue- 
in-cheek grandeur. And Clarence House, noted for tra- 
ditional fabrics, is experiencing a surge of popularity 
for its gold-tinged fabric Brocade Arable. 

In the hands of a new generation of design talent, 
gold continues to shed its dowdy image and emerges 
shining. Decorating Editor: AMICIA DE MOUBRAY 



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POINT OF VIEW 

a real change 

At the end of the eighties, designers talked about a new era of femininity — in which the 
short, ladylike dress would replace the power suit, light fluttery fabrics such as chiffon would 
substitute for stiff wool. After seeing the Paris couture shows, the first of the decade, it's clear 
that designers are really committed to pulling off this change. There are evening dresses 
exploding with ostrich feathers and tulle, pom-poms decorate floor-sweeping trains, and red 
Gigi-style hats match curvy asymmetric suits. It's a total look — from makeup (more of it, in 
all shades of pink) and hair (carefully styled and groomed) to new shoes (with gracefully 
curved Louis heels). . . .Not surprisingly, dresses are everywhere — at the couture they 
looked prettier than the suits, and at the ready-to-wear they brought the biggest applause. In- 
herently feminine, they are decorated with a few well-placed bows, ruffles, and flowers (but 
never so many that they look saccharine sweet). Femininity aside, dresses are the simplest 
solution to dressing. "You put tights on, zip up the dress, and you're done, " says Bill Blass, 
who at press date, a month before fall collections, wasn't planning to create a single pair of 
pants. . . .Part of the new prettiness: clothes transformed by lingerie details. On our 
pages, we show the dressier versions — jumpsuits and floor-length gowns for evening — on 
actress Julia Roberts .... The crossover between sportswear and fashion continues, but 
with a new twist: top designers are giving real exercise clothes — swimsuits — the fashionable 
treatment, rather than simply incorporating the fabric or the look of gear into runway clothes 
that never see a swimming pool. Bathing suits are crafted with the same cutting-edge signa- 
ture details and attention to quality as ready-to- v/ear: Chanel, for instance, shirrs the tops of 
bathing suits and decorates them with camellias. These maillots are unexpectedly versatile — 
working as tops for evening skirts, as foundations for daytime suits .... More of fashion's in- 
fatuation with fitness: the sleek, body-skimming jumpsuit — derived from the unitard — 
takes on a softer, glamorous look when it's covered in silver sequins, patterned in "snake- 
skin." . . . And shorts are coming in chic new versions that are a far cry from sixties hot pants. 
In highly refined colors, patterns, and shapes, they function as the substitute for the short skirt 
in the city suit . . . .As fashion gets fit, one ofthe focuses becomes the midriff. Chloe whips up 
paillette dresses with sheer midsections, Yves Saint Laurent cuts long nighttime gowns in half, 
turning the tops into bandeaux, the bottoms into hip-hugging skirts. 



VOGUE APRIL 1990 



325 



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ignature this season: the collections are 
\lorious color, curvy shapes, and rich details 

Witness to inspiration! Paris sends its collective 

definition of the "feminine look" down the couture 

runways, and it is pure pleasure. There are suit jackets 

with curved decoUetage — instead of carved shoulders. 

There are dresses and skirts galore — not one pair of 

pants from the likes of Karl Lagerfeld. The single item 

borrowed from menswear — the trench coat — is redone 

in silk, with bows, ties that become sashes, sleeves that 

grow into dramatic shapes. Fabrics are fluid, draped, 

lacy, see-through. The palette for all this glory is ruled 

by soft shades from fresh peach to nude, plus clean 

reds and hints of iridescence. Even when black is used, 

it's never plain-Jane; it's a black-on-black decorative 

scheme of feathers, tulle, embroidery, and sequins. 

Take it as a sign of the times that Paris saw fit to bring 

back two very ladylike looks: the broad-brimmed straw 

hat and the evening dress that trails a train. 



CHANEL 

Taking off this spring: the shapely new suit. At Chanel, Karl Lagerfeld creates an exercise in asymmetry. 

The longer-length jacket buttons over a slice of a skirt that's cut with an uneven hem. More curves: the new Chanel 

pump with a Louis heel. The hat's pure Gigi, trailing a dotted scarf. The soft dark eyes are accented 

with Chanel's Quadra Eye Shadow in Tumultes. Details, last pages. 

329 



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[Schiffer (the 
^rsatile Guess? 
Chanel model) 
[and Christy 
Turlington 
^change post- 
, collection 
Iratulations. On 
pffer. a ribbon- 
ipped Empire 
dress. On 
Ington: a short 
I coat worn as a 
ress. All by 
>nel. OPPOSITE 
Showing off 
ler Chanel — a 
)n dress with a 
-the-waist 
line in front, a 
)in in back. 
Turlington 
uprlhe head tailor, 
Paquito Sala, who 

has worked at 
Chanel since 1983. 
Details, last pages. 

'v. 



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YSL 

Strolling arm-m- 
arm through the 
Hotel de Crillon. 

OPPOSITE PAGf 



Turlington and 

Paloma Picasso, a 

long-time couture 

follower. Turlington 

is m a coat that 

was something of a 

theme in the 

collections— the 

trench in a 

luxurious fabric 

This ones in 

iridescent silk, by 

Yves Saint Laurent. 

Hat. Yves Saint 

Laurent. 




LACROIX ^. 

A face-powder pink '^:. 
version of the ~' 
trench, this page. 



sashed at the 

waist, bowed at t' 

wrists, and mac 

up in silk by 

Christian Lacroix. 

Details, last paget 



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scene at the couture 



V 



:msttan Lao 



jalcmce hetuh 




ture with his new cat suit 




scene ot rne courure 




WSL 

Jin Yves Saint 
L^rent mqse and 
latent runw^star. 
jcie 
de La Falajse 
wearing his puff- 
sleeved dress with 
/ .a dramatic 
decoiletege (a YSL 

sign^ure this 
season):- Turlington 
is in a cfassic floor- 
length sequined 

Saint Laurent 
halter. The group 

portrait also 

includes Daniel de 

La Falaise, Lucie's 

brother. The rich lip 

color for night: on 

Luc^— Intense 

Lipstick 43 in 

Sandalwood Pink by 

Yves Saint Laurent. 

Makeup on 

Ti^rlington and on 

the next eleven 

pages, Francois Nars. 



CHANEL 

A sweetheart-style 

silk dress, this 

PAGE, is quilted and 

embellished with 

pearls. By Chanel. 

Photographed at 

the Hotel de 

Crillon. DetaMs, 

last pages. 




scene at the couture 



The beauty look for feminme evening clotU 




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mir that \s neater, makeup that 's pronounced 





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YSL 

Begging for all the 
attention here 
Paloma Picasso's 
pooch. Martha. 

Sharing the 
tabletop at the 
restaurant Dave: 
Turlington in a low- 
cut, long-stemmed 
dress from Yves 
Saint Laurent, 
perfectly plain 
except for a high- 
powered bow in the 
back, and 
mismatched 
gloves. Her short 

hair IS neatly 

slicked back with 

Paul Mitchell Super 

Clean Sculpting 

Gel. Details. 

last pages< 




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scene at the couture 



LACROIX 

Photographed in 
midflight at the 
Hotel de Crillon, 

THIS PAGE: Christian 

Lacroix's witty. 

feather-skirted 

tutu— a salute to 

ballerina Sylvie 

Guillem. He's 

asked her to be 

"godmother" at the 

launches for his 

new fragrance. 

Cast la vie! 



VERSACE 

More evidence of 

this season's fancy 

for feathers, 

OPPOSITE PAGE: A 

dress with a tiered 

ostrich skirt by 

Atelier Versace. 

Note the feminine 

accessory — a net 

"scarf" worn tucked 

into the shaped 

bodice. Completing 

the glamorous 

look: eyes and 

brows colored with 

Powder Pencil for 

Lids & Brows in 

Redwood, lips 

tinted with Winter 

Tan Super Lustrous 

Lipstick. Both by 

Revlon. Details. 

last pages. 







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»cene at the couture 



UNGARO 

A big-event exit at the 

Hotel de Crillon. 

Turlington is out the 

revolving door in 

Ungaro's slip of a 

dress, collared with 

tulle, and embroidered 

in gray and pink. 

Details, last pages. 



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sceii^at tli| cout^p 








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UNGARO 

After the collections. 
Turlington tries on an 
Ungaro with help from 
one of his head fitters 

and her assistant. 

The designer looks on. 

In sugar pink silk, the 

dress boasts Ungaro's 

master hand: a very 

feminine draped 

silhouette — and it's 

made up in one of the 

soft pastel colors seen 

all over Paris this 

season. Another 

Ungaro signature — 

Diva by Parfums 

Ungaro. Details. 

last pages. 






The scenario. 

OPPOSITE PAGE A 



chambermaid at 
the Hotel de Crillon 

gives a hallway 
critique of an Yves 

Saint Laurent 
creation. The dress 
is cut above the 
knee m front: in 
back, there s a 
trailing train — a 
melange of white 
satin organza and 
black gazar. plus 

an overlay of 
sequins, this page 



A brief tour de 
force, also from 
Saint Laurent — 
a dress patterned 
..•^•1 over in sequins— 
an homage to 
the Parisian dancer 
•Zizi 
ee Jeanmaire) 
Details, last pages. 




couture 



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treless, driven, the undisputed 
^queen of world tennis, Steffi Grc 
:hedding her mean-machine image 
to have some fun. Ed Kiersh reports 



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lave coi 
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i-cg-uaiiiig aiiuiis 

drew applause on 

runways from Paris 

to New York. 1. By 

Claude Montana — 

in an offbeat 

shade. Jacket, 

about $1,269; 

shorts, about 

$444. 2. A suede 

jacket and cotton 

faille shorts by 

Hermes. Shorts. 

about $595. 

3. Highly refined — 

by Chanel. 4. The 

small fitted jacket 

and fluid shorts by 

Karl Lagerfeld. 

Jacket, about 

$1,115: shorts, 

about $890. 
5. Revealing the 
midriff — Azzedine 
Alaia's bandeau 
and shorts. Shorts, 
about $405. 
6. Moschino 
Couture's tongue- 
in-cheek take on 
Chanel. Bustier 
(about $385). an 
I shorts (about $345 
7. The long and th; 
short of it — by 
Krizia. Jacket 
(about $1,090^ 
shorts (ab 
$510). 8 _,.. 
summer wl|l(^s by 
Michael KorsKJ^oat. / 
about $370: srt^. 
about $i5d. Y 
9. Recognt2ably| 
Hermes — br 
(about $27E 
(about $1,2? 
and shorts (abo| 
$795). Details,'' 
stores, last pages! 




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As refined as 
couture dresses: 
Chanel's black- 
and-white shirred 
swimsuits. Two- 
piece, about $295. 
Chanel Boutique, 
NYC, Palm Beach 
FL; Saks Jandel. 
One-piece, about 
$305. Chanel 
Boutique, WC, 
Washington DC. 
Chicago. In this 
story: hair. Sam 
McKnight for Daniel 
Galvin at La Coup? 

makeup. Mary 
Greenwell D^ 
more stoc 
last page 



Fashion Editor: 
Cariyne Cerf de 

Dtidzeele « 
Photographer: 

Patrick 
Demarchelier 



k 




^ ^ /. 






FENDI 

Designed with all 

the news of the 

season, opposite 

PAGE High-contrast 

geometries by 
Fendi. About $195. 
Fendi. NYC. 
Protecting lips- 
Elizabeth Arden's 

Lip Sheer in 

Gentleberry with 

built-in sunscreen. 



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HERMES 

One of the famous 

Parisian Hermes 

patterns, this page. 

on a maillot (vyorn 

backwards here) 

and leggings 

(which, for the 
adventuresome, 

can go in the 'jj 
water). Suit (about 
$215) and leggings 

(about $450). 
Hermes Boutique. 

NYC. Chicago. 

Beverly Hills. 

Details, more 
stores, last pages. 






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fitness Stfoshio 




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KAMALI 

The graphic 
approach, opposite 



Norma Kamali s 
athletic look— "'he 
video suit ■ — With 
cutout ■screens." 
About $72. OMO 

Norma Kamali. 
NYC Robe. Ralph 

Lauren At Home 

Wear The easiest 

sunscreen to 

apply—a spray 

formula. Here. 

Biotherm s Triple 

Protection Oil-Free 

Sun Spray with 
SPF 10. 

FERRE 

Time was when a 
matching top and 

jacket this 

sophisticated were 

seen only at La 

Grenouille. this 



PAGE Gianfranco 



Ferre's maillot and 

silk blazer (thrown 

over one shoulder). 

Maillot about 

$214. Romanoff 

Boutique. Bal 

Harbour, Coconut 

Grove FL Rolex 

watch Details. 

more stores. 

last pages. 



'-'—TV.'-^Tf^' ■> •■-f^KV' 



\ 







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second skin 

Designers are taking exercise-inspired pieces to new, glamorous 
heights-decorating them with sequins and snake patterns 



368 



Two reveal ng 
looks: a top s 
decorated with 
paillettes; a body- 
, hugging unitard. 

OPPOSITE PAGE: 



Jean Paul 
^ Gaultier's 
transparent "T- 

■ ■ " about 



Dresner, 

Birmingham Ml. 
With this much 
nude color, what 
looks best: smoky 
'es. Here. Shadow 
Milano Trio in 
inima by Princess 
arcella Borghese 



in cotton a 

by Claude 

Montana. About 

$312. If. SoHo 

NYC: Caron Cherry. 

Coconut Grove: 

Claude Montana 

Boutique. Beverly 

Hills. N. Peal 

Cashmere 

cardigan. In this 

story: hair. Julien 

d'Is. Paris: makeu| 

Stephana Marai: 

for lAgence Bruno. 

Paris. Details, more 

stores, last pages 



Fashion Editor: 

Grace Coddington 

Photographer: 

Peter Lindbergh 



fitness & fashion 



Science fiction has 
long predicted that 
the jumpsuit will be 
the uniform for the 

21st century. 

Today, it's the 
young replacement 

for the short 
evening dress, this 

PAGE: Katharine 
Hamnett's futuristic 

vision. Bagutta, 
NYC. Paul Smith 

robe. Natural 

foundation that 

plays down the 
high shine of silver: 

Meadow Beige 
Fresh Air Makeup 
by Estee Lauder. 

OPPOSITE PAGE: 

High fashion seems 
to be taking its cue 
from female comic- 
strip characters 
who play up the 
sexiness of 
bodysuits by 
wearing them with 
high heels. Here, 
Issey Miyake's 

nylon body 

stocking. About 

$515. Issey Miyake 

Boutique, NYC. 

Details, more 

stores, last pages. 










The most high-style "sportswear" to come off the 

runway: chic jumpsuits that resemble the body-conscious 

costumes of Wonder Woman and Batgirl 



371 




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378 


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»^s nothing like a 



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The recent recipient of a major honor 

from her queen. Dame Margaret Smith 

nonetheless remains, Georgina Ho^vell 

discovers, the feisty, funny Maggie 




aggie Smith, the red- 
headed English actress 
who will never be for- 
gotten as Miss Jean 
Brodie, is being photo- 
graphed by Snowdon 
for the New York opening of Lettice & Lavage. 
The piay, a comedy specially written for her by 
Peter Shaffer, was a major hit in London and is 
likely to repeat its success on Broadway. In no 
small part this is because Britain's most recent 
theatrical Dame gives what is a wonderfully 
roguish performance of high feminine camp. 

Cued by the staircase where Snowdon has 
placed her and invited her to make big gestures, 
she gives us the opening speech, playing an over- 
ly enthusiastic tour guide employed to talk visi- 
tors around a dullish Elizabethan house. 

"We come to the most remarkable feature of 
Fustian House," she declares with gusto, gentri- 
fying her voice and rolling her r's with relish. 

"This is the grand staircase constructed in 
1560 out of Tudor oak. The banister" — she lays 
a hand dramatically on eighteenth-century iron- 
work — "displays an ogival pattern typical of the 
period. Please note the escutcheons placed 
around the fireplace" — rococo flourish of the 
fingertips — "These bear the family motto, in 
Latin, 'Lapso surgo' " — very elaborately enun- 
ciated — "meaning 'By a fall' " — her hands 
dive — " 'I rise' " — they H utter upward. 



Freezing in the dotty pose, she sinks slowly 
back into the general laughter and asks in a very 
different mode, "Do I look absolutely pissed?" 

A strand of her hair is combed into a fuller 
curve, and someone holds a gilt bangle to her thin 
wrist. Editorial voices are raised in debate. 

"The hair and the bangle — too much?" 

"Too bright. We'll drench it with hair lacquer 
and dull it right down . ' ' 

A very slight look of inquiry flits over Maggie 
Smith's features, the merest suggestion of "Far 
be it from me . . . " As the bracelet is sprayed she 
murmurs very quietly to herself in a thin, curdled 
voice, "Oh! I thought you meant my hair," add- 
ing internally, through her nose, "How very 
foolish of me." 

Comedy is her natural element, but she has 
played most of the classics magnificently and 
many definitively, taking over key roles such as 
HeddaGabler, Cleopatra, and Mrs. Sullen in The 
Beaux' Stratagem and making them her own. 
She joined the Old Vic company in 1959, and 
four years later Laurence Olivier invited her to 
play Desdemona to his Othello at the National. 
She has been appreciated in the United States 
since 1956, when she made her professional de- 
but in New York in a revue fresh from the Oxford 
Playhouse and the Edinburgh Festival. After the 
breakup of her marriage to actor Robert Ste- 
phens, she spent the late 1 970s polishing the clas- 
sic roles at Stratford, Ontario, and she has won 



Photographer: Snowdon 



wm 



The many faces off 
Maggie: clockwise 

FROM LEFT, WJth 

Michael Paiin in A 
Private Function, 
1984; with Sir 
Laurence Olivier in 
Othello, 1965; with 
Helena Bonham- 
Carter in A Room 
with a View, 1985; 
TTie Prime of Miss 
Jean Brodie, 1969; 
and TYie Lonely 
Passion of Judith 
Heame, 1987. 



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Oscars for The Prime of Miss Jean 
Brodie and California Suite. 

Interviewers remember the time she 
outlined her remarkable career from 
tea girl to Dame in a dozen words: 
"One wanted to act, one started to act, 
and one's still acting." The same age 
as Brigitte Bardot, she remains true to 
her strong natural bias against preten- 
tiousness. Theorizing bores her. She is 
known for plunging into roles without 
apparent analysis, delivering the char- 
acter complete in an instant, as a good 
mimic will do. 

Director and friend Patrick Garland 
once told her that he had never quite 
understood Millamant in Congreve's 
The Way of the World, the role for 
which she had just won her fourth Eve- 
ning Standard Best Actress Award in 
the Hay market. 

"Oh, don't talk to me about under- 
standing it, dear," said Maggie Smith, 
quickly. "I've played it for three years 
now, and I still don't understand it." 
She does not choose to 
show effort, which does 
not mean there is none to 
show. Her forte is high 
comedy played with the 
lightest touch. Through a 
magical technique she can 
combine comedy and pa- 
thos, taking you from 
laughter to tears in a single 
sentence. "She can do it 
on one note," says play- 
wright Alan Bennett, 
' 'and in the shortest 
time." No role, however 
"ordinary," fails to move 
you. Recently there have 
been the small-town social climber in Bennett's film A Pri- 
vate Function — "My father had a chain of dry cleaners. We 
regularly used to drink wine with the meal" — and a vicar's 
tipsy, satirical wife in his highly acclaimed series of mono- 
logues for British television. In James Ivory's film of A Room 
with a View, she played spiky Charlotte Bartlett, perpetually 
insisting on being "no trouble to anyone," excruciatingly ir- 
ritating but finally touching. 

Alan Bennett says that she hardly needs to rehearse. 
"She's a very intelligent actress, very clever, very percep- 
tive, and she just gets on with it. When I've worked with her 
there's been nothing to do. If you give her a note, she already 
knows what you are going to say. 

"She tells a story about Noel Coward when she was in Pri- 

Theorizing bores her. Itn 
analysis, delivering in 



there% nothing like a dame 



vate Lives. She was doing too much as Amanda. He just put 
his head round'the door and said, 'Naughty!' She knew exact- 
ly what he meant." 

"The more one has done something, the more difficuh it 
gets," she says. "I believe it's true of designing, writing, 
perhaps everything. You start off with supreme confidence. 
It doesn't cross your mind that it's going to be difficult. Then 
it becomes clear to you as you go on that it is a very complex 
thing to do. And your confidence goes, just when it ought to 
be a breeze." 

She's sitting on a sofa in the first-floor drawing room of the 
Chelsea house where she lives with her husband, Beverley 
Cross, an award-winning playwright and screenwriter, the 
bearded author of Boeing-Boeing and Haifa Sixpence. She is 
elegantly thin in a black cotton jacket and tight black pants. 
Her hair and her wary bright blue eyes are the only color in the 
pale, cool room. 

The "Dame Margaret" is only a few weeks old and still 
gives her pause. A variety of reactions, mostly humorous, flit 
across her fine features as she is congratulated on this, on her 
CBE, her two Hon. D.Litt. 's, her two Oscars, and her numer- 
ous other awards. 

"When Donald Wolfit was knighted," she says, "a friend 
wrote to ask if he could still call him Donald. He wrote back, 
'Ofcourseyoucan. But Ican't answer for Lady Wolfit.' 

"When I got the letter, Bev insisted on doing a lot of bow- 
ing and scraping. So now we call him Lady Wolfit." 

She hasn't worked for a year as a result of overlapping ill- 
nesses, and looks forward again to Broadway, to the continu- 
ing Lettice & Lovage partnership with Margaret Tyzack, to 
fresh improvements and changes. On holiday on Mosquito in 
the British Virgin Islands, she broke an arm while cycling to 
wave goodbye to the boat carrying a guest. Lady Olivier: it 
took seven hours to get her to the nearest hospital . Then a thy- 
roid condition affecting her eyes further delayed the New 
York opening. Discovering that Barbara Bush suffers from 
the same complaint, she recently wrote a letter of sympathy. 
"What did I say? I said I've had so many operations I feel like 
an antimacassar." 

She spent the enforced rest period at her fifteenth-century 
Sussex house, all beams and windows, with her husband and 
the two grown sons from her first marriage. 

"But I feel more like a person when I'm working. Most of 
living is sort of hanging around and not knowing what you are 
doing. The day starts with what are you going to wear, and 
one question follows another. When you're in a play that's all 
decided. Suddenly your life is organized and defined." 

Anxiety plays a large part in her humor. There is the story 
about the BBC audition she failed after setting the studio on fire. 
About the London run oi Lettice & Lovage, she chiefly remem- 
bers Guy Fawkes night, November 5, 1988, punctuated by so 
many bangs and crashes that it recalled the Blitz. 

"In the second act a woman had a kind of mad fit in the 
stalls. Finally they got her out and tried to put her in an ambu- 
lance. And she escaped and ran off up Shaftesbury Avenue, 
leaving them holding a mink coat. Then in the third act, all the 




lights went out and there was a longish pause. And when the 
lights went up I said, 'Where shall we go from?' and a man in 
a box said, 'Go from the beginning. ' 

"Two friends of mine came round afterwards. One was 
quite vivacious about it all, but the other was quite silent. And 
his friend finally said, 'I'm sorry about him. He's not speak- 
ing very much. He forgot to put his teeth in and we were late 
and I wouldn't let him go back to collect them.' It sort of 
rounded off the most terrifying evening. ' ' 

Thin-skinned and impatient, she's quick on the draw, her 
trigger finger at the ready. She has the lightest touch, but she 
shoots to kill. "A lot of the alternative comedians are wool- 
ly," said one of her friends. "They blast away wildly, hitting 
one target in twenty. Well, Maggie has unerring aim." It's 
not always what she says that contains the sting, but the tone 
of her voice. A companion once said, ' ' If things go wrong she 
can lash out and be quite frightening and cruel." 

hen I asked Patrick Garland 
about Maggie Smith's qualities 
as a person and an actress, he an- 
swered in a parody of the literary 
critic Lord David Cecil's fa- 
mous words on Jane Austen: 
"I'm not absolutely sure she is my favorite twentieth-century 
actress. But she is the woman whose disapproval I would 
least like to incur." 

The speed of her comebacks usually serves to entertain. 
Recently friends drew her to the door of the men-only bar of 
tl.e well-known London theater club. The Garrick, to show 
her a new painting of Sir Laurence Olivier. She hovered, then 
drifted in to see portraits of such other familiars as Denholm 
Elliott, Sir Alec Guinness, and Noel Coward, at which point a 
tweeny in frilled cap and apron asked her to leave. 

"And you?" responded Dame Margaret icily. "Are we to 
take it you're a chap in drag?' ' 

Her most grueling part, she says, was Virginia Woolf in 
Edna O'Brien's play. During the run, one of her twin brothers 
died. It is a close family, and the Crosses had shared with him 
and his wife a Lutyens house surrounded by a Gertrude Jekyll 
garden. 

"Virginia became an incredibly difficult thing to do. It 
wasn't a case of escaping into a part for an hour or two, be- 
cause it really happened. She had a tragic life and suffered 
great losses. 1 became desperately glum . . . but that way mad- 
ness lies." 

Things have to be right at home for her to do her best work: 
"I find it enormously comforting to have Bev. who really 
makes it possible for me to function." Her only bad reviews, 
ever, were for Private Lives, at a time when she was playing 
opposite her first husband and their marriage was disintegrat- 
ing. Her dislike of being interviewed may date from the un- 
welcome press scrutiny of this period. 

She has not yet appeared on a TV talk show, discussed her 
marriage, or allowed her houses to be photographed. The re- 
markable thing is that a woman so fastidious, reticent. ^421 



r. cnown for plunging into roles without apparent 
igiracter in an instant, as a good mimic will do 



J^ 



' '«\l«- 



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In Julian Schnabel's 
West Village live-in 
studio, his children, 

Stella, Vito, and 
Lola, are dwarfed b)L ' 
a pair of brooding , 
canvases but remain 
unperturbed. 



Editor: 

Anne McNally 

Photographer: 

Brigitte Lacombe 



I fa^M/r K^a 



vi-t h«a r t 



Their fathers are 
famed artists; 
their playrooms 
resemble galleries. 
Rachel Urquhart 
discovers 
a very special 
art v^orld 



Something happens when you put a 
young child in a room full of art. The 
same work that has some adults whis- 
pering reverently as if they were in the 
presence of something holy — and oth- 
ers snickering about the prices people 
will pay, and for what — calls forth an 
entirely different reaction from chil- 
dren. Sculptures are there to be 
touched, canvases to hide behind. Art 
becomes a plaything, not an object to be 
mounted, framed, or placed on a pedes- 
tal with the spotlight just so. 

This seems especially true inside 
artists' homes or studios, where art, 
often in varying stages of completion, 
is everywhere. Their children make 
the art of art appreciation seem new, 
occasionally messy, definitely a 
hands-on operation. 

There is little evidence of Julian 
Schnabel's three children — Lola, 
eight, Stella, seven, and Vito, three — 
in his cavernous, raw West Village stu- 
dio. Huge, dark, and vaguely frighten- 
ing, his Brobdingnagian canvases 
sprawl inside ornate gilt frames, 
stacked against the two-story cement 
walls. A column of stereo equipment 
pumps Lou Reed through the air, while 
a cold wind from the river whistles in 
gusts over the gray skylight like an an- 
gry muse. The only possible hints that 
someone besides a large and moody 

383 



toying with art 




% 




painter lives here are two antique toy 
pedal cars — and even they are valuable 
collectibles. 

But then the freight elevator doors 
open and out trot Schnabel's two coltish 
daughters, Lola and Stella, insouciantly 
brightening the gloom. Their presence 
has the paradoxical effect of making ev- 
erything seem more monstrous and less 
menacing, a child's paradise — a giant, 
messy, indoor playground. 

The girls' bedroom — a warm lair on 
the first level of the duplex studio — is a 
funny mix of the Gothic and the child- 
ish, a sort of V/uthering Heights- 
meels-Romper Room. Maroon-striped 
wallpaper, dark green velvet drapes, 
and antique iro • beds are counterpoint- 
ed by teddy bears, jigsaw puzzles, and 
board games like Candyland. 

Upstairs, where the kitchen, Schna- 
bel's bedroom, and the living room 
form a sort of dark balcony that over- 
looks the studio, the girls pose with Vito 

384 



on the frayed arm of a crimson sofa. 
Though drawing-room portraits do not 
appear to be on Schnabel's immediate 
agenda, he poses and directs his chil- 
dren as if working on one of his own 
canvases. He is firm and gentle and not 
without humor, but he leaves little to 
chance, or other people's discretion. 

Later, downstairs in the studio, the 
three children pick their way carefully 
through the works in progress as if they 
were stepping on lily pads to cross a 
goldfish pond. At the combined age of 
eighteen, they already have an appreci- 
ation most adults will never know. 

There is a sense of warmth and calm 
in Brice and Helen Marden's house, 
one that is mirrored in their youngest 
daughter. Melia, nine. A fire crackles 
in the living room fireplace, and most of 
the objects in the room glow with the 
patina of age and the richness of far- 
away places. A marble vessel, carved 
like a lotus flower and filled with water. 



sits on the floor near the fire; a head- 
piece from Cameroon, decorated with 
wildebeest hair and a monkey skull, 
rests on a nearby table; a quirky blue 
desk, carved as intricately as an Islamic 
mosque, is set against a white wall. 

Melia, who likes words and wants to 
be a writer, reads a book of stories in the 
adjacent sitting room. The sunny room 
has a similarly exotic feel, with its soft 
saffron-and-red fabrics and collection 
of objects from India and Africa. 

"My parents are always getting all 
these sculptures — most of them are 
really boring — but I like the one over 
the sofa in here," says Melia, pointing 
to a wooden mask shaped a bit like a 
cow's head. "It just seems so. . .so nice. 
Also, ' ' she adds with a smile and a faint 
don't-ask-me-how-I-could-have-been- 
so-silly eye roll, "when I was little, like 
three, my sister brought home this 
friend and we took pencils and we put 
them in its mouth to see if it ate pencils. 



They already have an appreciation for art 
most adults will never know 



\ 



I Marden, 

OPPOSITE, in a 

reflective mood 

beside one of her 

father's canvases, this 

PAGE: In her father's 

studio, Olympic 

Sonnier heads off 

to explore. 



r 



i.ont of a massiv* 
rank Stalla canvas. 
I'asminc and Philipp* 

Arman ploy 
trampoline. QH»osni: 

Philippe finds a 

Warhol Brillo box the 

peHect perch while 

listening to his Keith 

Horing radio. 




J J 






1i 



\-,f^ 




A^ 






Warh5lArillo boxes seem tailor-made for play 
at l^&'while parents are out of the room 



oying with art 




I 




I thought it ate pencils." 

Keith Sonnier and his assistants have 
just finished lowering the swing that 
hangs from the ceiling of his studio. At 
a height of about one foot off the 
ground, it is just low enough for Son- 
nier's daughter, Olympia, two years 
old. After managing to clamber onto the 
slippery polished-wood seat, she slides 
off into a pile of giggles on the floor. 
The spacious Tribeca studio seems 
large enough for the tall artist and his 
work, yet it can hardly contain his little 
daughter, who runs from end to end like 
a three-foot quarterback in a jam. 

When not tearing back and forth, 
Olympia seems chiefly interested in 
sitting on the Indian-quilted bed and 
looking at her books. Not even the 
bright colors and constant flashing of 
Sonnier' > neon sculptures distract 
her. ' 'If she wants to draw when she's 
older, she will," says her mother, 



Nessia Pope. "But we would never 
push her to do that." 

It is difficult to imagine a potentially 
more disastrous place for a child to play 
than the living room of Arman and his 
wife, Corice. There are beautiful leath- 
er sofas to stain, countless fragile pieces 
of African art to break, valuable 
artworks — by Arman and others — to 
knock around and otherwise treat in an 
unorthodox manner. While a magical 
place for make-believe — after all, there 
are few things more enticing to the un- 
der-ten set than making child's play of 
expensive adult toys — one does not 
imagine a raucous game of hide-and- 
seek ending happily here. At least not as 
far as the grown-ups are concerned. 

Enter Yasmine, seven, and Philippe, 
three, with a trunkload of dolls, board 
games, marbles, and of course, candy 
(supplied, it must be admitted, by 
Vogue as a sugary bribe to play nicely in 

387 



teying with art 



>'^^. 




front of the camera). Within minutes, 
one comer of the beautiful room has 
been transformed. There are colored 
marbles flying through the air, cat food 
and melted chocolates being ground 
into an exquisite Arman carpet, and 
shrieks of pleasure as the two children 
take turns bounding off the sofa in front 
of a large Frank Stella canvas. Two 
Andy Warhol Brillo boxes seem tailor- 
made for Yasmine and Philippe to play 
on — when their mother is out of the 
room. Not even the beautiful velvety 
cushions from one of Arman's musical- 
instrument-case armchairs escape be- 
coming momentary playthings, though 
it isn't long before they too are cast 
aside — for a Keith Haring radio. 

Downstairs, in he children's wing, 
Yasmine's and Philippe's rooms are 
crammed with toys. The painting that 
hangs over Yasmine's bed — a large, 
colorful canvas covered with wooden 
paintbrushes — is by her father. In a 

588 



|i»jg 



^Sb^ 



bookcase in the hallway, her admiration 
for her father's work is reflected. 
There, in a pile, are some of Yasmine's 
own artworks — a few of which feature 
small plastic paintbrushes glued onto a 
piece of cardboard. 

Zena, six, and Malia, two, live in a 
cartoon house. The telephone — en- 
hanced by their father, Kenny Scharf — 
looks like a neon-painted spaceship. A 
tall canvas of a brightly colored mutant 
daisy decorates the stairwell, while the 
Jetsons take off from a painting on the 
second-floor landing. Even the Scharfs' 
dog. Honey — who may be the only dog 
in the world to resemble her owner's 
work instead of her owner — has the 
doe-eyed, long-eared, short-legged 
look of a comic strip canine. 

The girls' room is a child's dream of a 
room. Scharfhas covered Zena's wood- 
frame bunk bed almost completely with 
planets, fish, snails, birds, and dogs, 
and carved the wooden bars of Malia 's 



crib into a brightly painted zoo of ani- 
mal shapes— an elephant, an octopus, a 
frog. The rest of the room, with its toy 
green velvet curtains framing the win- 
dows as if they were puppet-show the- 
aters, is full of child-size furniture, 
books, toys, and cartoons, all drawn 
specially for the girls by their father. 

In their parents' room, where Zena 
and Malia have temporarily turned the 
white-lace-covered bed into a trampo- 
line, the feeling is still playful. The bed 
is framed with wrought-iron curlicues, 
while a heavy metal chair rests on thick 
springs. Both are Scharfs creations. 
The artist has even placed his mark on 
the previous tenant's old wallpaper. In 
the bedroom, he has torn down alternat- 
ing strips of the light gray paper to re- 
veal stripes of warm yellow glue 
beneath. And from the otherwise unre- 
markable wallpaper in the hall, Scharf 
has cut out strange starlike shapes that 
resemble nothing so much as the ► 420 



Few things are m 
child's play o 



ticing than making 



\^ivc adult toys 



/ 



In their parents' 
'^jbedroom, Zena and 



ore surrounded by 

creations by their 

father and his friend 

Keith Haring. this pa( 

Twins Pietro and 

Andrea Clemente are 

engrossed beneath a 

still life by their father. 



i^KfV^' 



* V 



Denn 

fictional debut! 
commi 
unexpect( 




' hen the nursery h 
been prepared f 
the never-born bal 
the marriage has reached its ii 
passe, and the novel's protog 
nist gets the news of his brothei 
suicide— all in the first thr€ 
paragraphs — you may wond 
what the good news is. Read or 
In the freshly painted interi 
of a house just outside Bost 
Dennis McFarland's five-ye 
old daughter is in party shoes a 
is in charge. "My father has th 
exact same book!" she excloir 
OS I show her my advance cop! 
Next she introduces her kittt 
and announces the arrival fro 
upstairs of her eight-week-o 
brother, who has a cold. 

The novel is dedicated wi 
love to McFarland's wife, N 
chelle Simons, a poet enrolled I 
the Harvard Divinity School. H 
pleasure is evident when the mi 
contains his renewed passpo 
since with their "newfour 
wealth" they have planned a fii 
winter vacation. There is also 
contract for the Italian public 
tion, and with the paperba 
rights floored and the scre^ 
rights under option to Columb 
there's plenty to celebrate. 

1 mean not only that the bool< 
good — it is superb — but th 
there is good news right in tL 
story of dead ends and unfulfill 
promises, of suicide and alcohi 
ism, of perpetual adolescen 
and premature death. The oi 
come, without any cheap tricks 
false notes (in this novel ab( 
music), is only hopeful. Den 
McFarland says, "One thing H 
learning about life is that thr" 
are very few things left that c 
black and white." The Mu: 
Room is a novel about real Ii 
and it demonstrates that practi 
makes, if not perfect, at leasi 
life well worth living. 

Read on. 

—ALEXANDRA MARSH/ 



CF Srisnci makes an extraordinary 
ill telling him his younger brother. Perry, has 
licide launches the narrator back on an 
larious trip into their family's terrible past 



^ n the bicentennial year of our country's indepen- 

9 dence from Great Britain, a time when I imagined 

the American masses celebrative and awash with a 

1 sense of history and continuity, my wife of only 
four years decided it would be best for both of us if 
she moved in with her mother for a while — a trial 
separation, she said, though we both were so im- 
mediately relieved by the idea of parting, the real 
thing was bound to endure . In October of the previ- 
ous year, she had suffered her second miscar- 
riage — this one quite far along (almost six months); we'd 
begun to breathe easy, we'd begun decorating a nursery — 
and afterward, we succumbed to a stubborn disappointment 
that refused forgiveness, refused sexual and emotional heal- 
ing. There had never been anything in our marriage quite as 
coherent as this two-headed tragedy. Madeline left for Santa 
Rosa in February, a rainy, blossoming-of-spring month in 
northern California. 

By the following August, I had decided to give up our large 
apartment in San Francisco, where I remained, a rambling 
monk with only random visitation rights to my past. The 
place, the apartment, was a daily encounter with guilt and 
failure, and though I knew enough not to believe in geograph- 
ical cures for those conditions, that didn't make me any less 
eager to escape its sinister Victorian charm. What Madeline 
didn't have any use for in Santa Rosa I put into storage. I ar- 
ranged for a leave from my record company, where things 
had long run better without me anyway. I thought I would 
travel for a few weeks, perhaps visit my brother in New York. 
I imagined that on my return I might find better, altogether 
different living quarters — a houseboat in Sausalito perhaps, a 
geodesic dome on Mount Tam. 

My landlady had told me I should leave the apartment 
"broom clean," a task for which I'd kept a vacuum cleaner. 
In the never-used nursery there were cobwebs, and on the 
walls and ceiling about a hundred self-adhesive stars and 
moons that glowed in the dark (better than any real starlit sky 
the night I brought my pregnant wife into the room and 
switched off the light to show her my handmade heaven). As I 
vacuumed away the cobwebs, I discovered that the little stars 
and moons had become dry over the months, and when I 
passed the vacuum across the surface of the wall, they let go 
easily. This was just the sort of thing I needed, the sort of 
thing I'd been needing for weeks. And as I stood there suck- 
ing the stars and moons from the nursery walls, and crying 
like a baby myself, the phone rang in the kitchen. It was a de- 
tective with the New York City police department" s homicide 
unit, informing me that early that morning my brc iher, Perry, 
had fallen to his death from the twenty-third floor of a mid- 
town hotel, apparently a suicide. 



Stupidly, I asked the man to hold the line for a moment. I 
returned to the nursery, then moved to the French windows 
that overlooked the garden. On the south fence, a humming- 
bird darted in and out of a passionflower vine, and at a distant 
window , across the length of two gardens, I could see a young 
nurse, in white uniform and cap; I waved to her, but quite sen- 
sibly she didn't wave back, and moved away out of sight. 
When I returned to the kitchen, I saw that the receiver of the 
cardinal red telephone lay on the bare floor. I picked it up and 
spoke into it. I relied on extreme politeness to get through the 
rest of the conversation. I told the detective how very sorry I 
was to have kept him waiting, and asked would he be kind 
enough to tell me his name again, his precinct, and yes, I 
would be coming to New York on the first flight, thanks very 
much for letting me know about my brother. 

For a moment after hanging up, I wondered why Perry 
hadn't thought of me. Not why hadn't he thought of me as 
someone to turn to, but why hadn't he chosen a better time to 
do himself in, a time when I didn't already have troubles 
enough. And as punishment for this moment of weakness, I 
then recalled that Perry had left a message on my answering 
machine a few weeks earlier — nothing special, just hello, 
like to talk to you — and I'd never got around to returning the 
call . At that point I had made the decision to give up the apart- 
ment, which was really a decision to overturn what I current- 
ly, loosely called my life, and Perry was not a soothing 
influence. I loved him, and I couldn't have named some of the 
deep and thorough ways in which I depended on him, but he 
was not a soothing influence. 

What immediately followed the New York detective's 
phone call were a lot of practical arrangements — securing a 
flight and a hotel reservation, disposing of the vacuum clean- 
er, leaving the key to the apartment with the landlady, dis- 
pensing with my car, turning off the telephone service, 
ordering transportation to the airport — and at some point dur- 
ing all this, maybe it was when I saw my two already packed 
suitcases standing near the entry hall door — I thought. Sensi- 
ble people don't allow themselves ever to become this un- 
moored, they don't allow themselves to reach so frayed a 
loose end. And why? Because it's very likely that fate will 
rush in with some great calamity to give new purpose to your 
life. And for a while, as I sat in the smoky, upholstered cabin 
of a 747, flying toward the details of my only brother's spat- 
tered remains on some grimy patch of pavement in New York 
City, I actually thought that perhaps I'd developed an inter- 
esting life view these last couple of hours. I drank two minia- 
tures of Dewar's scotch on an empty stomach, and pictured 
Fate in the style of an editorial drawing — not as the name for 
what befalls you in life, but as a grizzly beast with a thousand 
eyes, lurking behind a large rock or tree: the landscape is 

391 



Western, arid (I'm not sure why); you pass by on an ambling 
horse; Fate, in his hiding place, waits for you to let go, even 
momentarily, of the reins. It wasn't until we'd begun our de- 
scent into Kennedy that I understood what a crock all this 
thinking was, what a soft, mushy swamp I'd let my mind be- 
come lately — that primarily, at least, what had happened to- 
day had happened to Perry and not to me. 

My flight had left San Francisco at eight-thirty in the eve- 
ning, which put me into New York at the exotic hour of five in 
the morning. My cabdriver was a black woman in her forties, 
six feet tall, dressed in a khaki jumpsuit, her straightened hair 
dyed orange and trained into a severe flip on one side. In a 
professional gospel singer's voice, she sang a soulful "Bright 
Lights, Big City" on the way into town, and at first I thought 
she was putting me on, that the song was meant as counter- 
point to the heaviness of her foot on the accelerator and the 
casual, abandoned way in which she frequently changed 
lanes. But something in her singing, probably simply how 
amazingly good it was, told me that she was listening to 
herself, that I wasn't on her mind in the least. 

On the metal frame encasing the 
Plexiglas protective barrier between us, 
someone, a former fare perhaps, had 
scratched into the black enamel, "Boys 
are my whole life." I assumed that this 
had been written by a teenaged girl 
(though surely this was not necessarily 
the case), and I thought of Perry at fif- 
teen, a precocious fifteen but fifteen all the same, and me, 
nineteen and home from my sophomore year of college. 

It's a moonless summer night, one of the Spring Lake 
beaches on the Jersey Shore. Somebody whose parents are in 
Europe for the month of August is having a big house party, 
one of those parties where the host , whoever he is , has invited 
his friends and told his friends to invite their friends, and so 
on. The resulting mixture of booze and partial anonymity has 
fallen like a gauze over everything at this late hour; there's 
something decidedly permissive in the sound of the surf and 
the wind. I haven't seen Perry for a couple of hours, and 
Jeanine Clotfelter, my date for the party, has urged me a few 
times to go find him. I'm older and should be looking out for 
him. I tell Jeanine that she shouldn't be such a worrier, it's not 
good for her skin. 

As someone throws more driftwood onto a huge bonfire on 
the beach, twisted screens of sparks fly up, are caught by the 
wind, and die. Someone plays white, city-kid blues on a gui- 
tar. Couples stroll away and are swallowed up by the darkness 
outside the circle of the fire. Couples return arm in arm. Small 
groups, mostly of boys, leave — somebody's got dope — and 
return. Many of the girls and boys are deeply tanned. The 
sharp smell of the fire and of the sea air dominate, but under- 
neath, there are the sweeter, more tribal odors of coconut oil, 
cocoa butter, baby oil, and iodine. 

Shortly after my remark about Jeanine Clotfelter' s skin, a 
younger girl a Cindy somebody , shows up in the bright glow 
of the bonfin looking desperate, her cheeks streaked with 
tears. Jeanine, : ecreth happy to have arrived at some version 
of the melodrama she's been imagining ever since Perry's 
disappearance, finds Cindy's ann and pulls her over to where 
we are sitting. Lassie-like, Cindy manages to convey, not en- 
tirely verbally, that something terrible has happened, that we 

392 



should follow her to the spot. 

A half mile or so down the beach there's an old abandoned 
dirt road with a washed-out bridge; it's about an eight- or ten- 
foot drop down into a sand gully. Some of the wilder boys 
have been playing a little game, a daredevil's delight, for 
which Perry has been kind enough to lend our father's Lin- 
coln. On bur way to the abandoned road, Cindy explains — as 
best she can, for she's still crying — the game. The player sits 
behind the steering wheel of the Lincoln from a starting place 
of about a hundred yards from the washed-out bridge; with 
the headlights on bright, the player drives toward the gully; 
at about fifty yards^ — indicated by a boy stationed at the 
edge of the road — the driver turns off the headlights and, in 
complete darkness, continues forward as far as he dares. 
Naturally, the one who gets closest to the gully, without 
driving into the gully, wins. 

Cindy, frantic and hysterical, came running to fetch us just 
at the moment Perry was taking the wheel. But when we ar- 
rive on the scene, the game has reached its end — apparently 
only a moment earlier. With its headlights turned back on, ] 



'i expect just about anyboi 
given the right circumstanc 



Father's Lincoln squats like a big boat, no wheels visible, in the 
sand at the bottom of the gully; a great cloud of dust still rises and 
settles in the swaths of light in fi-ont of the car. The circle of boys 
surrounding the Lincoln is completely silent when we arrive, 
and they clear a path for us, silentiy, as we approach. When I 
lean down to look inside the window on the driver's side, I see 
Perry — Perry, with a look of miraculous wonder on his face: 
what has happened has left him quite speechless. His silence, 
like the other boys', is almost religious. He looks at me and 
smiles, shaking his head, his eyes wet with tears of joy. I say, 
"Jesus are you in trouble now . . . . " 

Of course I have failed to understand the moment, the 
event, and Perry is cosmically disappointed. He continues 
shaking his head, but his expression has changed to disgust. 
Finally, he says, quietly, which was always his way, "At 
least / know what kind of trouble I' m in , Martin . ' ' 

Now, in the taxi, my recalling Perry's young face, full of 
wonder, sent a brief but incisive jab of grief to my ribs, and 
my cabdriver, as if she were tracking my thoughts, began to 
hum, a different song, a melody I didn't recognize, some- 
thing altogether too melancholy. It occurred to me to tell her 
that my brother had just jumped out of a hotel window. After 
all, I hadn't said those words out loud yet, and it probably 
wouldn't be a bad idea to experiment; I suspected that as a 
cabdriver in New York City she knew something of grief. We 
were just passing through the toll plaza outside the Midtown 
Tunnel, the sky had brightened enough to cast an ambiguous 
glow over every thing — not day, not night — and the man who 
took the money, middle-aged with a droopy mustache and 
dark pouches beneath his eyes, looked sad and hopeless to 
me: one too many nights in the neon-lit tollbooth. 

I closed my eyes: the briefly pleasant stinging of exhaust 
fumes; the underground roar, like entering the whirling chan- 



iK 



fore 
paic 

»01I 



vogue fiction 



nel inside a giant conch shell . When I opened my eyes , maybe 
a minute later ,.the interior of the cab had taken on an unset- 
tling domestic look, and in the artificial lights of the tunnel, I 
noticed that my driver, no longer singing or humming, was 
glancing at me occasionally in her rearview mirror. After an- 
other quick series of curious glances, she said, "If you're 
cold back there, why don't you roll up the window?" 

As I cranked the window handle, which was missing its 
plastic, I realized I was visibly shaking, which triggered my 
awareness of a string of neglected physical needs: freezing 
coldness, hunger, and a by now completely bewildered blad- 
der. The tall black woman was nodding approvingly. I 
thought, judging only from her eyes, that she was also smil- 
ing. I cleared my throat and said, "I've had to come here be- 
cause my brother just died suddenly." 

"I beg your pardon?' ' she said, and I noticed that she had a 
surprisingly cultured note in her speech, as if she'd been 
trained in the theater. 

"I said my brother just died. ' ' 
. "Oh, that's too bad," she said. "Was he sick?" 



n blow their own brains out 



cind the bottle and the gun'' 



"No," I said. "He killed himself." 

"What a crying shame," she said. Then she added, quite 
without astonishment, "I had a brother killed himself, too." 

"That's amazing," I said. 

Out of the tunnel — only a nod to any transition at best — we 
were suddenly aimed at the heart of Manhattan. "Wasn't 
anything amazing about it," my cabdriver said, hanging a 
one-handed right turn that sent me teetering. "I expect just 
about anybody can blow their own brains out given the right 
circumstances — and the bottle and the gun. ' ' 

"I mean, isn't it amazing that here I am all the way from 
California," I said, "riding in the back seat of your cab, and 
we both have brothers who killed themselves. ' ' 

"Oh," she said, as unimpressed as only someone shrug- 
ging such wide and bony shoulders could be. "Just goes to 
show you, I guess." 

She'd begun a lively game of dodge and dart up Park Ave- 
nue. There was a surprising amount of traffic at this hour, and 
an assortment of drivers — a kind of estuary of the decadent 
and the ambitious. 

Uptown, in the Seventies, over to Fifth, down a couple of 
blocks, and we were stopped in front of my hotel. I had pur- 
posely avoided staying in midtown, frightened by the remote 
possibility of booking a room, by freakish coincidence, in the 
hotel. As I stood outside on the sidewalk, at the rear of the 
taxi, reaching into my pockets for cash, the cabdriver re- 
trieved my bags from the trunk and handed them over to a uni- 
formed doorman. When she told me the amount of the fare, I 
paid it, along with a tip, and then said, "I thought the fare 
would be at least . . . . " 

"I turned off the meter when you told me about y iur brother," 
she said, and as if I weren't already surprised eno' gh, she took 
both my hands into hers, which were huge and soft and warm. 



In a moment, I would have to turn toward the hotel's bright 
revolving doors at the end of a long arched canopy with brass 
poles and fittings, and toward an entirely stunned doorman; 
but just now, I was held firm in the grip of this unlikely navi- 
gator's sympathy — her ridiculous orange hair now clearly a 
wig, she herself now clearly a drag queen. And it must have 
bolstered me, because after she drove away I was able to ask 
the waiting doorman, without a trace of embarrassment, to 
hurry please and show me to the nearest men's room. 

After a hot bath in a wonderful, cavernous old tub, I or- 
dered room service; knowing I should keep it simple, I asked 
for scrambled eggs and an English muffin, tea instead of cof- 
fee, no meat. But when it arrived, caddied by a cheerful 
young man who clicked his heels after he'd set everything out 
for my approval, it was not quite simple enough. Though I'm 
sure the eggs were perfectly fine, they looked like something 
that might have grown at the bottom of a fish tank. As soon as 
the porter left the room, I quickly re-covered everything. 

Wearing a robe made of some unseemly shiny material, an 
anniversary present from Madeline — her favorite old actor 
was David Niven — I sat on the edge of 
the bed and stared at the telephone. After 
a minute or two I went to the windows, 
which, at the back of the hotel, over- 
looked a jagged sea of rooftops. I drew 
the drapes, hoping to shut out the city at 
least temporarily, and returned to my 
thinker's attitude on the edge of the bed. 
If there were a way to erase memory, to escape the resonant 
sway of the past, then calling my mother and telling her about 
Perry would be a simpler task. What I wanted was some way 
to unclutter the thing; I wanted it to be tidy, without echo. Al- 
ready, as I imagined my mother's voice, I was having to 
shake the absurd feeling that I was the tattletale, calling long 
distance to report Perry's having been bad again. And in a 
vaguer sort of way, I felt some mysterious allegiance to Perry 
that excluded any grief-sharing with our mother. I also need- 
ed very badly to sleep — I felt overwrought with fatigue rather 
than used up. 

It was nearly eight o'clock, but I knew Mother to be an ear- 
ly riser these days. I put through the call to Norfolk, and Ray- 
mond, the aging houseboy, answered. "It's Martin," I said, 
and we exchanged a few banalities about how long it had been 
since my last visit and so on. He told me that mother was al- 
ready in the pool. "She's a fanatic about her morning exer- 
cise, you kno w , " he said . " Hold on a second , Marty , and I'll 
just take the phone out to her. ' ' 

I could hear the sounds of a television , a morning news pro- 
gram, then the yapping of the dogs, a screen door slamming, 
and Raymond again, calling to Mother. When she came on 
the line. Mother was using her expansive, outdoor voice. 
"Marty," she said. "It's so early for you." 

"Mother, I'm calling from New York," I said. 

"New York?" 

" Yes . I ' m afraid I ' ve got some bad ne ws . " 

"Bad news?" 

"It's about Perry." 

"About Perry?" 

"Will you please stop doing that," I said. 

"Doing what?" 

"Repeating everything back to me. I'm trying to tell ► 420 



woman 

of character 

The truth is, when you sit and watch Julia Roberts bring an iced cap- 
puccino to those famous lips, her mouth isn't all that big. Nor, as crit- 
ics and admirers have also insisted, is her nose all that long, nor is her 
hair all that impetuous, nor is she quite so curvy as Daisy, the hip- 
jibing, fire-eyed waitress she played in Mystic Pizza. In fact, she 
seems downright diminutive compared with her image on film. 

"That's why they call it the Big Screen, babe," she says. 

Mystic Pizza is the movie that got Roberts out of curlers and 
Smyrna, Georgia, once and for all and plopped her down in Holly- 
wood, where she sat for a year until Steel Magnolias gave her an 
opportunity to put the curlers and the accent back on for the role of 
Sally Field's daughter. She played the sweet, sad-eyed, doomed 
Shelby (the only credible character in an otherwise incredible 
script, and a role as different as it could be from Daisy's exuberant 
wantonness) with understatement and conviction, and won a 
Golden Globe and an Oscar nomination for her trouble. Life's fun- 
ny that way; Roberts's is in any case. 

Her parents ran an actors' and writers' workshop when she was 
young, and as the little sister of ac- 
tors Eric and Lisa Roberts, Julia at 
first felt uncomfortable taking up 
acting herself. "I didn't want it to 
seem like I was doing it just be- 
cause the others were. But there 
comes a time when you have to 
own up to what's pulling you. ' ' 

Fate is something she believes 
in. She also believes in having 
strong beliefs, so as not to be sus- 
ceptible to those sold by Hollywood's brokers: money and power. 
She believes in truth and true love and happiness and angels and wish 
flowers and babies. She wears odd hats, five earrings, and Jean-Paul 

Actress Julia Roberts has a mind of her own — she's strong-willed and not 
afraid to tat<e chances. The clothes to match: the unabashedly bare, lingerie- 
inspired even!, g dresses, tops, and jumpsuits in this story. They're the dressier 
side of a n -w hybrid in fashion — outerwear that looks like innerwear. 
Jumpsuit by Emporio Armani, about $410. Emporio Armani Boutique, 
NYC, Ontario, Canada. These six pages: hair, Sally Hershberger; makeup, 
Carol Shaw. Details, more stores, last pages. 



Sweet southern gl 
Roberts is playing 
Hollywood for all itHwi 
Tom Christie repol 



Fashion Editor: Jenny Capitain 



Photographer: Helmut Newton 



kt 







*-y^WA 



;i 




^^w— ,,„,...„. Roberts, 

^ playing at2USh- 

tm beHe 
ill Tfi I f flf »|w»<fc to 
^ a big-heartc 

«!ftiite 
in P^^S^jltoiiMn, 
[es on the 

iitown 
style of Jean Paul 
Gaultier, THIS PAGE. 
— Black satin bra. 
Sequined top, about 

$640. Watch by 
Vacheron Constantin. 
OPPOSITE PAGE: Trying 

out a different 

persona — with a blond 

wig... plus Geoffrey 

Beene's lace jsUr — ' 
dMMTftbOUt $1,990^^ 
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Role models: CarolyneRoehm... 



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Betty Prodo 



On collection catwalks, designer/model 
look-alikes are partner in chic 

Carolyne Roehm uses the comparably c 'iffed Cathy Gallagher. Carolina 
Herrera favors the similarly tinted Dianr : DeWitt. And Lacroix's smile is 
almost identical to Marie Seznec's. Is the ancanny resemblance between de- 
signers and their model look-alikes purely coincidental? Or do the masters 
make runway stars in their own image? talking. . . ► 414 

VOGUE APRIL 1990 



Hair pair: Carolina Herrera 
and Dionne DeWitt 




«-,* Christ"- 1""°"' 




Designing duo: Laura Reiff 
and Giorgio Armani 

411 




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Vogue's spring spree: andre leon 
TALLEY goes couturc shopping in 
Paris for the ladies who dress 

SURROUNDED BY PRIME-TIME MEDIA HYPE AND RERCE SOCIAL 
politicking, couture week can be rather, well, wearing. 

No wonder, then, that so many ladies opted to take a more 
low-key approach to spending this season in Paris. Valentino's 
predinner show on Wednesday has become such a social bubble 
that one noted American client rescheduled her shopping hour to 
the much more discreet 10:00 A.M. private viewing on Sunday. 
At Yves Saint Laurent, front-row-seating politics escalated to 
the point where Susan Gutfreund and Jayne Wrightsman pre- 
ferred to keep a low profile in the fourth row of the designer's 
muchcalmer 5 :00 p.m. showing. But perhaps the most tell- ^416 



Flashdance: for ladies in 
the public eye, only a per- 
formance piece will do. For 
the rockers, Lacroix's Lycra 
cat suit steals the spotlight. 
For royalty, Valentino's 
beaded evening sweater 
and skirt dress up any 
greeting line. And for prima 
ballerinas, what else but 
Lacroix's apres-ballet tutu. 




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il wardrobe: with her latest slim look, Fergie is the 
ime of the new regal chic. For walking tours. Vogue 
lests Chanel's dusty pink suit. At state dinners, the 
rstated opulence of YSL is sure to upstage Diana. 




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new Mrs. Ungaro. who arrived early for her husband's 
show and slipped demurely into the back row. Natural- 
ly she has the advantage of stopping by his atelier any- 
time to pick out her dinner wear. 

But how do the rest of you shop down and still dress 
up? For those who prefer to spree discreetly. Vogue 
does the shopping for you — -with a skillful glance at the 
social texture and hierarchy of Paris, of course. So 
browse at your leisure . but please have your Swiss bank 
account numbers ready. talking... ►418 



Signature pieces: at each showing, the trained eye picks out 
pieces that could only be worn by a particular woman. La- 
croix's urban cowgirl outfit could only have been made for 
Texas's Georgette Mosbocher. And nobody would look bet- 
ter in Chanel's beaded dress, inspired by a Cortier cigarette 
box, than couture queen Jayne Wrightsman, who single-hand- 
edly supports the art of couture with large orders each sea- 
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VOGUE FICTION 

(Continued from page 393) 

you that Perry's had an accident." 

"An accident?" she said. 

' ' I don ' t know any other way to do this, " I said . ' except to say 
it. Mother. Perry's dead." 

There was a brief silence, then the splash of water, then her 
voice, away from the phone now: "Raymond, honey, will you 
please hand me my robe?" 

"Mother?" I said. 

"Yes, Marty, I'm here. I'm just trying to catch my breath. 
What happened?" 

"lonlyju.stgot intoahotel, ' I said. "I don't have any details 
yet, but the police think Perry killed himself." 

Another silence. Then, "I'm all right, Marty, I'm all right. 
Tell me what to do. I don't know what to do." 

"I don't really know anything yet," I said. "I think the thing 
to do is just sit tight and I'll keep in touch." 

"I dont know what to do," she said after a moment. "Tell me 
what I should do." 

"It's very hard to know," I said. "It's a shock." 

"A shock?" she said. "Is that what you call it? How did he do 
it? Jump out of a window or something? Something magnificent, 
surely. ..." 

"Yes," I said. 

"What?" 

"Yes, he jumped out of a window." 

"Oh, God. Oh, Marty, why?" 

"Idon'tknow," I said. "I'm going to try to find out." 

"Oh, Jesus." 

"Mother?" 

"Ijustfeel, Idon'tknow. . . .Why would he do such a thing?" 

"I don't know. Mother," I said. "When did you talk to him 
last?" 

"Well, I'm not sure. I don't have any idea why he did it, if 
that's what you're getting at." 

"I'm not getting at anything. Mother. Ijust wondered whether 
or not you talked to him recently." 

"I think Raymond talked to him," she said. "He called once 
when I was away, a couple of weeks ago. He talked to Ray- 
mond." 

"When was that exactly?" I asked. 

' ' Well , let ' :; see , " she said ." I was in Palm Beach . That would 
have been about ten days ago, I guess. Oh, Jesus, why can't I 
cry?" 

"Mother, will you tell Raymond what's happened and have 
him call me?" 

"Of course," she answered. "But you know Raymond's 
memory isn't what it used to be . " 

I gave her the number of the hotel and my room number. She 
said, "Marty. . . " 

"Yes, Mother." 

After a moment, she .said, "I don't know what I was going to 
say." 

"I'll call you later." I said. 

"I've got people coming for/Mm/?," she said. "Raymond's in 
the kitchen shelling shrimp. 

And then, after a pause, she said one word, tlat. without inflec- 
tion: "Perry." After she'd hungup, I sat listening to the clinking 
chains and wind tunnels over the line, a primitive-sounding mu- 
sic that .emed to darken the already half-dark hotel room. 

Perry and I are young boys, maybe nine and five, lying belly- 
down on iho sentle slope of the front lawn to the Norfolk house. 
Once again nigJftime. summer. We can hear music coming from 
Father's old -onsole radio in the library — Sinatra, something 
swingy. It's the hour that lies between dinner and bedtime. The 
help (as we were taught to call them, never servants) are gathered 
in the kitchen drinking coffee and cleaning up the dinner mess — 
it is a blissful hour in which, for once, during a long day of 
grown-up guesswork and petulance. Perry and I are precisely 



what we most want to be — forgotten. It is our chance to observe 
unobserved, for us to spin out a commentary unchecked by adult 
censure. But now we are mute as we lie on the grass in the dark, 
watching the broad, glowing French windows of the library. In- 
side, our parents. Father in his dark suit and Mother in a long 
gown, are dancing, and though their laughter sails above and be- 
low the music, as they lose and regain their footing again and 
again, they look as if they are wrestling: Mother, whirling, col- 
lapses onto a sofa. Father jerks her erect, they both fall against a 
desk, sending a lamp crashing to the fioor. and their immense 
shadows break across the library ceiling. It's a spectacular thing, 
and vaguely frightening, and when I turn to Perry, I see no mix- 
ture of emotions on his face. He likes it very much.» 

Excerpted from the forthcoming novel. The Music Room.Copy- 
right ^1990 by Dennis McFarland. to be published in April by 
Houghton Mifflin Company. 



TOYING WITH ART 

(Continued from page 388) 

angular balloons that surround words like Pow! and Kablaam! in 
comic books. 

Given all this, it is hardly surprising that one of the many 
things Zena wants to be when she grows up is "an assistant to an 
artist. An artist like my father." 

On Francesco and Alba Clemente's chestnut-colored kitch- 
en floor, m front of the carved wood fireplace, near the Shaker 
chairs and the Ettore Sottsass glass sculptures, beneath a Cle- 
mente still life, are two Tonka trucks. Like most Tonkas, they 
are big and yellow and trucklike. Unlike other Tonkas, these 
have been personalized by Keith Haring. They are wonderful 
objects, covered in Haring's signature shapes and figures. 
They are trucks many adults would pine for. But from the 
names in Haring-esque block letters on the side of the cement 
mixer and on the bucket of the bulldozer, it's easy to read 
whom they belong to: the Clementes' two-and-a-half-year-old 
twin boys, Pietro and Andrea. 

It seems fitting in a house as aesthetically orchestrated as the 
Clementes' — with its walls painted in soft, weathered yellows 
and greens, its old pine country furniture, and the occasional 
shock of a Memphis-style bookcase or plant stand — that even the 
toys look like art.* 

GRAF'S DASH 

(Continuedfrom page 350) 

this time he misses completely. "A twenty handicap for sure, 
you'll see." he snaps. He gives it another try. The ball zithers 
across the fairway and again goes into the lake, scattering a 
cluster of ducks. 

Meanwhile, Steffi is sharp)ening her own killer instincts at the 
local tennis complex against a rated player on the men's tour. 
Punctuating every shot with a loud expletive, she approaches 
each ball as if it were a decisive point at Wimbledon. Steffi's 
ground strokes are now a beautiful ballet of power and precision, 
and by coming to the net repeatedly, she comes back from a 2-6 
disadvantage to tie the set at 6-6. Her serve is booming, beyond 
the reach of her adversary. A series of aces and wicked passing 
shots give her the match. "I just didn't play well today, not at 
all," she laments, walking off the court. She looks even more 
disgusted when, back at the house, she notices a German news- 
paper lying near her father. Emblazoned in headlines is a report 
that her romance with Alex Mronz, a Cologne tennis player, is 
"officially over. ' ' For almost a year, the West German press has 
publicly speculated about their relationship, particularly won- 
dering whether the pair were sleeping together. The gossipy arti- 
cles have long angered Graf, and she says irritably, "I don't 
know where these papers get this stuff. I didn't tell anyone. 



420 



VOGLiE APRIL 1990 



"Alex and I were serious. We practiced together and had some 
fun times. But I don't want to be with someone similar to me. I 
know Chris [Evert] and her husband had tennis careers together, 
yet I really think this is bad. it's much better todo separate things. 
If I'm playing, I don't want to talk tennis — it's too much. I'm 
happy to hear something else, to speak about music, books, poli- 
tics — I'mnot living just to talk about my matches." 

Apparently feeling she's divulging too much about her private 
life , she covers her eyes with her hands . ' 'There' s no one new in my 
life right now, yet that doesn't mean I'm not interested. Marriage 
and a happy family that really works are vital to me." Living in the 
public glare, surrounded by demanding fans, hucksters, media peo- 
ple, and assorted sponsors, Graf knows she has little free time to 
cultivate a relationship. She also admits men are intimidated by her 
celebrity, that "they don't know how to treat me at times. They're 
afraid of interfering with the tennis. They make too much of this star 
thing. But I'm still having a good time. I'm feeling strong, I know I 
can play better tennis, and meeting new guys won't be a problem. 
They just have to know I'm a normal person, not special or scary. 
I'm just me. "• 



MAGGIE SMITH 

(Continued from page 381 ) 

and English should have entered the theater; except that there are 
precedents (the best: Celia Johnson, Edith Evans, Peggy Ashcroft). 
These actresses could turn your heart because they composed their 
work around feelings they kept from public view. 

"Weren't you engaged to Beverley Cross before you married 
Robert Stephens?" 

This is dangerous stuff where this actress is concerned. A no-go 
area is immediately signaled in the Klaxon tone of her voice. 

"Mmmm," alarmingly loud. "IremethiminLondon. It all end- 
ed happily. 

"A lovely, lovely end. " She draws a final line across that avenue 
of discussion. 

Expecting her to go further is like expecting Samuel Beckett to 
paraphrase his plays. She says she just gets on with her work and 
tries not to bump into the furniture . Perhaps she could add another to 
her list of honors: the Nobel prize for understatement. • 



HANDS ON 

(Continued from 376) 

calls its two-person massage quatre mains. "Two massage thera- 
pists work in unison, in a kind of dance, one spontaneously reacting 
to the techniques that the other is using on the opposite side of the 
body," explains Savoy's Mary Clare Ditton. "Many clients tell us 
it ' s the best massage they ' ve ever had . " 

Four-handed massage at the Catherine Atzen Day Spas in New 
York City (a new one has just opened at the Henri Bendel specialty 
store on West Fifty-seventh Street) begins with one massage thera- 
pist at a client's feet, performing reflexology, and another at the 
head, giving a scalp and facial massage. 

Custom-designed massage is beginning to be stres.sed at many sa- 
lons and spas. At the Atzen spas, clients fill out questionnaires 
about particular problems — a knot in the shoulder or a lower back- 
ache, for example — and the type of massage they prefer. "Many 
salons now offer massage together with other beauty services as part 
of a wellness approach to beauty," explains Robert King, president 
of the American Massage Therapy Association (A.MTA). "For in- 
stance, there are aromatherapy massages using difterent herbal oils 
that are said to be good for the skin, and exfoliation massages using 
skin-peeling products and tools." 

Gary Tacon, who has a private practice in New York, works with 
clients to help "soften" tense muscles. "1 have an image of tight 
muscles being like a dried sponge, and my job is to soften the mus- 
cle until it begins to reach the texture of a wet sponge," he says. 
"It's very easy to detect . ' ' 



Massage owes much of its new legitimacy to sports medicine, 
and medical studies carried out on athletes show that after a 
workout, massage can speed the rate at which sore muscles heal. 
Recent research indicates there can be benefits, too, for chemo- 
therapy patients. 

The results aren't all in yet, but massage conducted before or af- 
ter chemotherapy seems to reduce many of the ill effects of treat- 
ment, including muscle p. ins, nausea, and poor appetite, says 
Joyce Kakkis, M.D., assistant clinical professor of obstetrics and 
gynecology at the University of California, Irvine, School of Medi- 
cine. "We also know that cancer recovery in general is improved by 
a positive mental attitude, and massage can improve outlook," she 
says. "Stress is well known to have a negative effect on many ill- 
nesses. By reducing stress, massage has a positive effect. " 

Those who give massage to handicapped, elderly, or AIDS pa- 
tients also find that these clients respond well. 

"In most cases, these are people who are just not touched often 
enough," says Therese Forsthoefel, consultant for the Chicago 
School of Massage Therapy's Outreach program. "Just the fact 
that someone wants to touch them and make them feel good can 
have a tremendous effect on their sense of self-esteem. ' ' 

Many doctors now feel that massage can act as a bridge be- 
tween what used to be called a therapeutic touch and modem 
medicine. "As medicine becomes more impersonal and high- 
tech, with machines replacing talk and touch, massage can re- 
mind us of the value of human touch," says Richard Dominguez, 
M.D., orthopedic surgeon and a medical director of the 
SportMed Center for Physical Fitness in Chicago. "But it must 
be realized that results are temporary. It's unlikely, for instance, 
that massage could 'cure' a bad back, which obviously requires 
treatment of the underlying factors causing the problem." 

Though risks with most massages are generally few, massages 
are still not for everyone. People with a history of blood clots or 
phlebitis, or anyone with a skin infection, should avoid them. 
Pregnant women or individuals with any chronic condition 
should consult their physician first. 

Fifteen states in the country require massage therapists to be 
licen.sed. If your state isn't one of them, look for a member of the 
AMTA. which requires members to maintain ethical and profes- 
sional standards. Find out where the therapist was trained and 
check into the reputation of the training institute. Affiliation with 
a first-rate medical or sports center or health or beauty spa is an- 
other sign of professionalism. 

Make no mistake: a bad massage falls somewhere in between a 
bad meal and a bad romance in terms of life's tragedies, so be 
sure to do some research before you bare your tense body to a 
stranger. For more information, contact the American Massage 
Therapy Association: (312) 764- 1 785 . • 



WOMAN OF CHARACTER 

(Continued from page 398) 

tooth is exposed. (Nice teeth, too.) "How are you going to de- 
scribe me?" 

"I don't know." She really wants to know. "Well," I say, 
"remember those games we played as kids, where you cut out 
mouths and noses and eyes of different people in magazines and 
then you mix them all up? " 

"So you're saying I have mismatched strips?" 

"Well, they just seem mismatched. But they go well togeth- 
er — like apples and cheese. " 

She considers this for a moment. "One thing I want to say: I 
did not have a lip implant. My lips are the way they were when I 
was bom!" 

Roberts is beginning to feel stared at. She pulls out her eyeball 
key chain, and we walk down Poinsettia Place to our cars. In the 
morning she u ill fly to the Arizona desert for a rest. I take a few 
steps, then turn back to warn her not to pick any desert flowers — 
they're protected. But she's already climbed into her new BMW 
and started it up. • 



VOC, IE A P K 1 I. 1990 



421 



IN THIS ISSUE 



Details, prices, more stores, more":.. on this month's looks 



4: Accessories, Yves Saint Laurent. 86: 
Top left: silk, polyamide, and Lurex jacket 
(priced with skirt not shown, $2,780). Christian 
Lacroix Luxe. Martha, NYC; Saks Jandel, 
Chevy Chase MD. Glasses, Christian Lacroix 
Haute Couture. Earrings, Christian Lacroix. 
Center: Gordon Henderson wool gabardine 
jacket, $370, skirt, $136. and silk and cotton 
cardigan, $116. Nan Duskin, Philadelphia, 
Baltimore. Jacket and cardigan at Saks Fifth 
Avenue. Hat, $130. Bergdorf Goodman; Ulti- 
mo Ltd., Chicago. Top right: suit, Chanel 
Haute Couture by Karl Lagerfeld. Bottom right: 
shoes, Sam & Libby, California. Blooming- 
dale's; Macy's, California. 101: Right: dress. 
Christian Lacroix Haute Couture Collection. 
Credit, left: Saint Elizabeth of Portugal by Zur- 
baran: reproduced from Zurbardn, published by 
the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. 
104: 3) Dress, Chanel Haute Couture by Karl 
Lagerfeld. Credits: 1 ) Watercolor by Sonia De- 
launay : ® 1 990 ARS New York/ADAGP; 4) Ma- 
dame Recamier by Jacques-Louis David: 
SuperStock. 106: 2) Suit, Valentino Haute Cou- 
ture. 4) Dress, Yves Saint Laurent Couture. 6) 
Dress, Yves Saint Laurent Couture. Credits: 1) 
Wide World Photos; 3) Darlene Hammond/ 
Neal Peters; 5) Poster info.: by Christian Ber- 
ard; photo by Christian Larrieu; private collec- 
tion. 114: 1) Suit, Yves Saint Laurent Couture. 
3) Dress, Yves Saint Laurent Couture. Credits: 
2) Pictorial Parade; 4) New York Public Library 
Dance Collection. 126: 3) Jeans, Levi's. Belt at 
American Rag Cie, Los Angeles. 130: Shoes, 
Manolo Blahnik, NYC. 142: All accessories, 
Mercedes Robirosa. Linda Dresner, NYC. 2) 
Clockwise, from top left comer: chain and pearl 
necklace, $530. Pearl earrings with tassel, 
$190. Heart-shaped earrings with pearls, $275. 
Teardrop and pearl earrings, $160. Triple swirl 
and pearl earrings, $250. Hoop earrings with 
white and "gold" pearls, $275. Center: gold 
and pearl necklace, $690. 3) Goldfish brooch, 
$200. Necklace. $450. Bracelet, $375. Earring 
with hanging star, $700. Handbag, $530. Pin 
with hanging round button, $450. 4) Hat, $500. 
158: Steve Fabrikant & Company linen dress. 
$380. Tootsie's. Houston; I. Magnin. Neck- 
lace, Karl Lagerfeld Bijoux. Bergdorf Good- 
man; 1 Magnin. Gloves, Mario Valentino. 
Mario Valentino Boutique, NYC. Bag, Prada, 
NYC, Beveriy Hills. 222: Embroidered and se- 
quined silk organza dress with belt, $4,820, 
Mary McFadden Couture. Saks Fifth Avenue; 
Troy, Palm Desert CA. Earrings, Bijoux Pel- 
lini. Necklace, Jay Feinberg. Saks Fifth Ave- 
nue, NYC. Calvin Klein Hosiery. Shoes, 
Gianni Versace 



Scene at the couture 

327: Left: wool day suit. Chane Haute Couture 
by Karl Lagerfeld. Acces.sories ; ; d shoes, Cha- 
nel. 328: Wool crepe jacket and ^kirt, Chanel 
Haute Couture by Karl Lagerfeld. Accessories 
and shoes, Chanel. 330: Silk chiffon dress, Cha- 



422 





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SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Cigarette 
Smoke Contains Carbon Monoxide. 



IN THIS ISSUE 




nel Haute Couture by Karl Lagerfeld. Earrings. 
Chanel. 331: Left: silk chiffon gown. Right: wool 
jacket. Both by Chanel Haute Couture by Karl La- 
gerfeld. Accessories and shoes. Chanel. 332: Silk 
faille coat. Christian Lacroix Haute Couture Col- 
lection. Accessories, Christian Lacroix Haute 
Couture. 333: Left: silk faille coat, Yves Saint 
Laurent Couture. Glasses. Paloma Picasso. Ear- 
rings and hat. Yves Saint Laurent. 335: Lycra uni- 
tard. Christian Lacroix Haute Couture 
Collection. Accessories. Christian Lacroix Haute 
Couture. Shoes. Christian Lacroix by special or- 
der. 336: Black silk organza sequined dress and 
silk floral dress, both by Yves Saint Laurent Cou- 
ture. Accessories. Yves Saint Laurent. 337: Silk 
chiffon dress. Chanel Haute Couture by Karl La- 
gerfeld. Accessories and shoes. Chanel. 338- 
339: Silk satin and silk faille dress. Yves Saint 
Laurent Couture. Accessories, Yves Saint Lau- 
rent. 340: Silk dress, accessories, and shoes. Ate- 
lier Versace. 341: Silk beaded and feathered 
dress. Christian Lacroix Haute Couture. 342: 
Embroidered dress and earrings, Emanuel Un- 
garoCouture. 345: Silk chiffon dress and accesso- 
ries, Emanuel Ungaro Couture. Shoes. Emanuel 
Ungaro. 346: Silk organza sweater dress. Yves 
Saint Laurent Couture. Accessories and shoes. 
Yves Saint Laurent. 347: Silk gazar dress with satin 
organza train, Yves Saint Laurent Couture. Acces- 
sories, Yves Saint Laurent. 

Grafs dash 

349: Aniron and Lycra suit. 351 : Crepe and Lycra 
suit also at Caron Cherry, Coconut Grove FL. 
352: For info, see page 353. 353: Cotton and Ly- 
cra dress. Earrings at Martha International NYC; 
Tabandeh, Washington DC. Watch at Toumeau, 
NYC: Shreve & Co., San Francisco. Shoes at 
Eric, NYC: Saint Germaine, New Orleans. 



The new short story 

354-355: 1 ) Cotton and polyamide jacket and 
shorts, Azzedine Alaia. Barneys New York; 
Alaia chez Gallay, Beverly Hills; Gallay, West 
Hollywood CA. 2) Linen jacktt and shorts, 
Fendi. Fendi, NYC; Neiman M.rcus. 3) Silk 
jacket, top. and shorts. Christian Dior Boutique 
Jacket and top. Bergdorf Goodman; Panache. 
Millburn NJ. 4) Silk jackci and cotton twill 



shorts. Calvin Klein. Bergdorf Goodman; Mary 
Jane Denzer. White Plains NY; Montaldos; Nei- 
man Marcus; Nordstrom. San Diego. 5) Linen 
jacket and shorts, Chanel. Barneys New York. 
Hat and bag, Chanel. Earrings and necklaces. 
Dominique Aurientis. Paris. Earrings and chain 
necklace at Bergdorf Goodman. Pearl necklace at 
Neiman Marcus. 6) Cotton jacket and shorts, 
studded shirt. Isaac Mizrahi. Jacket and shorts. 
Saks Fifth Avenue; Dayton's, Minneapolis; Scar- 
boro Fair. Glencoe IL. Jacket. Neiman Marcus. 
Glasses. Modo. My Optics. NYC. Bracelet. Tom 
Binns. Bag. Prada. Barneys New York; Prada, 
Beverly Hills. 2. 3) Guy Marineau. 356-357: 1) 
Linen jacket and shorts. Claude Montana. Jim- 
my's, Brooklyn; Diagonale. San Francisco. Jack- 
et in the background. Isaac Mizrahi. Bracelet. 
Tom Binns. Bag. Moschino Handbags. 2) Jacket 
($3,650) and shorts. Hermes. Hermes Boutique. 
NYC. Boston. Chicago. Palm Beach FL. Dallas. 
Houston. Beverly Hills. San Francisco. Honolu- 
lu. 3) Linen blouse. Chanel. $565. Chanel Bou- 
tique. NYC. Beverly Hills. Accessories. Chanel. 
4) Cotton jacket and silk chiffon shorts. Karl La- 
gerfeld. Bloomingdale's; Chez Catherine. Cana- 
da. Jacket at Nan Duskin. Philadelphia; Wilkes 
Bashford, San Francisco. Bracelet. Edouard 
Rambaud. 5) Cotton jacket, bra. and shorts. Az- 
zedine Alaia. Alaia chez Gallay. Beverly Hills; 
Gallay. West Hollywood CA. Jacket and shorts. 
Barneys New York. Bra and shorts. Emphatics. 
Pittsburgh. Shorts. Caron Cherry. Coconut 
Grove FL; Neiman Marcus. 6) Silk crepe bustier 
and shorts. Moschino Couture. Carol Rollo/Rid- 
ing High. NYC; Neiman Marcus. Earrings. Les 
Bernard. NYC. Bracelet. Tom Binns. Bag. Mos- 
chino Handbags. Shoes. Stuart Weitzman. 7) Silk 
jacket and linen top and shorts. Krizia. Krizia 
Boutique, NYC, Palm Beach FL, Chicago. Dal- 
las. Houston. 8) Cotton canvas coat and shorts, 
cashmere sweater ($425). Michael Kors. Berg- 
dorf Goodman; Hirshleifer's. Manhasset NY; 
Nan Duskin. Philadelphia. Baltimore; Stanley 
Korshak. Chicago. Coat and shorts. Neiman Mar- 
cus. Necklace. Karl Lagerfeld Bijoux. Bag. Rich- 
ard Bienen. Shoes. Stuart Weitzman. 9) Silk twill 
shirt and bra and cotton shorts. Hermes. Hermes 
Boutique. NYC, Boston. Palm Beach FL. Chica- 
go. Dallas. Houston. San Francisco. Honolulu. 
Earrings. Butler& Wilson. West Hollywood CA. 
Necklace. Goossens-Paris. Bag. Prada. Prada. 
NYC; Ultimo Ltd. . Chicago. 2,3,5, 7) Guy Marin- 
eau. 

Designers: beachside 

358: Lycra suit also at Chanel Boutique, Beveriy 
Hills. Accessories. Chanel. Earrings. Chanel 
Boutique. NYC. Palm Beach FL. Flower brace- 
let. Chanel Boutique. NYC. Chicago. 359: Lycra 
suit also at Chanel Boutique. Palm Beach FL. 
Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco. Accesso- 
ries, Chanel. Earrings, Chanel Boutique, Chica- 
go. Beveriy Hills. Bracelets. Chanel Boutique. 
NYC. Chicago. 360: Lycra suit and leggings also 
at Hermes Boutique. Boston. Houston. San Fran- 
cisco. Glasses. Christian Lacroix Haute Couture. 
EarringN. Jose & Maria Barrera. Martha Interna- 
tional. NYC; Neiman Marcus. Belt. Yves Saint 
Laurent Collection. Yves Saint Laurent Rive 
Gauche Boutique Femme NYC; Esplanade. Las 
Vegas; Amen Wardy, Newport Beach. Beveriy 
Hills CA. Bag. Paloma Picasso. Ultimo Ltd . 
Chicago. 361: Lycra suit. Towel. Fendi. NYC. 
362: Left: Lycra suit. All accessories. Christian 
Lacroix. Earrings and bracelets. Saks Fifth A\e- 
nue. Shoes, Manolo Blahnik. Manolo Blahnik. 
NYC; I. Magnin. Right: Lycra .suit. Accessories. 
Christian Lacroix. Earrings and square bracelet at 



Saks Fifth Avenue. BrtxKh at BhKimmgdale's. 
"Gold" link charm bracelet. Butler & Wilson. 
Los Angeles. Shoes. Manolo Blahnik. See stores 
above 363: Earrings. Bergdort" Goodman. Towel 
at Hermes Boutique. NYC. San Francisco. 364: 
Left: rayon and elastin suit also at Gitobet. 
Edgewater NJ ; Caron Cherry . Coconut Grove FL; 
Alaia chez Gallay. Beverly Hills. Polyamide and 
polyurethane raincoat. Azzedine Alaia. $805. 
For stores see page 364 Shoes. Azzedine Alaia. 
Right: rayon and elastin suit also at Caron Cherry. 
Bal Harbour FL; Neiman Marcus Polyamide and 
polyurethane raincoat, .'\zzedine Alaia. $805. 
See stores on page 364. Also at Caron Cherry. Bal 
Harbour FL. Shoes. Azzedine Alaia. 365: Lycra 
suit. Earrings. Les Bernard. Bracelets. Jay Fein- 
berg. Bloomingdale's. Shoes. Manolo Blahnik. 
NYC. 366: Matte Lycra and nylon suit. Robe. 
$72. Bloomingdale's; I. Magnin. Shoes. Azze- 
dine Alaia. 367: Earrings. Jose & Maria Barrera. 
Martha International. NYC; Neiman Marcus. 
Bracelets on model's right arm. wrist to cuff: 
DKNY. A Division of Erwin Peari. Lord & Tay- 
lor; Jay Feinberg. Bergdorf Goodman; Jay Fein- 
berg. Bohwit Teller. NYC. Bag. Renaud Pelle- 
grino. Bergdorf Goodman; Wilkes Bashford. San 
Francisco. 

Second skin 

368: Rayon and linen hot pants. Jean Paul Gaul- 
tier. $375. For stores see page 368. 369: Cardi- 
gan. $425. N. Peal. NYC. San Francisco. Shoes. 
Manolo Blahnik. NYC. 370: Polyester and Lycra 
jumpsuit. $4,000. Terry-cloth robe. $180. Paul 
Smith. NYC. Shoes, Keds Corporation. 371: 
Polyurethane suit, Issey Miyake Swimsuit. 

Front and center 

372: Silk dress to order at Patricia Morange. Bev- 
eriy Hills. 374: Beaded top and silk skirt. Ear- 
rings. Jose & Maria Barrera. Martha 
International. NYC; Tabandeh. Washington DC; 
Neiman Marcus. 375: Viscose and acetate top and 
skirt. To order at stores on page 375. Earrings. 
Yves Saint Laurent Rive Gauche. Shoes. Stuart 
Weitzman. Rotary Torso Machine courtesy of 
Cybex. a division of Lumex. 

Toying with art 

382: Right: pants. Space Kiddets. Left: dress. 
Bonpoint Boutique. NYC. Shoes. Space Kiddets. 
383: Top and skirt. Claude Veil at Bebe Thomp- 
son. NYC. 384: Top and pants. Space Kiddets. 
NYC. 385: Dress. Bonpoint Boutique. NYC. 
386: Dress. Sonia Rykiel at Bebe Thompson. 
NYC. 387: Shorts. Jordache Kids. 388: Clothing 
by 012 Benetton. 389: Clothing by Space Kid- 
dets. NYC 



424 





I 



Woman of character 

395: Rayon jumpsuit. Earrings. Linda Faddis. 
Bracelet, Tom Binns. 396: Top and w(X)l pants, 
Jean Paul Gaultier. Wool pants, S565. Barneys 
New York, Manhasset NY, Short Hills NJ, Chest- 
nut Hill MA, Costa Mesa CA, Seattle. 397: Silk 
chaimeuse dress. The World of Geoffrey Beene. 
The Shop of Geoffrey Beene. NYC: The Twenty- 
FourCollection, Miami; Neiman Marcus. 399: Ac- 
etate and viscose dress also at John Wanamaker; 1. 
Magnin. Accessories, Yves Saint Laurent Rive 
Gauche. Yves Saint Laurent Footwear. 



Dress lineup 

400: Left; silk georgette dress. Martha Interna- 
tional, NYC; Gitobet, Edgewater NJ: Toby Ler- 
ner, Philadelphia and Ardmore PA; Andria, Bal 
Harbour FL: Ingrid, Quebec, Canada. Earrings, 
Jay Feinberg. Bracelet, Karl Lagerfeld Bijoux. 
Bergdorf Go(Kiman: I. Magnin. Bag, Jill Stuart. 
Bergdorf Goodman: Toby Lemer, Philadelphia 
and Ardmore PA. Right: silk dress, $2,455. Va- 
lentino Boutique, NYC. Hat, Valentino. Ear- 
rings, Jose & Maria Barrera. Martha 
International, NYC; Neiman Marcus. Bracelet, 
Jay Feinberg. 401: Cotton and viscose dress. 
Chanel Boutique, NYC, Washington DC, Chica- 
go, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco. Hat, 
Patricia Underwood. Bergdorf Goodman. 
Glasses, Chanel. Earrings, Chanel. Chanel 
Boutique, Washington DC, San Francisco. 
Gloves, Chanel. Chanel Boutique, San Francis- 
co, Honolulu. 402: Left: jacket and dress, 
$3,990. Earrings, Eric Beamon. Shoes, Andrea 
FTister. Center: dress also at Calvin Klein Store, 
Dallas; 1. Magnin. Earrings, Jay Feinberg. Saks 
Fifth Avenue. Bag from the Marilyn Scher Col- 
lection. Shoes, Maud Frizon, NYC. Right: silk 
chiffon dress, also at Jamie, Nashville. Earrings, 
Eric Beamon. Neiman Marcus. Shoes. Manolo 
Blahnik, NYC. 403: Left: silk dress. Earrings, 
Jay Feinberg. Bloomingdale's. Shoes, Stuart 
Weitzman. Right: polyester chiffon dress, 
$2,210. Shoes, Christian Lacroix by special or- 
der. 404: Silk dress, $2,490. Earrings, Jose & 
Maria Barrera. Martha International, NYC: Ta- 
bandeh, Washington DC. Bag, Renaud Pelle- 
grino. Shalimar Gloves. Shoes, Manolo Blahnik, 
NYC. 405: Silk and Lurex dress. $5,600. Ear- 
rings. Christian Lacroix. Bag, Rochas Paris. 
Shoes, Christian Lacroix by special order. 406: 
Left: cotton and viscose dress. Hat, eairings, and 
gloves, Fendi, NYC. Bag, Paloma Picasso. Berk- 
shire Hosiery. Shoes, Fendi. NYC. Right: cotton 
dress and viscose crepe blouse. Accessories, Karl 



Lagerfeld. Berkshire Hosiery. Shoes. Fratelli 
Rossetti. Fratelli Rossetti, NYC: Silhouette. 
Chevy Chase MD. 407: Left: silk dress. $2,370. 
Bracelet. Valentino. Valentino Boutique. NYC. 
Dallas. Beverly Hills. Shoes. Valentino. Center: 
rayon crepe dress. Earrings and bracelets. Eric 
Beamon. Charivari. NYC; Neiman Marcus. Na- 
omi Misle Gloves. Shoes. Manolo Blahnik. 
NYC. Right; cotton pique dress. $2,350. Also at 
Miss Jackson's, Tulsa. Glasses, Modo. Earrings, 
Stuart Freeman Design. Shoes, Manolo Blahnik, 
NYC. 408: Left: linen dress. Hat, Patricia Under- 
wood. Watch, Raymond Weil. Bags, Prada, 
NYC. Right: linen dress. Hat. Patricia Under- 
wood. 409: Left: linen dress. Hat, Patricia Under- 
wood. Watch, Raymond Weil. Center: dress, 
$2,050. Also at Gianni Versace Boutique, Coco- 
nut Grove FL, San Francisco. Earrings, Gianni 
Versace. Bag, Fred Hayman, Beverly Hills. 
Shoes, Gianni Versace. Right: earrings. Jay Fein- 
berg. Bag, Fred Hayman, Beverly Hills. Shoes, 
Manolo Blahnik, NYC. 414: Madonna: Scull/ 



Globe Photos; Gloria von Thum und Taxis: Sipa 
Press; Princess Diana: Alpha/Globe; Sylvie Guil- 
lem; Sygma; collection shots: Guy Marineau. 
415: Duchess of York (from top to bottom): Rex 
Features, Alpha/Globe, Sipa Press, London Fea- 
tures; collection shots: Guy Marineau; promi- 
nently suitable (from top to bottom): Sao 
Schlumberger: Roxanne Lowit; Jayne Wrights- 
man: Ron Galella; Judy Taubman:Thom H. Shel- 
by; Deeda Blair: Bertrand Rindoff; collection 
shots: Guy Marineau. 416: Anne Bass: Savig- 
nano/Ron Galella: Diane von Furstenberg: Savig- 
nano/Ron Galella: Susan Gutfreund: Mary 
Hilliard; Jacqueline de Ribes: Sygma; Evangeline 
Blahnik: Diana Cochran; Paloma Picasso: Ron 
Galella; Carolyne Roehm: Roxanne Lowit; Catie 
Marron: Cutty McGill; Tma Turner: Globe Pho- 
tos; Georgette Mosbacher: Ron Galella; collec- 
tion shots: Guy Marineau. 426: Top right: 
Emporio Armani Footwear by Maraolo. Second 
row, left: Ralph Lauren Footwear. Center: Calvin 
Klein Footwear. ALL PRICES APPROXIMATE. 



VOGUB IS A RHGI.STKREDTRADhMARK OF ADVANCK MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC . PUBLISHEDTHROUGH ITS DIVI- 
SION. THE CONDE NAST PUBLICATIONS INC COPYRIGHT ■ I99() BY THE CONDE NAST PUBLICATIONS INC ALL 
RIGHTS RESERVED PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. 

Vogue ISSN 0042-8000 is published monlhly by The Conde Nasi Publicalions Inc . 9 100 Wilshire Boulevard. Beverly Hills. CA 902 12 
PRINCIPAL OFFICE; .150 Madison Avenue. New York. NY 10017. Bernard H. Leser. President; Eric C. Anderson. Treasurer; Pamela 
M. van /andt. Secretary. Second-Class p<istage paid at Beverly Hills. CA. and at additional mailing olTices. Authon/ed as Second Class 
itiail by the Post Office Depamnent. Ottawa, and lor payment of postage in cash Maga/ine Registration File No 901.1 Subscriptions in 
UfS and possessions. $2X for one year; $.'i4 for two years In Canada. S47 for one year. S92 for two years. Elsewhere. %M) for one year, 
payable in advance Single copies in U.S.. S.t; in Canada. $.1 .SO For subscriptions, address changes, and adjustments, write to VOGUE. 
Box -'i59X(). Boulder. CO 80.122 Eight weeks arc required for change of address Please give both new and old address as printed on last 
label First copy of new subscription will be mailed within eight weeks after receipt of order. VOL 1 80. NO 4. WHOLE NO .1297 
Manuscripts, drawings, and other material submitted must be accompanied by a stamped self-addressed envelope Vogue is not responsi- 
ble for loss, damage, orany other injury as to unsolicited manuscripts, unsolicited artwork (including but not limited to drawings, photo- 
graphs, or transparencies) or any other unsolicited material 

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to VOGUE, Box 55980, Boulder CO 80322. 

SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIRS: Please write to VOGUE, Box SS980, Boulder. CO 80322 or call (800) 234-2347. Address all editori- 
al, business, and production correspondence to Vogue Maga/ine. 1.S0 Madison Avenue. New York. NY 1(X)1 7 





404-405 



■*— ^^^^W^P^^iH 



Yosrue s last look 



Editor: Candy Pratts Price 





6U 



It was the icon of the exerciseK)bsessed eighties. Now 
the sneaker leaves behind high tech in favor of high fashion 



THF. EIGHTIES SAW THE BIRTH OF A SNEAKER FOR EVERY 
purpose — from Nike and Reebok basketball shoes that 
pump up with air to Rockport's shoes for the urban 
walker. Wi h no sport left sneakerless, the chic sneaks 
of the nineties emphasize form over function. 

Sneaker popularity has grown continuously since the 
original Keds were introduced in 1916, but it skyrock- 
eted during the fitness boom of the past decade. Ree- 



bok, first to launch women's aerobic shoes, saw sales 
in the eighties rise from $1.3 million to $1 .8 billion. 

Today the line between fashion and fitness has 
blurred. The most recent entrants into the sneaker mar- 
ket are fashion designers who are stamping the basic 
canvas and rubber with their signature style. Even Cha- 
nel has created an ultrachic version because, as Karl 
Lagerfeld says, "life is a playground. "• 



426 



\ OO I' E APRIL 1990 



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FASHION 

76 
Fashion clips 

By Page Hill Starzinger 

81-118 
Vogue's view 

Short trench coats — bright and patterned— have become the 

accessory of choice . . . Designer boutiques are once again on the 

rise. Jody Shields charts their evolution. . .Randolph Duke is 

making a career out of thumbing his nose at the fashion 

establishment. Stephanie Mansfield asks why 




122 
V Elements 

Hats: the ultimate extension of the new 
feminine fashion message 

227 

Point of view 

228 
Tropical whites 

Kenya's the setting for a summer show of white. 

Worn dazzling or unadorned, it's designers' first choice. 

Photographer, Hans Feurer 

246 
The real ivana 

In private, Ivana Trump shows off a softer style 

254 
Pucci 

It's back; that dazzle-the-eye clash of vivid color and pattern that 
signals the end of an era of black 

260 
Dress whites 

White, the coolest color for hot weather, takes on a sleek, urban 
look when it's chosen for linen suits, lace trenches 

302 
Dress for less: the new sportswear 

Anoraks and shorts began as gritty ail-American gear. European 

designers raised them to couture status. Now the Americans 

strike back — with chic interpretations in navy and white 

311-318 
Talking... 

Here revealed, the smart set's nightly take of loot bags. . .When 

designer Michael Kors takes his show on the road, Rachel 

Urquhart finds, the star remains in the dressing room and the 

audience emerges in sequins . . . Designing mothers 

326 
In this issue 

Details, prices, stores, more 

330 
Vogue's last look 

Proof that tote bags don't have to look utilitarian to do the job — 
for summer there's an explosion of patterns and colors ^6 



COVER LOOK The new loolc for Ivana Trump comes from "a 
blending of shades that just lightly color the face," says 
makeup artist Vincent Longo, who used different brushes to 
layer lip and eye colors. On lips, he mixed Revlon's Super 
Lustrous Lipstick in Island Pink with Waterproof Lip Shaper 
in Nudetones. Dress, Givenchy Haute Couture. Christian La- 
croix Haute Couture earrings. Paloma Picasso belt. Details, 
last pages. Hair, Maury Hopson for Louis Licari; makeup, 
Vincent Longo for Pipino-Buccheri. Fashion Editor: Andre 
Leon Talley. Photographer: Patrick Demarchelier. 



A relaxed approach to summer: a loosely constructed 
jacket in white. Collection by Ralph Lauren, page 234 



VOGUE .M .\ 1' 1990 




From the new collection, available in-store mid-]une. the long bronze iridescent silk taffeta wrap skirt, with the ribbed 
black rayon tank. In Bloomingdales NOW on Boulevard Four. New York. And in selected stores. Skirt also in peony. 











BEAUTY & HEALTH 

126 

Beauty clips 

By Shirley Lord 

129-152 
Images 

Green beauty: the new botany of skin 

care . . . Eyebrows are making a visibly strong 

comeback . . . Shirley Lord on fragrance and 

fashion . . . Hair answers . . . Beauty answers 

156 
Fitness 

Fitness tests measure strength, flexibility, 

endurance, and body composition. 

A. G. Britton checks them out 

176 

May Fragrance ... at stores across the country 

198 

Health 

Some women who face hazards at work are 

already being forced to choose: quit or be 

sterilized. David Kirp reports on the new 

fetal protection policies 

268 
All about Estee 

As her vast beauty empire heads into the 
nineties, Estee Lauder is still on top, still 
mixing perfumes. Julia Reed pays a visit 

272-279 
Essence: a love story 

A photo essay by Helmut Newton; an original 

story by Diane Lefer. 

Scent and sensibility: designer fragrances 

compete to seduce the woman of style 

300 
Cholesterol 

Despite the hype, cholesterol is not a code 

word for heart disease — especially for women. 

Mary Roach fmds out the facts 



FEATURES 

44,50 
Masthead 

58,62 
Contributors 

66 

Talking back: letters from readers 



165 

People are talking about. . . 

Courtroom drama . . . Elvis loves clean 
air. . .face value. . .more. By Julia Reed 

168 

Movies 

In two new movies, Jennifer Jason Leigh again 

plays a woman on the verge. David Edelstein 

finds out what makes Jenny B. Bad 

174 
Television 

Cathleen Schine admires John Thaw of PBS's 

Mystery! as a detective who can't stand 

the sight of blood 

180 
Books 

Quentin Crisp fmds Hanif Kureishi's first 
novel curious, funny, and insightful 

182 
Art 

French painting was nowhere more revered — 

or rapaciously consumed — than in Russia, 

reports Rosamond Bemier 










Artist Susan Rothenberg with her 

husband, Bruce Nauman, and the ledger 

she uses to record the status of her 

paintings, page 292 



192 
Noises off 

Geniuses ^ Us. By Tracy Young 

194 
Horoscope 

By Athena Starwoman 

206-216 
Travel 

A town called Zacatecas: Tad Friend discovers a 

secret city high in the mountains of Mexico. 

Travel News. By Richard Alleman 



218 
Food notes 

Monet's artful way with food. 
British dining 



. Greater 



221 
Living 

Madame de Pompadour sparked a romance 
with rococo and is doing so again today 

246 
The real Ivana 

Despite the relentless public scrutiny, few 

people know what Ivana Trump is really like. 

Here, an exclusive interview with Vicki Woods 

280 
Tofu guys don't eat meat 

Vicki Woods visits River Phoenix in Florida 
and shares a vegan omelet 

288 
Vogue fiction 

Best Western: a story by Louise Erdrich 

292 

New image 

The work of painter Susan Rothenberg is 

undergoing major changes and so is her life, 

Dodie Kazanjian discovers 






VOGUE MAY 1990 



, 





As debonair as 

the crowd. 

As distinguished as 

the settinj^ 

As poHshed as 

the trophy. 

That's the beauty 

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NIGHTS OF WHITE. FITTED, FLARING AND BOUND FOR 
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nnce upon a time 
in a faraway land, 
there lived a young man 
with a passion for quahty. 
He dedicated his life 
to designing clothes befitting 
men of power and prestige. 
These fashions, 
like the man himself, 
became known exclusively as . 
bijan. 






A 



.s his reputation spread 
throughout Europe, 
his fashions were sought 
by the most influential men. 
Using only the world's 
finest materials, bijan 
created a new line of clothes 
for every season . . . 



from the bijan silk de colle 







"eeking new horizons, 
bijan came to America 
where he established 
a fashion empire. 
Soon thereafter, 
bijan found true happiness. 
Her name was Tracy. 
They married on the 
first day of spring . . . 




I 



. nspired by love, 
bijan created two 
award-winning fragrances and 
a collection of jewelry. 
This was exceeded by 
the birth of their daughter, 
Alexandra. 

And so it came to pass 
that style ruled the land . . . 




A, 



.nd they ak live happily 
together in everlasting love . . . 



to be continued . 



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ANNA WINTOUR 

Editor in Chief 

Fashion Directors GRACE CODDINGTON, JENNY CAPITAIN Creative Director ANDRE LEON TALLEY 

Managing Editor PRISCILLA FLOOD 

Fashion Editor at Large CARLYNE CERF de DUDZEELE 

Art Director RAUL MARTINEZ Executive Fashion Editor PHYLLIS POSNICK 

Special Projects Editor. Fashion POLLY ALLEN MELLEN 

Fashion 

Fashion Director. Accessories/Shoes CANDY PRATTS PRICE 

Senior Editors GAIL PINCUS. ELIZABETH SALTZMAN 

Style Editor LAURIE SCHECHTER Fashion Feanires Editor LESLEY JANE NONKIN 

Booicings Editor PRESTON WESTENBURG Fashion Copy Editor PAGE HILL STARZINGER 

Fashion Associates SUSI BILLINGSLEY. JACQUELIN SPANIEL 

Assistants JONI COHEN, INGE FONTEYNE. ELIZABETH JONES. NATASCHA LOEB. TRACY SCANLON 

Fashion Copy Assistants KAREN BRESSLER. SALLY WADYKA 



Coordinator nONA DaRIN 



Paris Bureau Chief SUSAN TRAIN Paris Editor LYSSA HORN 

West Coast LISA LOVE 

Beauty and Health 

Beauty Director SHIRLEY LORD Health & Fitness Editor MARGARETTA NORTHROP 

Beauty Editor ELIZABETH COLLIER 

Health Associate PAMELA KAUFMAN Beauty Assistant ELIZABETH BROUS 

Features 

Senior Editors MICHAEL BOODRO. AMICIA DE MOUBRAY, RANDALL KORAL. NANCY NICHOLAS Senior Writer JULIA REED 

Editor at Large TRACY YOUNG Travel Editor RICHARD ALLEMAN 

Features Associates ANNE ALEXANDER. GISELLE BENATAR 

Bookings Editor MAGGIE BUCKLEY Travel Coordinator DESPINA MESSINESI 

Art 

Senior Designer NOEL CLARO Assistant Art Director SALVATORE KERNAGHAN 

Features Photo Editor ESIN ILI GOKNAR 

Design Associate EDMUND WINHELD Assistant LINA MAK 

Production Manager CHARLOTTE BARNARD 

Art Production Manager PAUL KRAMER Associate AMY VAN BERGEN 

Copy Production Chief MARJORIE HOLT Editors LAURIE DR^KE, DONNA PERKINSON Assistant LAURA WASHINGTON 

Research Editor PHYLLIS RIRELD Associate MARTHA PICKERILL 

Reader Information SHIRLEY CONNELL 

Editorial Administrative Assistants VIDA GHANI. REGINA MAGUIRE, MARIA MANOLAS 

Assistants to the Editor in Chief ORLA HEALY. SUZANNE BR ATONE 

Contributing Editors ANNE BASS, ROSAMOND BERNIER. JOAN JULIET BUCK. BART BULL, GRAYDON CARTER. ELEANORE PHILLIPS COLT, 

GABE DOPPELT, TAD FRIEND, CYNTHIA HEIMEL, GEORGINA HOWELL, DODIE KAZANJIAN, STEPHANIE MANSFIELD, 

ANNE McNALLY. PATRICIA DUFF MEDAVOY, WILLIAM NORWICH, JED PERL, JODY SHIELDS. JEFFREY STEINGARTEN. RACHEL URQUHART. VICKI WOOD^ 

Editorial Business Manager WILLIAM P. RAYNER Associate Business Manager LINDA RICE 

Editorial Advisor LEO LERMAN 
Associate Editorial Director ROCHELLE UDELL 



ALEXANDER LIBERMAN 

Editorial Director 



44 



V O G L' E MAI' 19 9 





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VERNE WESTERBERG I 

Publisher I 

BARBARA McKffiBIN Executive Editor NORMAN WATERMAN Associate Publisher I 

Advertising I 

Director NANCY LEWDMTER I 

Manager DIANE M. WICHARD Retail Director WENDY TALBOT I 

Beauty Manager DIANNE WALLACE Beauty Marketing Manager MIKE GREENBERGER I 

European Fashion and Shoes KAY CAVENER Furs and Fashion SUSAN SCHWARTZMAN I 

Health/ Fitness Manager LYNNE DOMINICK I 

Accessories and Home Furnishings Manager MARL\NNE BUCHANAN I 

Marketing Manager ANITA SAVITT J 

Travel and Beverage Manager SCOTT FORD 1 

Public Relations Director SUZANNE EAGLE I 

Merchandising I 

Director DIANE HARRELL I 

Project Director ELIZABETH GROVES Editor KELLY BEVAN Southwest Editor BEVERLY PURCElJ 

Coordinator KATHY-JEAN MARTIN Services SUSAN HODES OLEARY I 

Store Credits Editor DOLLY MORTON Associate DEBORAH MATTIS I 

Fashion Marketing Editor LAURINDA FINELLl Coordinator JULIE KELLY I 

Promotion I 

Director LYNDA GREENBLATT 1 

Art Director MARCL\ WEINBERG Associate Art Director MARC BENHAMOU I 

Copy Chief JANE GRENIER I 

Production Director DAML\N CARLINO Manager MARY SIR] I 

Branch Offices I 

Midwest JOHN KELLY, Manager, 875 No. Michigan Ave., Chicago IL 6061 1 I 

Detroit PEGGY DAITCH, Manager, 3250 West Big Beaver Road, Troy MI 48084 I 

West Coast JOHN P. DEMOREST. Manager, LIZ MILLER. Acct. Mgr., I 

9100 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills CA 90212 1 

CHRISTINE MATHEWS, Manager, 50 Francisco Street, San Francisco CA 94133 I 

New England ELMO ECKER, 350 Madison Ave., New York NY 10017 I 

Southeast MILLER & TILLMAN, Reps.. 4651 Roswell Rd., N.E., Suite 201-C, Atlanta GA 30342 I 

Southwest BEVERLY JAMESON, Metro Southwest, 3988 N. Central, Dallas TX 75204 I 

Florida & Caribbean DAVID RUBIN, DBR Associates, 454 Alamanda Drive, Hallandale FL 33009 I 

Canada MPR 3 Church St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5E 1M2 I 

Hong Kong HERB MOSKOWITZ, Seavex Ud., 503 WUson House, 19 Wyndham Street. Central, Hong Kong I 

Europe I 

GARDNER BELLANGER, Associate Publisher for Europe I 

284 Boulevard Saint-Germain, 75007 Paris I 

SYLVIE McKENZIE, Account Executive, United Kingdom, Spain, and France 19 S. Audley Street, London wri 

MARVA GRDTIN, Account Executive, Italy Viale Montello, 14, 20154 Milan I 

BRITISH VOGUE Vogue House, Hanover Square, London, WIR OAD I 

FRENCH VOGUE 4 Place du Palais-Bourbon, 75007 Paris I 

GERMAN VOGUE 44 Leopoldstrasse, 8000 Munchen 40 I 

ITALIAN VOGUE Piazza Castello 27, 20121 Milan I 

SPANISH VOGUE Serrano 3, 28001 Madrid I 

VOGUE AUSTRALIA is published by Bernard Leser Publications Pty. Ltd. I 

BRAZILL\N VOGUE is published by Carta Editorial Uda. I 

MEXICAN VOGUE is published by Carta Editorial de Mexico I 

VOGUE is published by The Conde Nast Publications Inc., . I 

Conde Nast Building. 350 Madison Avenue. New Yoric NY 10017 I 

Chainnan S.I. NEWHOUSE. JR. Deputy Chairman DANIEL SALEM President BERNARD H. LESEBl 

Executive Vice Presidents JOHN B. BRUNELLE. JOSEPH L. FUCHS I 

Vice President-Corporate Resources FRED C. THORMANN Vice President VERNE WESTERBERG I 

Vice President-Treasurer ERIC C. ANDERSON Vice President-Secretary PAMELA M. VAN ZANDtI 

Vice President Circulation PETER ARMOUR I 

Vice President Manufacturing and Distribution IRVING HERSCHBEIN I 

Vice President Conde Nast Package NEIL JACOBS I 

Corporate Marketing Director ECKART L. GUTHE I 



50 



VOGUE MAY 



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CHRISTIE BRINKLEY 

Christie is wearing Snapdragon. 



''A friend of mine says she 
has better luck in choosing 
her Ungerie than in choosing her 
dinner comf^anions. 

"Perhaps there's just a better 
selection of lingerie out there. " 



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Maidenform offers women over 1^0 ways to 
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SAKS FIFTH AVENUE • NEIMAN MARCUS • I. MAGNIN 




CONTRIBUTORS 

\0GIE 




hans f eurer 

"Africa exudes life," says Hans Feurer, who photographed the 
"Tropical Whites" story on Funzi Island, Kenya, for this issue and is 
pictured here with his catch ("a good-size Nile perch") at Lake Vic- 
toria. After attending art school in Zurich, then working as an art di- 
rector for magazines and ad agencies in Paris and London, Feurer 
"boughta Land Rover, shipped it to Africa, and spentl966 and 1967 
crisscrossing the continent. I loved it — making my fire every night, 
sleeping outdoors." Wanting to unite his passion for travel and ad- 
venture with his sense of beauty and color ("Life is color"), Feurer de- 
cided to pursue fashion photography and returned to Europe. 

Asa photographer, Feurer is a perfectionist. "I wantto know every- 
thing beforehand — models, clothes — so that I can imagine it and 
make sketches. I shoot almost as if I'm producing a film." But he adds, 
"I don't like manipulation. I want to catch the essence, not something 
forced." So, for Kenya, he decided to try "reportage, to record unex- 
pected moments as they happen, unprepared and unprovoked. I fol- 
lowed Christy [Turlington] around like a paparazzo." And the results? 
"Photos must be completely simple in the end: I have to look at them 
and say, 'Do I believe it?' They must smell of real life. I surprised myself; 
I look at these and they do." 

Living now on a farm in the Swiss mountains with his Danish wife 
Dot, who is a former model, and two sons, Feurer returns to Africa at 
every opportunity. "Fishing is another great love of mine, but really I 
think it is just an excuse to go back." contributors ► 62 



58 



VOGUE MAY 1990 



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CONTRIBUTORS 



RANDOM HOUSE S 




\oaE 



mary roach 

Mary Roach, 
who wrote 
about dancing 
for fitness in 
April, demystifies 
cholesterol in this 
issue. A contrib- 
uting editor for /n 
Health (formerly 
Hippocrates) 
magazine in San 
Francisco, Roach 
also writes hu- 
mor pieces for a 
variety of publi- 
cations. Using 
her ability to un- 
cover odd truths. 
Roach has inves- 
tigated the merits I 
of fresh versus frozen vegetables, the strange dreams of 
pregnant women, and the motivations of people who vol- 
unteer to catch a cold for science. When not making 
science palatable. Roach indulges her taste for travel, 
most recently to Turkey, Trinidad, and South America. 

cathleen schine 

Cathleen Schine be- 
gan writing about 
television for Vogue 
six years ago when 
her son was an infant 
and she didn't want 
to leave the house or 
him. The author of A/- 
ice in Bed, a novel 
The New York Times 
Book Review hailed 
OS "full of sparkle" 
and John Updike in 
The New Yorker 
called "sprightly," 
Schine follows Alice's 
adventures out of 
bed in her latest nov- 
el (published this 
April), To fhe Birdhouse. Schine, who is married to film crit- 
ic David Denby, admires John Thaw of PBS's Mystery! in 
this issue, but says, "My favorite show right now is the 
news. Democratic revolution — the series. TV has become 
completely, sublimely addictive." 




62 



VOGUE MAY 1990 



The Architects of Time 




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TALKING BACK: letters from readers 



Star quality 

To the Editors: 

What a breath of fresh air to open the 
pages of VOGUE and rediscover the 
Horoscope column. Since she began her 
column, Athena Starwoman has impressed 
me with her astrological insights and clear 
interpretations of the celestial influences 
affecting each sign. I also adore the 
"Myth," which highlights the background 
of each sign. These have thrown a new light 
on every sign I hove read thus for. 

In the recent profile of Athena Star- 
woman (Contributors, February), you men- 
tioned that part of her time is spent prepar- 
ing mail-order horoscopes. Where would I 
write for more information on this service? 
Patricia Wilson 
Ho-Ho-Kus, NJ 
Editor's note: 

For information on mail-order horo- 
scopes, you may write to Athena Star- 
woman, 14 East Sixty -fourth Street, Suite 
5A New York, NY 10021. 

Glass houses 

To the Editors: 

I note with some cynicism your column 
People Are Talking About. . . (by Julia 
Reed) in the February issue, which referred 
to "British Shame" — Margaret Thatcher's 
decision to send "tens of thousands" of 
Vietnamese boat people bock to the "most 
brutal communist regime in the worid." 

As a British citizen residing in Southern 
California, I am constantly mode aware of 
this country's own immigration policies at 
the Mexican/American border, over which 
tens of thousands of similaHy terrified and 
profoundly desperate Central and South 
Americans are deported back to the equal- 
ly brutal regimes oppressing their lives. 

The United States government wastes no 
time in sending these "illegals" back to their 
pitiful origins despite the greater resources 
available in this country compared with 
those of the United Kingdom, which is a 
fraction of the size of Southern California. 

May I suggest that critics of Margaret 
Thatcher tend to their own southern back- 
yard before stepping into that of their 
northern cousins. 

Sonja Vaughan 
Son Diego, CA 
Julia Reed responds: 

The plight of the illegal aliens crossing the 
Mexican/American border is indeed la- 
mentable, but their situation is hardly com- 
parable to the forcible repatriation of the 
Vietnamese boat people. The Mexican 
government is a democracy, not a brutal 
dictatorship, and its citizens are free to 
leave the country at any time. While those 
citizens who attempt to illegally enter the 
United States seek better economic condi- 
tions, they are not fleeing a violently op- 
pressive regime, and there have been no 
reports of retribution upon their return. Fi- 
nally, the policies — positrve or negative — 
of any other country do not alter the fact 
that what the British are doing in Hong 
Kong is disgraceful. 

66 



Kind words 

To the Editors: 

I just read the February issue of VOGUE 
and am smiling from ear to ear. The energy 
and excitement on your pages make me 
happy to be in the fashion retail business, 
and these days that is certainly saying a lot. 
My favorites are "Movers and Shakers" 
and "Ladies' Day," both styled by Cariyne 
Cerf de Dudzeele. Thank you for making 
myoll-timefavoritefashion magazine even 
better. 

Salvatore Ruggiero 

Vice President, Marshall Field's 

Chicago, IL 

Fur real? 

To the Editors: 

In his otherwise delightful interview 
(View: Bob Mackie, by Stephanie Mans- 
field, February), Bob Mackie appalled me 
with his reaction to seeing animal pelts be- 
jre they're sewn together to make fur 
coots, "it's very hard, let me tell you, when 
they bring in the skins with their little feet 
and heads attached and you see the 
ears . ..." If the sight of a pelt so distresses 
Mr. Mackie, why continue to make gar- 
ments out of them? 

I am thrilled to read, however, that 
Mackie will concentrate on what he does 
best: glitzy dresses for the go-go giri in all of 
us. Who needs furs when you con sparkle in 
bugle beads and sequins! 

Hollis Brooks 
New York, NY 

To the Editors: 

In the article "Natural Selection" 
(March), Carol Leggett mode a reference 
to designers' environmental concerns and 
how some are using fake fur. 

Fake fur is a burden to the natural envi- 
ronment. Fake fur is a synthetic (that is, 
man-made) product that is not biodegrad- 
able. To produce fibers for synthetic fur, the 
petrochemical industry mokes heavy use of 
petroleum by-products. The manufacturing 
of these products creates hazardous waste 
materials that add to the ever-growing 
problem of pollution and the depletion of 
the earth's ozone layer. Using furbeoring 
animals is a logical and natural process that 
does not pollute the environment. The 
world is a continuous ecosystem with a 
food chain in which humans ore at the top. 
Animal rights is not an environmental issue. 
Connally Baumann 
Denton, TX 

Pro photo 

To the Editors: 

Neil Kirk was only half right when he 
said, "Photography isn't art" (Contributors, 
March). To be more precise, his photogra- 
phy isn't art. It's fashion photojournalism, at 
best. But then, he already knows that. "A 
fine representation of what was in front of 
the camera at the moment the shutter was 
clicked": isn't that what they'll be saying in 
one hundred years? 



Hey Neil, Webster's dictionary defines 
ort OS "a systematic application of knov<^- 
edge or skill in effecting a desired result." 
And while we're on the subject of art, I'd be 
curious to know, given the choice, how 
many people would rather hove a rusty 
bathtub hanging on their wall than a Stei- 
chen or Horst photograph ("Shock of the 
Mundane," by Brooks Adams). The point is 
that art is different things to different peo- 
ple, and beauty is, as they soy, in the eye of 
the beholder: that's fine. Just don't tell me 
"photography isn't art." 

Kevin Morrill 
Boston, MA 

Forever brunette 

To the Editors: 

I read the article "Blonds" (by William 
Geist, February) and could not pass up an 
opportunity to respond. I grew up in the six- 
ties with commercial and print ods that stat- 
ed, "If I've only one life to live, let me live it 
OS a blond," "Gentlemen prefer blonds," 
and "Blonds hove more fun." Being of 100 
percent Italian descent, I felt cheated and 
insecure and literally wished I were some- 
one else (with blond hair). 

I can proudly soy that at "thirtysome- 
thing," I am still a brunette, married with 
two children, and still attracting attention 
from men! If a woman wonts to generate 
an aura of sex appeal, she has to be totally 
self-confident, learn to truly like herself, 
and project this image to the outside world. 
It has absolutely nothing to do with the col- 
or of the hair growing from her scalp. 

Angela Calamusa 
Fairfield, NJ 

To the Editors: 

The disgust I felt upon reading William 
Geist's article "Blonds" was only equaled 
by that which I felt upon finding it in your 
magazine. I think the reason this article 
most offended me is the transparency of 
the roots that lie beneath this author's ob- 
session. He, like many others, has difficulty 
seeing women as human beings and indi- 
viduals. Rather, he sees them as cookie cut- 
outs. A woman is either a sexpot or a 
librarian, either a blond or a brunette. Like 
many others, he believes his attraction to 
blonds is "primal," when in fact it is about as 
socially established a fancy as you can 
have — invalidating the beauty of block, 
oriental, and Hispanic women, to name just 
a few. The Barbie ideal. 

Shame on you, VOGUE and William 
Geist. My condolences to both his wife and 
your readership. 

India MacWeeney 
New York, NY 
Editor's note: 

William Geist declines to respond. 



VOGUE welcomes letters from its readers. 
Address all correspondence to Letters, 
VOGUE Magazine, 350 Madison Avenue, 
New York, NY 10017. Please include a 
daytime telephone number. Letters may be 
edited for length or clarity. 

VOGUE MAY 1990 



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B\SHION CLIPS 

By Page Hill Starzinger 

The best summer jackets 
The coolest way to beat the heat and 
look pulled together for the city: 
wearing airy trapeze jackets. The 
standouts are long — reaching two 
inches or so above the hemlines of 
short shorts and skirts. Michael 
Kors's show up in white cotton can- 
vas, Isaac Mizrahi's in colorful 
striped madras. 

What's new? Fifties glamour 

iNMiat is it about Grace 
Kelly that keeps de- 
Isigners coming back 
Ifor more? She's an 
"icon of style," ex- 
plains Marc Jacobs of 
Perry Ellis, while Isaac 
Mizrahi defines her 
appeal as "sexy in a 
sophisticated way." 
No matter. Both de- 
signers used Kelly- 
style accessories for 
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to sportswear. Even 
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; To Catch a Thief. 





Adding movie-star 
drama to ail- 
American plaid suits, 
ABOVE: scarves 
wrapped around 
the head, huge 
sunglasses. By Marc 
Jacobs for Perry Ellis. 
The inspiration, RIGHT: 
Grace Kelly in 
To Cotch o Thief. 
Details, last pages. 



Designers to watch 

Unlike other designers who've recently 
jumped on the ecology bandwagon, Gemma 
Kahng has always valued natural materials: 
"They're interesting and beautiful." Her bare 
white stretch dresses are ornamented with 
beads made from coconut shells. Her light- 
weight three-quarter coats are made from hop- 
sacking — with roughly fringed edges.... In a 
season of t>athing suits that are as elegantly de- 
signed as ball gowns, Brenda Welch's are 
some of the most ornamental: gold rope is 
sewn onto black bikinis, white pearls are 
scattered across white maillots, clear crys- 
tals dangle from shiny gold suits. 



76 




Loose, full pants or skirts may be the coolest Hems to 

wear in summer, but they can quickly look limp. The best 

pieces are cut in body-conscious ways or sharpened with 

hard graphic prints. Michael Kors, for example, 

"anchors" his pajama pants to the body by tapering 

them at the waist and hips. He also pairs them with 

small, skin-revealing tops (bras or cropped tanks). 

Those by Yamamoto, Chloe, and Kors look great. 



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Editor: Laurie Schechter 



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he short trench 

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81 



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Ralph Lauren has more than 
one hundred forty. Armani, one 
hundred thirt\^-seven. With 
designer boutiques again on 
the rise, jody shields looks back 

THERE WAS A TIME WHEN BOUTIQUES HAD SUCH STATUS THAT PRINCESSES 

and countesses worked as salesgirls. This was the Paris of the 1920s. 

when the boutique was still a very exclusive novelty. Couturiers were the 

first to set up these small shops, stocking them with 

their products, installing their names over the doors and 

their friends behind the counters. 

The boutique grew to power along with the couturi- 
ers. No longer content to create just dresses, designers 
put their names on a thousand elegant trifles, from um- 
brellas to tennis outfits. Selling everything under one 
roof was a way to present their vision intact and keep a 
grip on a client's wardrobe. While the celebrity status 
of the sales force has changed since the 1920s, ►M 

Designer boutiques, past and present: 1. Ralph Lauren 
sells pedigree in a Madison Avenue mansion. 2. Where 
fashion met culture: Paraphernalia in 1967. Here, Betsey 
Johnson and Twiggy. 3. One of the first boutiques: Elsa 
Schiaparelli's, c. 1935, had a birdcage entryway. 
4. Modern minimalism, from Romeo Gigli. 



84 



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VIEW; designer boutiques 




the boutique today remains true to its original concept. 

Though there's a question about just who gets credit 
for the very first Paris boutique, Elsa Schiaparelli 
opened herdoors in 1 928 at 4, rue de la Paix, a shabby, 
sixth-floor walk-up. Her next effort, in 1935 on the 
Place Vendome, boasted a fantastical decor that set a 
standard for all the boutiques to follow. The walls were 
draped with fishnet. Scarves, belts, and sweaters hung 
on ropes; other accessories were displayed on straw fig- 
ures. The furniture was black, the curtains were made 
of patent leather. The saleswomen, outfitted in school- 
girl uniforms, sat at school desks near the entrance. The 
radical window displays became tourist attractions. 
Jean Patou offered another kind of attraction in his bou- 
tique: he set up a cocktail bar. 

In New York City, the same species of store was called 
a specialty shop. By the 1 930s, the city was booming with 



shops operated by im- 
portant designers like 
Fortuny, Hattie Car- 
negie, and Valentina. 
While the majority 
were no match for 
Schiap's stylish witti- 
cisms, there were a 
few exceptions. John- 
Frederics, a millinery 
boutique, boasted two 
floor-to-ceiling 
"birdcages" that 
were private fitting 
rooms. Lily Dache, 

another millinery boutique, featured leopard-skin uphol- 
stery, fitting rooms in gold (for brunettes) or silver (for 
blonds), Chinese statuary, and a door knocker inlaid with 
semiprecious jewels . 

By the mid-1950s, the extravagant, elegant boutiques 
as well as the department stores no longer suited a youn- 
ger generation of shopper. In 1955, the venerable Berg- 
dorf Goodman shook itself awake and opened Miss 
Bergdorf, an in-store boutique aimed at the junior crowd. 
Something stronger, however, was brewing in London. 

A direct descendant of the Schiaparelli school of retail- 
ing, the Bazaar boutique was launched in 1955 by Mary 
Quant. It was stocked with avant-garde garb and had an 
atmosphere described as "part boutique, part cocktail 
party." Quant explained Bazaar's appeal; "Snobbery has 
gone out of style, and in our shops you will find duchesses 
jostling with typists for the same dresses. " 

The same manic josding was common at Biba, another 
landmark London boutique. Created by Barbara Hulan- 
icki, Biba featured mass changing rooms, earsplit- ► 92 



90 



VOGUE MAY 1990 



jman Marcus 







J > 



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A TANTALIZING NEW ASPECT OF THE MODERN 




See Ifour World 

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brings to clients in his decorating. 
Now he brings the same fresh 
ideas, keen observations, and 
professional advice to you in this 
wise, warm, extraordinary volume. 
In 37 essays he guides you through 
everything from "The Uses of 
Wallpaper" to "The Delights of 
Chinoiserie," from "Setting the 
Table" to "Learning from the 
English Country House." There 
are whole sections devoted to 
colors, individual elements such 
as curtains and fireplaces, styles, 
materials, even decorating out- 
doors. He has illuminated the text 
with over 100 of his exquisite 
watercolors and added his own 
wonderful handwritten notes. 

Mark Hampton On Decorating 
is one of the most personal books 
ever created by a great decorator, 
as well as informative, engaging, 
and inspiring. 

To reserve your copy in the 
special slipcased edition created 
exclusively for Conde Nast read- 
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or credit information for S29.95 
plus S3. 00 shipping for each 
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Box 10214, Des Moines, lA 50336. 
Or, for Credit card orders: 

CALL TOLL-FREE 

1-800-453-1400 

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IL residents please add applicable 
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VIEW; designer boutiques 




m^f' '^ 





Boutique styles have 

ranged from '60s 

psychedelia to 

futuristic chic. 1. In 

the London of the 

'60s, Granny Takes a 

Trip offered 

counterculture 

fashions. 2. Radical 

design, '80s-style, at 

Issey Miyake. 



ting Beatles music, and a 
dimly lit interior crowded 
with kitschy artifacts. In 
the early 1970s, Biba 
mushroomed into a kind 
of superboutique with 
black glass counters, 
couches, potted palms, 
and fringed lampshades; 
prune was the favored 
color for the merchan- 
dise, which included ev- 
erything from sheets to 
shirts. 

The 1960s was a boom time for boutiques in New York City. 
Boutique hot spots ranged from Greenwich Village to St. Mark's 
Place and along a few select streets on the Upper East Side. 
"Shopping" meant "hanging out." Paraphernalia attracted a 
crowd that ranged from jet-setters to Andy Warhol's clique. The 
Cheetah boutique, an extension of the Cheetah disco, was open 
from noon until four in the morning. 

When the market for custom-made clothes crashed in the mid- 
1960s, couturiers again went boutique-ing. Yves Saint Laurent 
launched his less expensive Rive Gauche ready-to-wear line. 
Located on the Left Bank, the Saint Laurent Rive Gauche bou- 
tique was, from carpeting to ceiling, all startling orange. Other 
designers, like Courreges, were quick to follow. Even Vogue 
magazine hit the streets with a column called Vogue ' s Own Bou- 
tique, featuring fashionables such as Baby Jane Holzer and 
Wendy Vanderbilt setting out on shopping sprees. 

More and more department stores began to recognize the bou- 
tique as salvation in a small package. Ripping off the intimate 
boutique experience, they repackaged it to fit into large-scale 
stores. Henri Bendel divided its main floor into a "street of 
shops." By the early 1970s, the entire second, third, and fourth 
floors of Bloomingdale's were divided into boutique-size areas. 
Today, designers from Azzedine Alaia to Adrienne Vittadini 
have taken the boutique into their own hands and returned it to its 
original role of a designer's working lab, the strongest way to 
present an image. There designers can also present the kind of 
personal service unavailable elsewhere. Geoffrey Beene's new 
Fifth Avenue shop, for example, offers custom and ready-to- 
wear clothing, plus an old-fashioned extra: purchases are deliv- 
ered in a black van with his name in script on the side — a service 
pioneered by Schiaparelli nearly sixty years ago. • VIEW ► lOO 



058 



92 



\' O G II E MAY 1990 




CHAN 





CHANEL BOUTIQUES: NEW YORK, BEVERLY HILLS, CHICAGO, 
SAN FRANCISCO, DALLAS, PALM BEACH, HONOLULU, WASHINGTON, D.C. 



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NO EXCESSIVE CHEMICALS 

If you're using an SPF higher than 15, you are putting 
excessive, potentially irritating chemicals on your skin. 
The fact is, when your sunblock is rubproof, sweatproof, 
and waterproof, it stays on your skin, so an SPF 15 is all 
you need for maximum protection. 

BROAD-SPECTRUM PROTECTION 

An SPF number measures protection only against the 
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VOGU E M AY 1 



PARFUMS 



PARIS 



FTH AVENUE 



AN MARCUS 




1. Randolph Duke's home is his castle. 

2. Designing swimsuits for Anne Cole 

taught Duke about the body. Here, 

leggings, striped top. 3. Pushing the limits 

of design: stirrup pants, a cardigan, a 

screaming yellow motorcycle jacket. 

4. Exercise-inspired sweatshirts and anoraks 

mix with suits. Details, last pages. 

100 




Randolph Duke 

is making a career 
out of thumbing his 
nose at the fashion 
establishment. 

STEPHANIE MANSFIELD 

finds out why 

WHEN A FASHION CRITIC ONCE DISMISSED A 
Randolph Duke show as "a yawn," the de- 
signer retaliated by having a package of No 
Doz wrapped in a gold box and delivered to 
the writer's office. 
Months later, another 
reviewer sniped that 
Duke's clothes were 
"tarty. ' ' He received a 
freshly baked lemon 
tart by messenger, 
compliments of the 
maligned designer. 

Scrappy, irreverent, 
and defmitely outside 
the mainstream, tow- 
headed and bestubbled 
Randolph Duke has 
the kind of beyond- 
the-fringe persona 
that comes from ► 106 



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VIEW: randolph duke 



growing up in Las Vegas with a 
show girl for a mother and the Liber- 
ace Museum as the most important 
cultural center. "Sometimes I used 
to really bite my tongue when people 
asked me where I was from," says 




Duke, working in his Manhattan 
showroom one afternoon. "It con- 
jures up so many stereotypes. They 
think you're bom on a crap table.'' ' 

While Duke's bad-boy image has 
grown, so has his reputation as a sol- 
id force among young American de- 
signers struggling for recognition. 
"He has a kind of snarly attitude," 
says one fashion insider. But Duke 
says certain stories about his rude- 
ness are exaggerated. For instance, 
he did not, as widely rumored, toss a 
glass of champagne in a reviewer's 
face at a crowded Manhattan fashion 
event. He laughs mischievously. "I 
didn't have the guts to do that. ' ' 

Not that he didn't fantasize about such a satisfying 
moment; not that he didn't flirt with such a confronta- 
tion. But after all, success is the best revenge, and here 
he is with a hot new line, a boutique at Macy's in New 
York City ("The clothes are fun, young, and sexy," 

106 




1. Duke's take on "the Waspy, preppy thing" — plaid pantsuit, matching 
trench. 2. Duke's worktable: "I'm not calling fashion designing on art form. 
We're in this business to make, manufacture, and sell clothes." 3. Details 
count: a jacket is stitched with navy to match the mock turtleneck, skirt 
beneath. 4. In a playful mood — Duke's plaid romper. Details, lost pages. 

says Bruce Binder, vice president and fashion direc- 
tor), new financial partners, and the magazines breath- 
lessly schlepping back and forth to his showroom with 
bags of samples to photograph. People have even 
stopped calling him Duke Randolph. ►116 

VOGUE MAY 1990 



,< 



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BEAUTIFUL SKIN TOMORROW 




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LET IT MOVE YOU LIKE NO FRAGRANCE EVER HAS 



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m ^^X j^^ The stunning new fragrance for women from Mikhail Baryshnikov. 
^kff^^^ 'To order call toll-free 1-800-842-9501. 



Marshall Field's • Dayton-Hudson • Lazarus • And other fine stores 




'WHAT NOVOCAINE IS 

ID DENTISTRY, 

MY NEW 

CATALOG IS ID 

shopping: 



Candice Bergen 



CANDICE BERGEN'S TOP 40 SUMMER HITS. 







I.FKnceakt). 



Painless shopping? No problem. With my new catalog and the Spiegel Fall Collection you can choose from 



hundreds of summer essentials in the comfort of your home. With no android-like sales clerics or annoying 



sensor tags to ruin your day. Just the thou^t of it kind of makes you numb, doesn't it? To receive Candke's Catalog 



and the Spi^l Fall Catalog for just $5, simply call 1-800-345-4500 and ask for Catalog 715. 

I'OGUE MAY 1990 




115 




enter picasso's 
bedroom... 

Chagall's garden. Bonnard's 
bath, for the most intimate, 
revealing look ever offered into 
the lives of the great European 
artists of this century, in their 
own private, seldom-seen worlds, 
both at work and at play 
Alexander Liberman, himself 
a renowned painter and sculptor, 
\isited modem masters from 
Giacometti. Dali and Dufy 
to Rouault. Braque and Matisse, 
engaging them in candid 
conversations as well as photo- 
graphing their environments. 
And the book that resulted has 
established itself as a contempo- 
rary classic on art and the act of 
creation. This newly revised and 
expanded edition runs 304 pages. 
9" X 12;' with 138 illustrations 
in full color and 73 duotones. 

The Artist in His Studio usuallv 
sells for $60.00. As a Conde Nast 
Reader, you can have it for 20% 
less: $48.00 plus $3.50 shipping 
for each copy. 

for credit card orders 

call toll-free 
1-800-367-7400 

or send check to Conde Nast 
Collection, Dept. 420083. PO. 
Box 10214, Des Moines, lA 50336 

Residents of NY CA, CO, GA, IL. lA, KT Ml MA pleose 
odd soles tox. Pleose otlow 4-6 weeks for oelivery. 



VIEW: randolph duke 



And to think, the guy was designing bathing suits a few years 
ago! Notjust any bathing suits. Bathing suits with chain mail and 
seat-belt buckles, bathing suits that seemed to be missing crucial 
pieces of fabric. Bathing suits cut down to here and up to there 
and never mind that nobody got wet in these contraptions. (Duke 
doesn't even swim.) You want to do laps? Buy a Speedo. Duke 
on the Zen of swimwear seduction: "It's got to have every- 
thing in it but the kitchen sink. It's got to make you look like a 

million dollars. That's the one 
you're gonna sink your hus- 
band in, right?" 

From bathing suits, Duke 
learned about Lycra and lean, 
clean shapes. He also learned 
about women. He knows from 
bodies. "Swimwear is the most 
serious thing you can design! 
Women don't take swimwear 
halfheartedly. They're scared to 
death of bathing suits. They go 
into a dressing room in the mid- 
dle of January with white thighs 
and they haven't exercised. 
They roll down their panty hose 
and they hike up their dresses 
and they get afraid ! It ' s not , " he 
says, shaking his head, "a very 
pleasant thing for most women 
to buy a bathing suit. I hear 
these horror stories of women 
going in for three hours." But 
Duke got bored with bathing 
suits. "It wasn't enough," he 
says wearily. "It was flat. One- 
dimensional. I said, 'I can't do 
this for the rest of my life ! ' " 

Like any self-respecting art- 
ist, Duke searched for a new 
outlet and found it in sports- 
wear. Motorcycle jackets, western-style smoking jackets 
with saddle stitching in slot-machine-fruit colors, cocoon 
shapes, cat suits, fringed coats, and gold lame golf shirts 
dubbed Sammy Davis, Jr. , Golf. (He even sent a model down 
the runway carrying a gold spray-painted golf bag.) "This 
whole collection pokes fun at the Waspy, preppy thing. I 
thought we'd take Waspy and do it Sammy Davis, Jr. , instead 
of rea/ golf like Ralph Lauren shows." 

At thirty-two, Duke is just brash enough to criticize the fash- 
ion hierarchy while at the same time yearning to be part of it. 
Some of the establishment, he says, "has gotten old. The press 
last season said unanimously, 'This is getting boring,' and the 
designers know it ... . People are groping for excitement, and 
yet on the other hand they're not tolerant of real newness. If it's 
too new, if it's too weird, if it's too off the wall, it's not good. 
The magazines are wonderful, the fantasies are wonderful, the 
shows are wonderful, but in the end, if you can't sell a piece of 
clothing, you're nowhere." 

Women who wear Duke's designs take risks. They ap- ►118 




Not-so-basic basics: cot suit, 
jacket, and trench. 



116 



VOGUE M A ^ 1990 




Haven't we all had enougji of fighting our way up packed escalators and trying to communicate with android- 



like sales clerks? With my new catalog and the Spiegel Fall Catalog you can choose fi-om hundreds of great items 



in the comfort of your home. To be mauled or not to be mauled? That is the question. To receive Candice's Catalog 



andtheSpiegel Fall Catalog for just $5, simply call 1-800-345-4500 and ask for Catalog 718. 

OGIE MAY 1990 




117 



VIEW: randolph duke 



' 



predate the details — the fringe, the sad- 
dle stitching, the fit, and the colors — 
and they like to be noticed. In a sea of 
tailored Armanis and clean Calvins, 
Duke's slightly rebellious vision is en- 
tirely his own. "I didn't apprentice with 
a big-name designer," he says. "I 
didn ' t play the game . ' ' 

Bom in Las Vegas to a seventeen- 
year-old dancer, Randolph Duke didn't 
exactly grow up in Norman Rockwell 
land. His mother danced at one of the 
casinos and left her son every night to 
go to work. "I was alone. That's when I 
developed my creative skills, I guess." 
He began sketching with charcoals and 
pencil, and some were even good 
enough to sell to performers at the casi- 
nos. A visit to his Greenwich Village 
apartment, done in muted vegetable 
tones with a slightly menacing medi- 
eval motif (the bed is a bizarre version 
of a four-poster; the footboard boasts 
half a dozen erect metal spears), reveals 
Duke's passion for details and his love 
of drawing. On the table are many 



sketchbooks filled with designs. In the 
comer is his grand piano. 

Over dinner in a favorite neighbor- 
hood bistro, Duke muses on his child- 
hood. "I realized I had repressed some 
problems in my life, about being alone. 
I was left alone, and I always thought 
that was a normal thing until I realized 
that people didn't leave five-year-olds' 
alone, normally." He still harbors a 
fear of the dark and prefers company to 
solitude. As an adolescent, his insecuri- 
ty manifested itself in a physical flam- 
boyance. "I wore purple corduroy bell- 
bottoms, platform shoes, and daisy- 
print shirts. I wanted to be a ballet 
dancer, but my mother wouldn't let me 
take lessons . " He smiles , taking a sip of 
mineral water. "She thought I'd turn 
out weird or something. ' ' 

This need for attention prompted 
Duke to join his mother on stage in the 
chorus ("behind fifty rows of feath- 
ers"), and he got hooked on applause. 
"Even now, " says his PR and sales di- 
rector, Sandy Graham, "he designs to 






cotton 



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NEIMAN MARCUS • BErfBoRF 




walk down that mnway. " He also took 
up piano, taught by his grandfather. Af 
ter high school he spent one year at the 
University of Nevada, then transferred 
to Los Angeles's Fashion Institute of 
Design and Merchandising. After a 
short stint in Portland, Oregon, design- 
ing for Jantzen, he was hired by Cole of 

"I know designers have 

a bad reputation. I 

hear who's difficult 

to work for. I wouldn't 

take offense if 
somebody said I was 
difficult to work for" 

Califomia. Duke calls designer Anne 
Cole "a mentor and an inspiration of 
mine. We talk daily. I call her Mommie 
Dearest. She really adopted me as the 
son she never had." 

Restless and rapaciously ambitious, 
Duke left Cole and came to New York 
in 1984 to design for Gottex. (He re- 
cently rejoined Cole and is designing 
her new collection.) He also opened a 
storefront on the Upper West Side, 
which has since closed. "I put him 
down when he does the wrong thing," 
says Cole, laughing. "But he's gone 
through hell, going to New York un- 
known and unsponsored. Finally, I 
think he's gotten his act together. 

One former assistant recalls the time 
a model in Cleveland was about to walk 
out on the runway and Duke berated 
her, saying, " 'You look awful.' He 
would make these scenes. It was in- 
sane. Basically, I think he was unhap- 
py." His relationship with the press 
was strained. "I think he was trying to 
show them he didn't care. " 

' ' I know designers have a bad reputa- 
tion," Duke explains. "I hear the way 
designers talk about other designers. I 
hear who's difficult to work for. I 
wouldn't take offense if somebody said 
1 was difficult to work for. ' ' He pauses, 
rubbing his stubbled chin and gazing off 
into the distance. "I might be flattered, 
actually." • 



118 



VOC, V E M A V I 9 9(1 



TIRED OF 

TRYING TO FIGURE OUT 

WHICH IS THE 

SALES CLERK 

AND WHICH IS THE 

MANNEQUIN: 

Candice Bergen 



ill! 
I 




Candice bergenstop40 Summer hits. 




Here's your choice. You can keep playing the sales clerk/ mannequin guessing game or you can use my new 



catalog and the Spiegel FaU Catalog and pick from a plethora of great items in the comfort of your own home. 



It's your decision. By the way, the mannequin is the one that dresses better. To receive Candice's Catalog and the 



Spiegel Fall Catalog for just $5, simply call 1-800-345-4500 and ask for Catalog 719. 

O G r E MAY 1990 




119 



Clizabetn lay lor s 

1 assion 

For 1 ke Doay 

Ana k^oul. 

boiiUmcle. beremilly. 

A semsuoiiis 

Ibodly ciintdl odltin riltiuial 

suirroiuiinioiiinitf you 

vriih passiomi. 

^oolllniinrf tine oodly. 

^ilkemim^ itlnie skiini. 

rreeniotf tne soul 

tto its mnost 

be ami to mi imnia^iiiniiiia^s. 




ELI ZABETH TAYLOR'S 

R^ION 

Neiman Marcus 



121 



ELEMENTS 

Editor: Candy Pratts Price 





"There's something beautiful 

about a hat that makes a 

woman feel feminine," says Eric 

Javits. 1. Yves Saint Laurent's 

trails a chiffon scarf. 

Accented with a velvet band. 

By Christian Lacroix Haute 

Couture. 3. In textured straw, 

by Philippe Model. 4. With a 

metallic sheen, by Eric Javits. 

5. For making entrances, by 

Christian Lacroix Haute 

Couture. 6. Far from the 

man-tailored fedora. By 

Ralph Lauren Hats. 7. In a 

soft pastel shade, by David 

Salvatore for Head Master. 

Details, last pages 



The ultimate 
extension of 
designers' new 
feminine messagt 
the hat-in 
uncommonly soft 
pretty shades of 
pink and green, 
with bows and 
scarves 






/du^fj^ii^ /fwji^ 





^fyyiAomce oT' ene/vY c^^^^^ 



Ill 




AT GITANO STOI 





BEAUTY CLIPS 

Bv Shirle\- Lord 



Instead of spritzing behind the ears, 
try Aveda's new refillable 

aromatherapy earrings, left. As you 
move, they emit the fragrance of 
calming or invigorating essential 
oils... or the scent of your choice. 




Round-the-clock 
beauty 

Beauty room service is an 
idea that's taken off at 
New York City's Plaza 
Hotel, where a recent ad- 
dition is the all-in-one 
Pierre Michel Coiffure/ 
Lancome Institut de 
Beaute. Open on Sun- 
days (11:00 A.M.-5:00 
P.M.) with long hours dur- 
ing the week (8:30 A.M.- 
8:00 P.M.), this hair and 
beauty combo also offers 
services around the clock 
when given twenty-four 
hours' notice. 

Another trend: hotel 
gyms that offer the "spa experience" — facials, massage, herbal 
wraps — to follow workouts. Manhattan's Peninsula Hotel now has these 
services for guests. 

Health Fitness Dynamics is a new kind of company that specializes in 
the planning, designing, and managing of spa facilities anywhere. Re- 
sponsible for the Top Notch Spa in Stowe, Vermont, and the Dora! Sa- 
tumia International Spa Resort 
in Miami, co-owner Patty Mon- 
teson says, "Ski resorts and de- 
partment stores are now 
looking at the importance of 
day spa facilities." 

Nordstrom's started the full- 
spa-in-store idea. Now there's 
a Catherine Atzen day spa at 
Henri Bendel, New York. Berg- 
dorf Goodman will soon unveil 
its own idea of beauty-in-store. 
A full-service Lancome Institut is 
in Bloomingdale's, and shop- 
ping by video has begun at Saks 
Fifth Avenue's expanded beauty 
salon in its new tower on East 
Fiftieth Street. 

126 



The smartest spot under the sun 

Since the FDA informed the public of the many dang 
sunbathing, lotions and creams with SPFs climbing ir 
high double digits have been staples in beach bags. 

However, high SPFs haven't always delivered tht 
shield they promised, because swimming, uneven ap 
tion, and general activity make coverage less than /?< 
Now there's a whistle-blowing new product called Sun 
(waterproof, size of a dime) that alerts you to impending 
ger. Sun Spots stick on skin, tennis rackets, and towels 
out yellow and gradually turn red when it's time for < 
sunscreen application — or you hit the shade. Sun Spot: 
Kid-Spots) have a patent pending, may be affixed to ba 
suit labels soon, and will also be sold at cosmetics cow 

Foolproof nail color 

No drips, no smudges, no errors, no dried-out brushes 
wasted enamel — that's the boast of Quintessence's N< 
vage Nail Enamel. In an easy-to-handle, penlike, push-b 
ton applicator with brush tip, Nouvage could revolutioni 
manicures — especially home manicures. One push and ( 
comes the right amount of polish onto the brush. 



Versatile trend 

There's a fringe, bang, "frieze" for 

every woman, says Jean-Marc 

Maniatis, the trendsetting Paris 

hairdresser who cut the three models' 

bangs here. NEAR right, heavy bangs 

just past brows modernize long hair, 

while softer, wispier bangs soften the 

other two short short haircuts. Bangs 

are, in fact, showing up everywhere — 

on the runway at the Christian Lacroix 

couture show, where Alexandre 

matched short, full bangs with high, 

small chignons; at Chanel, 

where flirtatious bangs peeped from 

extra-wide-brimmed hats. 




'or every woman 
#10 doesrit 

vant to be just 
my woman. 




We understand that every woman 
is unique. That your haircoloring 
needs are different from others 
and change over time. For those 
reasons we have created the most 
extraordinary range of haircoloring 
products in the world. All designed 
to allow you to express your 
individuality simply, easily and 
confidently. Clairol." Because 
you're not just any woman. 



7 



mi-^4^; 




A"M 



Jf w 




ist any color. 




Gall for some 
cobrM talk 
and all the 



rkht answers 




1-800-Glairol 



Ifs not just any number. 1-800-252-4765. 

To color or not to color? 

H you re like most women, you've thought about coloring your 
hair. Now there's someone to talk to. When it's time to talk 
color, it's time to call Clairol. Our staff of specially trained 
haircolor consultants will review your haircoloring wants and 
needs. They'll help you find not just any haircolor, but the 
perfect product and shade to complement your natural 
coloring and make the most of your hair. 

So if you're thinking about coloring your hair or have 
questions about the haircolor you're using, we suggest you 
get some expert haircolor advice. 

No appointment is necessary. Just call 1-800-Clairol anytime 
between 8:30am and 8:30pm EST, Monday through Friday, 
Saturday 9am to 6pm EST, for a personal consultation. 
Our staff is always eager to talk. 



Haircoloring explained in black and white. 

First of all, it's important to understand that there art 
basic categories of haircoloring products: temporary, 
permanent, permanent and highlighting (see above ri| 
These different types of color let you achieve different 
with your hair. 

Temporary colors are perfect for first-time users whe 
want to try out a color. They wash in and wash out easi 
there's no long-term commitment. 

Semi-permanent colors allow the natural shades of y 
hair to shine through. With no peroxide and no ammc 
you get gentle gray coverage. Color gradually washes o 
four to six shampoos, leaving no "roots." 



S«ini-P«niKinent Coloring 



Permanent Coloring 



ling 




CkAor Q«- 'outfi' 



Color 



The eosy; convenient 
way to cover gray 
without changing your 
natural cokx. 





Leaves hair feeling 
silky and looking 
lustrous with long- 
lasting coloc 



^MISS 
ClAIROL 





The ultimate rich gel 
colourant. Provides 
exquisite, guess-proof 
results. 

clajresse 



i*-' 




«osh-out, 


This no-peroxide, no- 


This shampoo-in 


Ammonia-free shampoo- 


genie shodes 


ammonia color enhances 


formula provides long- 


in color thaf s formulated 


outHul color 


body, shine and natural 


lasting color with 


to pamper permed, body- 


lodyi 


color while covering gray, 


expert gray coverage. 


waved and delicate haic 







For permed or natural hair, 
brush-on highlights for subtle, 
natural-looking reflections. 
Brightens the way you look. 




A beautiful woy to bring out 
natural highlights. Special 
conditioners will leave hair shiny 
and heahhy-looking. 



:hting products let you add highlights to selected 
of your hair. Depending on which product you 
th«'se highlights can be subtle or dramatic. Strands 
liflhtened until they grow out. 

^ind of Clairol" haircolor is right for you? 

(you color, there are a few important things you shoidd 
(bout. What do you want to do with your hair? Do you 
I cover gray, add highUghts, rejuvenate your dulhng 
color, or change your color completely? 

low long do you want the color to last? Do you want the 
) fade away gradually, last only a day, or remain in 
iir until it grows out? Your answers to these questions 
termine what kind of Clairol is right for you. 

here is the color itself. Pick one that complements your 
^xion, your skin tone and eye color. If you are trying 
lor for the first time, Clairol experts recommend that 



you choose a color close to your own, or a few shades lighter. 
The result of your haircoloring will be affected by both the 
shade you choose and your own natural shade. 

The right haircolor can take you from "dull" to dazzling in 
minutes. So don't waste another second. Choose the Clairol 
color that's right for you and discover not just any you, but a 
beautiful new you. 

If s not just any reason to try. 

As if all this weren't reason enough to color with Clairol, we're 
giving you one more incentive. 

From now until September 30, 1990, we will send you a $1 .00 
cash refund, by mail, when you purchase any participating 
Clairol haircoloring product. 

Don't delay. Look for details wherever you shop for Clairol 
haircolor products. 



know more about 



I to know more 



Tell us why you're not just any woman. 
You could win not just any prizes. 

To enter, simply tell us, in 200 words or less, why you're 
"Not Just Any Woman." Each entry must be received no 
later than October 13, 1990. You'll be judged on creativity, 
originality, credibility, and, of course, style. The winner 
will be chosen by a distinguished panel of judges and 
notified by mail. 

And the prizes? You guessed it. They're not just any prizes. 

If s not just any trip to the store. 

The Grand Prize winner will 

be awarded a $20,000 all 

expense paid, bi-coastal 

shopping trip to fashionable 

Fifth Avenue in New York and cliic Rodeo Drive in 

Los Angeles. Airfare and hotel included. 




If s not just any rock. 

Two first prize winners will receive 
"Not Just Any Rock. " This gem of a 
prize truly is a woman's best friend: 
a flawless one Carat diamond nng. h.si«i.m)»mn,rfn>h,.,>ir». 



Ifs not just any designer label. 

Ten second prize winners will 
receive "Not Just Any Wardrobe." 
We're talking the height of fashion: 
an ensemble from Anne Klein II— 
one of America's hottest designers. 

Ifs not just any fragrance. 

Two hundred third prize winners 
will receive Joy de Jean Patou, one 
of today's most luxurious perfumes. 





/ 




\ 



/" 



'Not Just Any Woman'' Contest Official Rules 

: Hond print or type an essoy of 200 words or less describing why you, o relative or a friend are 
■mon. Include with your essoy, your name and oddress, along witli on actual UPC bar code 
ly of the Clairol brands participating in this contest. They ore: Nice 'n Eosy ^ Ultress"', Miss 
ipoo Formula, Miss Clairol * Creme Formula, Loving Care* Color Lotion, Loving Core* Color 
& Tip«, Light Effects* Quiet Touch* Hoirpointing, A Touch of Sun* Cloiresse* Balsom Color"*, 
orn Blonde* Toner/Lightener, Summer Blonde"*, A Lot/A Little Sun* Silk & Silver* ond Instant 
orory Color Rinse. For Instant Beauty * remove the small sticker, containing the pink Clairol * 
J on the top of the bock label and trace the UPC bar code located on the bottom of the bock label, 
'reproduced UPC bar codes will not be honored and those essays received with mechonicol 
1 will not be |udged Moil to: Ooirot *Not Just Any Womon* Contest, P.O. Box (2324, Jt. Paul, 
L Enter as often as you wish, but each entry must include separate proofs-of-purchose ond be 
ptely via first class moil. All additional entries must meet the requirements outlined in rule #T 

I be received by October 13, 1990. Neitherthe sponsor nor any of its agencies are responsible for 
lOged, misdirected, incomplete, illegible or postage due moil. All entries become the exclusive 
ioirol and none will be returned. 4. The contest is open to women who are U.S. residents and ore 
irs of age. S. Employees of Clairol, any of its affiliate companies, agents, advertising agencies, 
fuppliers, Corlson Soles Promotion Company and their immediate families ore not eligible to 

iis contest. All opplicoble federal, stote ond local lows apply. Contest void in Arizono and 
Id where prohibited by law. 6. By claiming a prize, winners agree that oil prizes are oworded 
jilion Ihot Clairol, Carlson Sales Promotion Company, ond their respective agencies or 

II have no liability whatsoever for any injuries, losses or damages of any kind coused by any prize 
om acceptance, possession or use of any prize 7. Entries will be judged on the basis of oeotivity 
It), beftevobility (20%), ond originality (20%). Essoys entered lor pteviovs competitions will be 
udjpng will be condvcted by a panel of quolif ied eipefts under the supenision of Corison Soles 
npony, on independent judging orgoniiotion whose decisions ore final, t. Winners will be notified 
Druory 16, 199) and moy be obligated to sign and return an affidavit of eligibility and liability and 
3ses within 14 days of notification. In the event of non-compliance with this requirement, prizes will 
the alternole winners. Prizes returned to Clairol or Carlson Soles Promotion Company as 

; will be awarded to alternate winners. All prizes will be awarded. However, please allow 
ly 3 months for the prizes to be oworded. 9. Acceptance of a prize shall constitute and signify the 
•ement and consent that Clairol may use the winner's name, address, likeness and/or prize 
nthout limitation, for promotional purposes including advertising, publicity and point-of-sale 
!r consideration or payment. 10. Prizes: (1) Grand: A seven consecutive day shopping spree trip 
h New York City, New York, and Los Angeles, California. Includes round trip airfare from major 
lirport nearest winner's home to Los Angeles, on to New York, and then o return flight home. Also 
loccommodations for five to seven nights and ground transportation Prize also includes $10,000 
imole retail volue: $20,000; (2) First: One Carat Diamond Ring. Approximate retoil value: $10,000/ 
:ond: Designer Outfit from Anne Klein II. Approximote retail value: $2,(KX)/each, (200) Third: Joy 
J. Approximate retail value: $275/each; Total approximate retail value of all prizes: $115,000 
ill prizes ore solely the responsibility of the winner. Prizes ore not transferable. Only one prize per 
oddress. No prize or cosh substitutes allowed. Trovel must be completed by December 31, 1991 
estrictions may apply 12. For a list of nraior priie winners, send o seH-oddressed, stamped business 
b« March 31, mi to Clairol Winner's List, P.O. Boi 12326, St. Paul, MN SS1S2. Proof of purchase re<)uired. 




Win Glairol's "Not Just 
Any Woman" contest with 
a few well-chosen words. 



Please etiter me in Clairol s "Not Just Any Woman" contest. Enclosed you'll find my 
200 word essay. 



NAME (Please print or type) 


ADDRESS 


APT NO. 


CITY 


STATE 


ZIP CODE 

iMiislbrinrludrdi 



CLAIROL HAIRCOLOR BRAND PURCHASED. 

IS THIS THE FIRST TIME YOU'VE PURCHASED 
HAIRCOLOR? DYES DNO 



I I 



voc 



©199«(:laircillnr. 



Glairol 

Because you're 
not just 
any woman. 



Q 



A 



Q 

A 



I intend to color my hair and get a permanent 
Which should I do first, and is there any amo| 
time I should wait before doing the other? 

Have a permanent first. Wait a week before C(| 
and shampoo your hair at least once during tl| 
time. Do a strand test for exact timing. 

I've always wanted to hghten my hair a few sh. 
but I'm afraid it will harm my hair. Will it? 

Properly used, Clairol haircolor will not harn 
hair. It's formulated to pamper any type of ha 
add body And all Clairol haircolors have buil 
conditioners to give your hair a healthy, shiny! 



If you have any further questions or need assistant 
call the Clairol experts at: 1-800-252-4765. 




Sweat. But swea 



^ ^^ 



ay even one short game and you put your body through countless 
sts. You run hard, stop on a dime, turn, twist, and do it again 
)u need a shoe that keeps you at peak performance, every 
ueiing second. Like Kaepa cross court shoes. f . 

Performance starts with a \ \\y<:^ V 

custom fit. With the unique 

Action Hinge"" split 

vamp, Kaepa shoes 

are actually divided 

halves. 



Our unique Lace Locks'" then 
tyou adjust the two halves sepa- 
itely. Adjust the front half then 
lift the lace into the 
"lock "position. Now 
S^^ you can adjust the 
T^ •-. back without altering 
thefront. 






^^ 




Kaepa cross court shoes come with built-in comfort. The collar 
is made of soft polyurethane. The linings are cool and breathable. 




J 



The two halves can move indepen- 
mtly flexing naturally with your foot. 

That means no pinching. 
And fewer stress points. The 
p outsole is a combination 
ofEndura™ Rubber and 
Super Endura'" Rubber 
Together, they deliver 
superior traction, 
support and 
durability. 




Kaepa 's exclusive 

teral Motion 
'tabilizer'" creates 
extra side-to-side 

stability without restricting your heel area. This 
helps you prevent ankle injury, and keeps you feeling 
less fatigued so you can play longer. And stronger 



Kaepa cross court shoes are also available 
in a cross trainer style. You 'II get the same 
smart features in a shoe that looks at 
home on the court or in the gym. 





•990 Kaepa, Inc 



nordstrom 



SELECTED STORES 



^ Kaepa 



The ladies' Kaepa Cross Court sho 

is available at the following 

Nordstrom locations: 



IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 


IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 


HiUsdaleMall 


South Coast Plaza 


Stanford 


BreaMall 


Oakridge Mall 


Los Cerritos Center 


Valley Fair 


Montclair Plaza 


San Francisco Centre 


MainPlace/Santa Ana 




Glendale Galleria 




Topanga Plaza 




The Galleria at South Bay 




Westside Pavilion 




Fashion Valley 




University Towne Centre 




Horton Plaza 




North County Fair 






Body and Bath 




rolina Herrera 



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Saks Fifth Avenue 




Carolina 
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perfumed bath 
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FASHIONS BV LA LINGERIE 







IMAGES 

Editor: Shirley Lord 



^'^ Green beauty: more and more 
companies are relying on plants 
for skin care, shirley lord reports 



EACH MONTH THE NUMBER OF ENVIRONMENT-CONSCIOUS CUSTOMERS 
grows, and purveyors of all things natural for the face and body (and 
increasingly hair too) become the focus of new attention. European and 
American companies alike are using more and more botanicals in beauty prod- 
ucts to produce creams, lotions, and potions redolent of just-picked peaches, 
grapefruits, or rosy apples, silk-smooth with ingredients such as sweet almond 
oil, oil of orchid, jojoba, or aloe jelly. 

If the natural beauty-product movement is beginning to flower globally, it's 
very much a sign of the times. 

"The environment is going to be the most significant issue of the ► 130 

129 



IMAGESl natural products 




-i^.A 



nineties," said John Pike, president of network 
TV, Paramount Pictures, in a recent Adweek 
interview about Paramount's new environmen- 
tally based series. The Elite, which features a 
privately funded team of experts combat- 
^ ing crimes against the environment. In 
Hollywood, the Environmental Media As- 
sociation has been formed to serve as an in- 
formation source for the entertainment and 
advertising industries. Earlier this year the 
Woolworth Corporation announced a new corpo- 
rate position: director of environmental management, ' 'to 
coordinate Woolworth 's environmental education pro- 
grams and activities, including stores' responses to recy- 
chng and other environmental issues." Two of England's 
major natural beauty chains. The Body Shop and The Se- 
cret Garden, have recently brought their products to the 
United States. The Body Shop plans to expand here in the 
early nineties. The Secret Garden products are available 
exclusively through Amanda Fielding shops. 

It's all good news for the pioneers of the "green" 
beauty movement, especially in this country, where the 
seeds have been slow to bud. Just over a decade ago Horst 
Rechelbacher founded The Aveda Institute for Beauty, 
Fashion, Wellness, and Art in Minnesota to train students 
in aromatherapy, the treatment of skin through the appli- 
cation of natural plant oils and essences. It was consid- 
ered esoteric, if not eccentric, then. Today the institute 
trains about a thousand students a year, and Aveda has its 
own successful line of products made from organically 
grown materials, including its own perfumes (called 
"purefumes"). The first Aveda Aromatherapy Esthet- 
ique boutique opened recently in New York City, and 
more are planned for other areas this year. In February 
Aveda purchased a respected Philadelphia research lab to 
study skin cells, olfactory responses, and healing. 

Rechelbacher says, "From the beginning we wanted 
to set a precedent to harmonize social concerns with aes- 
thetic ones. Since the eighteenth century, crude animal 
and plant extracts have been used for fragrance, beauty, 
and medicinal purposes: quinine from the bark of a tree, 
morphine from the poppy flower. As organic chemistry 
developed, along came the synthetics, alcohols, alde- 
hydes, all kinds of chemical composites. Now there 
seems to be a desire to move away from chemicals and the 
artificial, to return to natural products. ' ' 

Many major companies are obviously well aware of 
this. Avon is using botanical extracts in its new Aroma 
Spa line for the body; Borghese's Terme di Montecatini, 
Stendhal, Prescriptives, Lancome, and Christian Dior all 
have plant-based treatment products. 

Clarins and Sisley, two respected French skin-care 
companies, have always used only botanicals in their 
products, and demand for them has steadily grown on this 
side of the Atlantic. Both companies' research facilities 
constantly reexamine and investigate the pros and cons of 
familiar plant extracts (aloe, chamomile) as well as unfa- 
miliar (condurango, rhatany. harpagophytum). 

130 



There have been triumphs — for instance, discovering 
how to isolate and then extract toxic elements from other- 
wise beneficial plants. Toxic amicine is removed from 
the high-mountain plant arnica before its useful properties 
are employed safely and effectively as stimulants in prod- 
ucts (like Sisley's Creme Detente, Clarins's Energizing 
Emulsion for tired legs, and Firming Shower Bath 
Concentrate). 

This month Clarins introduces a plant-based sun block 
with an SPF of 25 that absorbs up to 39 percent of the 
sun's rays (UVB, UVA, and infrared). From Sisley 
comes its first botanical makeup: treatment eye shadows 
as well as eye and lip pjencils, containing marigold ex- 
tracts to heal and protect. Next month sees the arrival here 
of Sisley's first sun-protection product. Super Sun Cream 
for the Face. It's the fulfillment of a longtime company 
research goal — to isolate the natural filter in karite butter, 
which in the sun cream is amplified by the addition of ex- 
tracts as varied as aloe, cucumber, and horsetail. 

' 'Modem technology has allowed us to isolate and then 
extract harmful allergens, often found in the stems of oth- 
erwise very useful plants," says Dominique Diot, Sis- 
ley's head of research and production, who holds a 
doctorate in chemistry and is affiliated with the Faculty of 
Medicine of Besangon in France. "We've been able to 
establish which plants have photoreceptors to absorb the 
sun's energy, like the sunflower, and which plants can 
make a definite contribution, like the vegetable hormone 
in hops, to specialized products for aging skin. ' ' (Sisley's 
Botanical Night Complex contains hops, along with 
horsetail and rosemary.) 

"Plants are like laboratories in the ground, cranking 
out materials," says Alvin B. Segelman, associate pro- 
fessor of pharmacognosy (the study of natural drugs) at 
the College of Pharmacy, Rutgers University. ' 'There are 
over five hundred thousand species of plants that we be- 
lieve can now, with the help of modem methods, be of 
enormous benefit to medicine and to beauty too. More 
than 40 percent of all prescription dmgs in this country 
have their origin in the plant world, and in many cases we 
are finding the naturally occurring dmg is better than the 
synthesized one. There is no reason to suppose 
that wouldn't be tme for beauty ^ 
products too. 

"You have to realize that in 
one plant there may' 
be ten thousand sub- 
stances of which only 
one may be useful. 
Now that we have the 
ability to isolate that one, I_ 
do believe we may* 
well be entering a 
golden age of natural 
products . " • IMAGES ► 1 32 

The sunflower, top, and hops, 

RIGHT, just two of the thousands 

of plants now being used for beauty 






Lotion 
roniqu< 

sans alcoo 
(grasses, por 



Toning 
Lotiop 

without alco, 
bination or oily 



Ipemaquillant 

"velours" 

gentiane 

fxaux grasses, pores dilaiii 

Cleansing Milk 

with gentian 
combination or oily skin 



3 MINUTES TO 
HEALTHY SKIN 

CLARINS Natural 
Beauty Prescriptum 



Take advantage of your natural ally. 
Put nature to work for you . . . Nurture 
skin's healthy appearance with CLARINS 
plant-based beauty treatments — to 
gently cleanse, tone and moisturize. 
Formulated with time-proven botanicals 
selected for their specific actions 
including skin-softening aloe, soothing 
licorice, pore-tightening gentian and 
nourishing hazelnut. 

Start each day with CLARINS 
3-minute beauty prescription. First, 
gently cleanse and lift surface impurities 
with Cleansing Milk with plant extracts. 
Next, apply alcohol-free Toning Lotion 
to refresh skin, tighten pores. The final 
step provides the specialized moisturizing 
care of Multi- Active Jour. Its time 
release, climate control benefits provide 
day-long care. 

Let this 3-minute beauty prescription 
bring visible health and radiance to your 
skin day after day. From ^^ 

the Specialist in Skin Care. ^BFT 
CLARINS, naturally. ^^^^^ 



PARIS 



n r d 5 1 r D m 



SELECTED STORES 



IMAGES 




Dark brows, light hair on Elaine Irwin 



Eyebrows, often darkened, made shapely, and 
definitely visible, are making a strong comeback. 
Here, a look at how brows have changed 



NOT SINCE THE FIFTIES HAVE BROWS BEEN SO EVIDENT. 
Dramatic, often darkened (no matter what the hair col- 
or), and arched, the latest brow is reminiscent of the era 
when stars like Ava Gardner proved that brows were 
meant to be noticed. Her dark, quizzically angled 
brows started a fashion that other stars — Audrey Hep- 
bum and Elizabeth Taylor among them — continued. 

Then brows were thick, dark, and defined with pen- 
cils to make precise, sharply angled shapes. Because 
women often didn't wear eye shadow or eyeliner, the 

132 



brow came on strong, generally balanced by a fire en- 
gine-red mouth. 

In the sixties, new brush-on brow powders gave 
brows a softer, more lush look. When false eyelashes 
became popular, for both top and bottom lashes, brows 
lost their importance and were plucked to a pencil-thin 
line or even bleached into insignificance. 

Brows started making a comeback in the eighties, 
when Brooke Shields made it clear she liked hers thick 
and wild. Now, the unwieldy big brows of the ► 136 

V O G II E M A ^■ 19 9 




i^lllMi' '■ 



CLARINS 

PARIS 

Gel Concentre 

Multi-Minceur 
Anti-Capiton 

Amincissant 

Raffermissant 

Tenseur 

Stabilisant 

Concentrated 

"Cellulite" 
Control Gel 

lonhats spongy appearance 




IMPROVE YOUR 
REAR VIEW 

New—Serious 
''Cellulite" Control 



Slim down, firm up. Start now to 
improve contours and minimize the 
appearance of sponginess. Add 
CLARINS NEW "Cellulite" Control Gel 
to your body beauty efforts and quickly 
see the difference. . .Just in time 
for Summer. 

Its multi-actions (slimming, firming, 
tightening, stablilizing) help visibly 
refine the appearance of "fatty" areas, 
commonly referred to as "cellulite". 
Formulated with specialized tone- 
tightening botanicals to effectively 
combat sponginess on hips, thighs 
and derriere. 

Day after day, results become more 
visible, more encouraging. With regular 
use, skin appears noticeably smoother, 
"cellulite-free" in just weeks. 

"Cellulite" Control Gel, from the 
Specialist in Skin Care. CLARINS, 
naturally. 



PARIS 



I.MAGNIN 

1-800-227-1125 



V 



ALMAY 
PURIFIES THE SUN. 

FINALLY SUNCARE AS PURE AS IT IS EFFECTIVE. 

This isn't just sun protection, it's skincare, too. All help prevent skin dehydration and signs 

There are oil-free and moisturizing sun protectors of aging caused by overexposure to the sun. 

for specific skin needs. Sun protection for lips and And Almay Suncare is PABA free and alcohol 

eyes, and an after sun skin soother, too. free so even the highest SPFs are gentle. 




FRAGRANCE FREE 

SUNCAR 



/?!>. 



SPF30+ 

Waterproof 
Sunblocl 










'Or, 'S 









Non-acnegenic. 
Hypo-allergenic. 
Fragrance free. 




K^.o/// 






? Iff 




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U N C A R E I 
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Oil Free Spray 

--«»mla 




ALMAY 

HYPO-ALLERGENIC 

PERHAPS THE MOST CARED FOR SKIN IN THE WORLD. 




The women 
who inveoted 
chic teH ah 



For the first time ever, the best-dressed, 
sexiest women in the world reveal their 
secrets of French Chic. All you need to 
know about building a unique ward- 
robe ...the hairstyle, makeup and per- 
fume right for you ...the colors and 
combinations that say the most . . . how 
to dress rich even if you're not. Dis- 
cover the fashion type that fits your life 
and projects your inner self-image 
(Aristocrat, Femme Fatale, NeoClassic, 
JetSet Sophisticate, Continental Preppy 
or Trendy) and use the specific pro- 
gram to define and enhance your look. 
Give yourself that Parisian flair of 
sensual self-confidence— give yourself 
FRENCH CHIC! Today! 



Author Susan Sommers is an international 

fashion journalist and stylist. 

French Chic is hardbound, with 224 pages, 

104 photos and 20 illustrations. 



FOR CREDIT CARD ORDERS 

Call Toll-free 1-80U-4S3-7300 

Or to order, send check or money order 
for $15.00* (a 20% discount off the 
original price of $18.95) plus $2 postage 
and handling to: 

CONDE NAST COLLECTION 

Dept. 350041, P.O. Box 10214 

Des Moines. lA 50336 

•Residents of CA, CO. GA. lA. IL, KY. MA. Ml. NY. please add 
appropriate sales tax. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery 



IMAGES: eyebrows 



eighties have 
evolved into the 
styHzed brows of the 
nineties, sometimes 
exaggerated but 
never messy. "The 
cleaner, shaped, 
even manicured 




Brow style, 

ClOCKWISE FROM 
FAR LEFT: Cindy 
Crawford, 
Revlon's "face 
of the nineties"; 
Christy 
Turlington 
displaying the 
well-behaved 
arch; dark and 
angled for 
Elizabeth Taylor. 




eyebrow balances the 
face , ' ' says makeup artist 
Francois Nars, who 
shaped the brows seen on 
page 132. Nars likes dark 
brows, particularly when 
haircolor is light. "Mari- 
lyn Monroe was one of 
the first to have platinum blond hair and dark eyebrows," he says. 

Cindy Crawford, the Revlon girl for the nineties, has eye- 
brows that are strong and stylized. Prominent, well-behaved 
brows are also turning up on other famous faces, from model 
Christy Turlington to Madonna to Isabelle Adjani. Another big 
indication of the new importance of brows is the expanding crop 
of products, such as Visage Beaute's Special Effects Brow Con- 
trol, Maybelline's Brow & Lash Groomer, Estee Lauder's Sig- 
nature Automatic Pencil for Brows, Gale Hayman's Automatic 
Brow Definer, Intelligent Skincare's Eyebrow Definer with 
Brush, and, on counters in July, Charles of the Ritz Brow Style. 

When shaping brows, overtweezing should be avoided. 
Makeup artist David Starr, a self-described "eyebrow archi- 
tect' ' from San Francisco, suggests stepping back about two feet 
from the mirror to check eyebrow shape, length, and thickness. 
"Standing too close to the mirror can distort your sense of eye- 
brow proportion," he states. Starr sometimes fills in underen- 
dowed brows with individual hairs, gluing each one in place. 

Hair and makeup artist Grey Zisser uses powder rather than 
pencils to shape brows. "Wax-based pencils tend to glob," he 
says. ' 'Powder gives brows a more natural look. ' ' 

Although brows are meant to be noticed now, some brows 
need to go on a diet. Waxing, done by a good facialist, may work 
better than tweezing, since it lasts longer. 

With naturally sparse brows, there's frequently a temptation 
to brush hairs straight up. Not a good idea. Says Tyen, artistic 
director for Christian Dior, "It's too artificial and can make you 
look as if you've seen something terrifying." Instead, apply 
matte powder or pencil with tiny strokes and finish the look by 
brushing brows in the same direction hair grows. • IMAGES ► 146 



136 



VOGUE MW 1990 




F 



Br" 



GiDRGio Beverly Hi 

Giorgio Beverly Hills, New York. 



yHicl^ 



i 



THE BEAUTY OF 



PAUL MITCHELL 



NOBODY ELSE CARES FOR THEIR HAIR 

QUITE THE WAY YOU DO. AND 

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IT'S A SYSTEM THOUSANDS OF 
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GUARANTEED ONLY WHEN SOLD 8Y A PROFESSIONAL HAIRSTYLIST 

C1990JOHNPAUL MITCHELL SYSTEMS PO BOX 10597. BEVERLY HILLS CA 90213-3697 



The Science of Beautiful Eyes 



Now you 
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with confidence to color so believable the 
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MYSTIQUE 



Mystique is a registered trademark of CooperVision. '" The Science of Beautiful Eyes is a trademark of CooperVision. 



Sebastian^ 





LAAf/mres: 

me 8/f//ve OF me r/Mes. 




WlljSrta 



/t's S^stc/na LAM/AMTeS'An ounce o(f conccntmtcd s/u'nc that's 
the ke^ to thchai> o(f the 90k Two d/^ops o([ LAM/AMTes pot/shes h4U> 
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L 



142 



VOG 1 E M .^ V 1 ?l 




'9 
>1f 



I m 




I 




>f 



A love affair that never end^ 



OPEN HERE TO 
EXPERIENCE OLEG 
CASSINI S ELEGANTLY 
PERVASIVE NEW 
SCENT. 





'Ul 



^ 



"This fragrance is my effort to synthesize all that the most 
beautiful women in my long career did for me. It is a 
tribute to their beauty and their charm" 




The American Tobacco Co. 1990. 




\' I 



SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Quitting Smoking 
Now Greatly Reduces Serious Risks to Your Health. 



Not available in some areas. 

9 mg. "lar", O.B mg. nicotine av. per cigareiie by FTC method. 



HE COMES FROM 

A BROKEN 

HOME. 




Every day 140,000 acres of tropical forest 
are axed, burned, or clear cut. The result: 
this margay — and thousands of other 
species that call these forests home — are 
teetering on the brink of extinction. 
Tropical forests help regulate the 
Earth's climate. And they shelter % of all 
Earth's species — unique life forms that 
give us priceless medical, industrial, and 
agricultural benefits. 



The Nature Conservancy works 
creatively w^ith partners throughout Latin 
America to safeguard tropical habitats. 
But we need your help, so join us. Write 
The Nature Conservancy, Latin America 
Program, Box CD0031, 1815 N. Lynn 
Street, Arlington, VA 22209. Or call 
1-800-628-6860. 

It's a question of proper housekeeping 
in the only home we've got. 



Nature. 
(^onservancy 



Conservation Through Private Action 




r^ 



# 



'/ 



# 











V«M 



yon Sarong 



IMAGES 



fashion and f i 




'Am^ fllv VB^'. 






Talking fragrdifce' 
and the hot tip 
is "florental" Igrl 
soounoK OeUri^,^ 
last pages. 






^^ ^ 



ance 



Like jewels, like accessories, like 
clothes, fragrance is becoming part 
of fashion. Shirley Lord reports 




lion Ti 




Once it wasn't realistic to write 
about fragrance as one report- 
ed on fashion. New bouquets 
didn't capture the olfactory 
sense with one particular mes- 
sage in the way a new silhouette 
delivered a strong visual predic- 
tion for the season. Now it's 
changing, and there are 
noticeable trends in 
composition as well as 
in packaging and pre- 
sentation. This will be the 
-^ summer of the "florental," 
or floral oriental, in which 
the exotic is mixed with the 
simple to produce scents 
of a subtle but distinctly 
recognizable and long- 
lasting caliber; the new 
Scaasi is a perfect ex- 
ample. Perfumers be- 



y 



U' 



Notable trends: the container 
as objet d'art (Vicky Tiel, 
leopard-topped Beverly Hills, 
and Navy), plus fashion- 
inspired fragrances from top 
designers ( CLOCKWISE FROM 
TOP: Oscar de la Renta, 
Ralph Lauren, Yves Saint 
Laurent). Details, last pages. 

VOG I' R MAY 1990 



lieve their character reflects the strong 
"back to nature" trend, a deliberate move 
away from what are perceived as aggres- 
sive "synthetic" perfumes. This is news — 
which can feasibly be reported — in 
the way a new skirt length 
is news, however dif- 
ferently designers in- 
terpret it. 

Fresh citrus and 
orange flower 
with rose de moi 
and coriander 
are part of the 
feminine bouquet 
of Cover Girl's first fragrance, Navy; its 
purse spray is a good-looking accessory 
for any purse and illustrates another big 
fragrance trend — the emergence of the 
container as on object in its own right, 
empty or full. Other examples are Gale 
Hayman's new fragrance, Beverly Hills, 
with its reclining leopard top. La Prairie's 
first fragrance. One Perfect Rose, with its 
porcelain-rose lid, Vicky Tiel with 
its sculptured-woman stop- 
per, and Bijan's Perfume 
for Women in its stun- 
ning, shapely bottle. 
Ralph Lauren's new 
and alluring Safari 
also brings together the fa- 
miliar (jonquil and hyacinth) 
with the unusual (mountain 
narcissus, genet, and orris) in 
silver-capped bottles that are 
meant to be kept. Safari's 
elegant purse spray is re- 
fillable — another grow- 
ing trend. 

There ore, of course, 
variations on the florental 
theme for the new 
men's scents: Fred . 
Hayman's 273 for 
Men has on herbal 
base with woody 
notes; Eliza- 
beth Taylor's 
Passion for 
Men is spicy, 
woody, and 
floral; Tiffany 
for Men adds 
spice to citrus. Synthet- 
ic ingredients that mimic 
natural ones are likely to be 




«. 




part of the new formu- 
las for both sexes, but 
everywhere the im- 
portance of naturol 
notes is paramount. 
It hasn't been that 
way for a long, long 
time. 

Modern perfumery 
really began in the 
late nineteenth centu- 
ry, when perfumer 
Jean-Francois Houbigant 
used a synthetic ingredient 
for the first time. (Houbi- 
gant is still making news with 
its uniquely appealing fra- 
grances today.) Then, perfum 
ers began to experiment with ^ 
chemicals in test tubes, and the 
marriage between nature and 
science created different, 
haunting fragrances. 

There was something risque 
yet romantic about the "mod 
^ern" perfumes — as these hy- 
brids were called — and 
the greatest of them be- 
came classics: Guerlain's 
L'HeureBleue (1912), Mit- 
souko (1921), and Shalimar 
;i925),Coty's Emeraude 
(1 923), Chanel No. 5 (1 924), and 
Nina Ricci's L'Air du Temps 
(1948) are ail stil! best-sellers. 

It wasn't until the late sixties that 
^American women began to buy 
^fragrance in earnest, and in only 
two decades many new scents 
have become classics them- 
selves. Estee Lauder's Youth 
Dew was the first, followed by 
memorable sense-stoppers 
like Revlon's Charlie, Giorgio, 
Christian Dior's Poison, Gi- 
venchy's Ysatis, Oscar de 
la Renta, Yves 
Saint Lau- 
rent's Paris 
and Opium, 
and Calvin 
Klein's Ob- 
session and 
Eternity. Destined 
to join the select group: 
Guerlain's Samsara, already a 
big success. IMAGES ^ 150 



J; 



k 







HlA^ 



In Black And White. 



There's something in a 
sensational smile. One that 
dazzles and disarms and 
dares to be noticed. And it 
starts with bright, white, 
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kind you can get with 
EpiSmile™ 

IT'S NOT WHAT 
YOU THINK. 

EpiSmile is not a tooth- 
paste, but a cosmetic 
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removes stains and dull- 
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without using harsh abra- 
sives or detergents. It's 
perfect for natural as well 
as bonded teeth. And 
since it's formulated with 
cavity-fighting fluoride 
you can use it in place of 
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a day. 

THE SECRET 
IN THE SMILE. 

The key to EpiSmile is 
its special whitening 
agent, CalProx™ 
which dissolves the 
protein pellicle, or 
buildup, on your 
teeth. It's this pellicle 



that attracts stains and 
plaque. By removing the 
buildup your teeth will 
return to their natural 
whiteness. Even your 
breath will stay fresh 
longer. 

EVERYTHING 
YOU CAN TRUST 
Since EpiSmile is not a 
bleach, it won't artificially 
color your teeth. And it's 
non-abrasive. Formulated 
by a dentist seven years 



^ 



.^^SiniGi 




ago, EpiSmile is so mild 
it won't penetrate tooth 
enamel or the softer sur- 
faces of bonded teeth. 
TESTS AND 
MORE TESTS. 
EpiSmile was the subject 
of extensive clinical and 
laboratory testing. The 
results consistently showed 
that EpiSmile is completely 
safe for all teeth and gums. 
And, more impressively, 
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ing stains and dullness 
from teeth. 

A DIFFERENCE 
YOU CAN MEASURE. 
For all these facts, 
though, there's nothing like 
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why EpiSmile comes with a 
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that actually lets you mea- 
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In only three weeks you'll 
be able to see a measurable 
difference. And if that 
doesn't make you smile, 
what will? 



eP 



E P I S M I L E™ 

For The Whiteness You Can Measure. 



Available at the cosmetic counter of tine department stores. For more information, call 1-800-444-5347. 



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IMAGES: hair answers 

In an age of environmental 
awarenessr, many companies 
are taking an all-natural 

approach to hair care 



NATURAL INGREDIENTS ARE MAKING A COMEBACK IN HAIR 
care, and one reason, experts believe, is because many women 
prefer to use a shampoo or conditioner containing ingredients 
they can recognize (floral/herbal extracts, egg. or vinegar) rather 
than multisyllabic chemical ingredients they can't pronounce, 
much less identify. 

Thirty years ago. French hairstylist Rene Furterer began ex- 
perimenting with some of his grandmother's plant and egg hair- 
care concoctions. Today, his homemade recipes have evolved 
into a sophisticated line of products that includes shampoos with 
egg (as an emulsifier) and extracts of orange, cypress, thyme, 
and rosemary, thought to have special antiseptic properties that 
cleanse the pores of the scalp. 

"In Europe, many women have a long tradition of using 
plants and herbs on hair and skin. My mother used to rinse my 
hair with chamomile and water to add shine." says Jean-Rene 
Gougelet, president of the U.S. division of the French pharma- 
ceutical giant Pierre Fabre, makers of Rene Furterer products. 

Today, natural ingredients come from many sources: the sea 
(J. F. Lazartigue's Marine Shampoo with natural green clay to 
absorb excess scalp oil; Zotos's Bain de Terre Conditioning 
Kelp Masque for normal/dry hair), plants (L'anza's Biotane 
Shampoo, which relies on jojoba oil for moisturizing proper- 
ties), fruit (grapefruit shampoos for oily hair, like Amitee's 
"Goijpe Out" Build-Up Removing Shampoo; Coconut Oil 
Shampoo and Banana Conditioner at The Body Shop; Crabtree 
& Evelyn's Apricot Kernel Oil Shampoo for dry hair), and floral 
extracts (Kiehl's Chamomile Shampoo for Blonde Hair; Rev- 
Ion's Scandinavian Highlighting and Brightening Botanical For- 
mula with chamomile, birch leaf, and marigold). 

Safety is another big issue. For any woman who has reacted 
negatively to chemicals used in hair color or who simply doesn't 
want to commit to a permanent color change, many colorists 
now tint hair temporarily with ingredients that can easily be 
found in the kitchen. In his hookSetFree — The Book About Hair 
(Simon and Schuster), Richard Stein, who owns the Richard 
Stein Salon in New York City, provides recipes for hair-color 
rinses that can be whipped up at home. There's the blackstrap- 
molasses-and-coffee-grounds rinse for dull brown hair; a mix of 
raspberries and strawberries to highlight red hair; crushed black- 
berries for blue-black hair; and the tried-and-true lemon-juice 
rinse to brighten/lighten blond hair. He also suggests combining 
these kinds of ingredients with diluted apple cider vinegar to add 
extra shine, or with plain yogurt to bind the coloring agents to- 
gether for easy application. 

"None of these rinses is meant to last through more than a few 
shampoos." says Stein. "But for a fast, easy way to enrich color 
they work fine and provide conditioning benefits without using 
any chemicals." — LAURA FLYNN McCarthy images ►is? 



150 



voc; I I-: M .\ V i 990 



IMAGES: beauty answers 



when it comes to skin-care products and makeup with 
sunscreen, can there be too much of a good thing? 
Here, the latest facts, pros and cons, from the experts 



NOW THAT WOMEN ARE BEGINNING TO 
use cosmetics with sunscreens on a dai- 
ly basis , is there a danger of skin receiv- 
ing a "sunscreen overdose?" Many 
dermatologists say no, because the 
chemical concentration of sunscreen in 
makeup and daily moisturizers is usual- 
ly low (sun protection factor 4 or 6) , and 
the chance of skin irritation decreases 
along with SPF levels. 

For the most part, in fact, dermatolo- 
gists agree that putting sunscreen in 
makeup has been a positive step toward 
protecting skin against sun damage. 
There is one other risk: some sunscreen 
products can aggravate acne. But more 
often this is due to the base product — 
for instance, a heavy moisturizer that 
clogs pores — rather than the sunscreen 



chemicals themselves. (Max Factor's 
new alcohol-free Invisible Face Protec- 
tor, SPF 12, is designed not to clog 
pores; Biotherm's BioClimat Weather- 
proof Face Tint has an SPF of 8 . ) 

So far no well-controlled studies are 
being carried out to determine whether 
or not sunscreens produce side effects 
after long-term daily use. It's not sur- 
prising. Sun-protection products — sun- 
screens and blocks — haven't been 
around that long, so they have no track 
record. In fact, the Food and Drug Ad- 
ministration began reviewing sun- 
screen ingredients only in the mid- 
seventies, when it came to the 
conclusion that the ingredients could 
not only prevent sunburn but protect 
against some skin cancers and the pre- 






mature aging caused by the sun's ultra- 
violet rays. As the FDA notes, it's only 
in the past decade or so that there has 
been a proliferation of sunscreen and 
sun-care products. 

Madhu A. Pathak, Ph.D., senior as- 
sociate professor of dermatology at 
Harvard University, says, "It is possi- 
ble that after long-term use of sun- 
screens we will see more acquired 
sensitization reactions, but we don't an- 
ticipate any systemic effects." 

A current problem for those sensitive 
to certain chemicals is that sun products 
are often reformulated without chang- 
ing their names. "Keep reading la- 
bels," Pathak cautions. Those sensitive 
to PABA, for instance, will often find 
that it has been replaced in many formu- 
lations by cinnamates and benzophe- 
nones, which are less irritating. 

Not all sunscreens protect against all 
sun rays. Some protect only against 
UVB rays, which cause burning and 
reddening, while others protect against 
UVA rays, which penetrate into the der- 
mis, or base layer of the skin, and are re- 
sponsible for premature aging — weak- 
ening the skin structure by diminishing 
its production of elastin and collagen. 

So far, there is no SPF rating for 
UVA protection, although one compa- 
ny, Schering-Plough, uses an index 
called APP for its Shade line. APP 
stands for "a protection percentage" 
and reflects what percentage of UVA 
rays the sunscreen in question blocks. 
Look for the ingredients benzophe- 
none, oxybenzone. methoxybenzone of 
sulfisobenzone, or Parsol 1789, a new 
chemical that blocks UVA rays. 

When you head to the beach, don't 
rely only on sunscreens in makeup. 
Makeup, even with sunscreen, doesn't 
adequately protect skin during pro- 
longed sun exposure unless it has an 
SPF of at least 15, cautions Marianne 
N. O'Donoghue, an associate profes- 
sor of dermatology at Rush-Presby- 
terian-St. Luke's Medical Center in 
Chicago. — ELIZABETH COLLIER 

152 







n r ri 5 1 r D m 



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me to Marlboro Country. 



■'i^r'. 



© Phjhp Moms Inc 1990 



FITNESS 



Finding out how fit you are means measuring 
strength, flexibility, endurance, and body 
composition, a. g. britton reports on fitness testing 



THE NEWS WASN'T GOOD. MIKE MOTTA. CHIEF TRAINER 
and co-owner of Plus One Fitness Clinic, was holding a 
computer printout displaying the results of my fitness 
evaluation and shaking his head. "Haven't seen this 
many problems in a long time . ' ' Written on the printout 
were nasty-sounding things like "shoulder dislocation/ 
subluxation," "patellofemoral problems," and "pro- 
tracted shoulders." 

Now, I've always thought of myself as fit. After all, I 
take aerobic dance classes four days a week, run three 
to five miles two other days, and stretch regularly. But 
I'd always wondered exactly how fit I was — and 
whether I was neglecting anything in my workouts. 
That's why 1 was having a fitness test at Plus One (and it 
seemed I had work to do). Ultimately, I signed up for 
tests at three New York City workout spots. 

Fitness testing is fairly new, so there are no absolute 
standards to follow . You may be examined by a team of 
trainers and a physical therapist for two hours, as at 
Plus One, or run through a forty-minute stationary bike 
and weight-lifting course by a gym employee. And not 
every gym has the same definition of fit. Your perfor- 
mance may be measured against that of other members 
of your health club (which may mean fifty people) or 
against the YMCA's norm tables, based on tests of 
twenty-two thousand men and women. 

The most useful tests evaluate all three of the basic 
components of fitness — strength, flexibility, and aero- 
bic capacity — and give you some idea of whether 
you're carrying too much fat in relation to lean muscle. 
However that information is obtained, it can help you 
get more out of your workouts. Here's what I learned. 

Plus One Fitness Clinic 

Plus One is a sports medicine clinic offering physical 
therapy and medical exams along with one-on-one ex- 
ercise training. As a result, its $275 fitness test is state 
of the art. "An accurate fitness test is tough to adminis- 
ter," says Motta. "Most clubs don't have the software 
and equipment needed or the luxury of an on-staff 
physical therapist." 

My test began with a medical questionnaire. More 
than just a checklist for broken bones and childhood ail- 
ments, it asked whether I ate toast or cereal for break- 
fast, three meals a day or two, whether I'd ever dieted 
successfully. Next, I dressed in workout duds to meet 
resident physical therapist Scott Teagarden. He tested 
my limb strength against his own resistance, had me 
fold up in every conceivable direction to gauge my joint 
flexibility, and checked my posture and alignment. 
Then from top to toe, as if he knew bodies the way an 



auto mechanic knows cars, he told me what was bro- 
ken, what needed a tune-up, and what was in good run- 
ning order. 

I learned why my left knee sometimes made crunch- 
ing sounds in exercise class (the "patellofemoral prob- 
lems" that later showed up on the computer printout). 
The ligaments that keep my kneecap in place were lax, 
Teagarden explained, and I needed to strengthen my in- 
ner quadriceps, the muscles that stabilize the kneecap, 
to compensate. My left arm sometimes felt as if it were 
going to pop out of its socket; Teagarden blamed it on a 
weakened muscle around my shoulder joint, probably 
injured in the riding accident I had when I was eleven. 
My "protracted shoulders" — put plainly, I slump — 
were probably left over from pregnancy and the subse- 
quent hauling around of my now two-year-old son. 

On to stage two: the submaximal aerobic test. Train- 
er Toni McGinley set me astride a stationary bike, 
strapped a sensor around my chest, and monitored my 
heart rate at three-minute intervals as the work load 
progressed from easy to very hard. McGinley watched 
for any dramatic changes in blood pressure or heart 
rate, but unlike a maximal stress test — which works 
you until you can't go on or until abnormalities show up 
on an electrocardiogram — the primary purpose here 
wasn't medical. Rather, the idea was to see how well 
my heart pumped oxygen to my muscles and, thus, 
where my training heart rate should be. (The American 
College of Sports Medicine recommends maximal 
stress tests only for men and women over forty-five and 
younger individuals at risk for heart disease because of 
family history, smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, 
or abnormal cholesterol levels.) 

Using calipers to pinch my 
skin and underlying fat in The goal of O 
several places, McGinley es- 
timated that I was 18 percent 
fat — solidly within the de- 

sired range of body composi- tielp yOU get 
tion for most women. Then 

she fed all her measurements niore OUt Of yOUr 
into the computer. The num- 
bers showed I was doing 
well. My resting heart rate 

was below average. My blood pressure was normal. 
My rate of oxygen consumption was good, though it 
could be improved 5 to 25 percent with training. 

Finally, we came to strength testing. I did as many 
abdominal crunches as I possibly could and bench- 
pressed increasing amounts of weight until I reached 
my maximum. McGinley also strapped me into a ► 158 



fitness test: to 



workouts 



156 



VOGUE MAY 1990 



p 



All you have to be is you. 



Liz Claiborne 



A 



The Fragrance 




FITNESS 



space-age machine that charted the strength and endur- 
ance of my leg muscles on a computer screen. 

At the end of the session. I was handed an impressive 
thirty page document explaining the results of my test. 
All the graphs and charts and mathematical equations 
were there — not that I could understand them all. But 
there was plenty of clear, solid advice to take home. 
even if I didn't choose to have a Plus One trainer design 
a workout for me. Stretching and weight lifting to 
strengthen my upper body would help me stand 
straighter and bolster my shoulder joint. Avoiding 
lunges in aerobics classes would save my knee. And if 1 
ever needed to know my ham/quad ratio. I could al- 
ways look it up on my printout. 

Profile Fitness Club for Women 

The fitness test used here is probably the most common 
one found in gyms and health clubs. There are no com- 
puters involved, and at S52, it's relatively cheap. 
While it concentrates on just two components of fit- 
ness — cardiovascular conditioning and body composi- 
tion — that's all most people are interested in. 

"A woman might be very thin but still have a high 
percentage of body fat," says Kristi Wright, a sports 
scientist and fitness consultant at Profile. "Or she may 
be really strong muscularly but cardiovascularly in 
poor shape. A test lets us both know where she is, then 
helps the trainer and the client establish an appropriate 
exercise program. " 

Wright began with questions about my medical his- 
tor>'. Then she did a twelve-minute sub- 
maximal aerobic test very similar to 
Plus One's, and with the same results. 
There was more discrepancy in the re- 
sults of the body composition test. 
Wright said 1 was 26 percent fat, about 
average for women but still over the rec- 
ommended 23 percent and well above 
Plus One's measurement. That didn't 
alarm me much. No matter what meth- 
od is used — calipers, underwater 
weighing, or electrical impedance — body composition 
tests can be off by up to 5 percent, more if fewer or less 
precise measurements are taken. As Motta told me, 
■'Short of cutting you ojsen and weighing your actual 
fat, there's no really accurate test." But at least these 
methods are more accurate than height/weight tables. 

The big difference here was in the interpretation of 
results. Based on my bike performance, Wright ad- 
vised me to start training three days a week, when I was 
already working out five or six days. Still, she did con- 
vince me that I needed a more balanced program. I did 
push-ups and sit-ups, but those weren't enough, she 
said. As for my worry^ that weight training would make 
me look like Mrs. Universe, she explained that weights 
could help me tone and strengthen muscles, thereby in- 
creasing my lean body mass; I'd have healthier bones 
and better jX)sture as a result. 



A woman may 

be very thin 

but still have a 

high percentage 

of body fat 



Sports/Dance/Fitness Training Institute 

Marianne Battistone, owner of this one-on-one training 
facility on New York's Upper East Side, offers a two- 
hour evaluation for SI 75 that measures strength, flexi- 
bility, and aerobic endurance but goes far beyond. 
Battistone has spent eighteen years teaching dancers 
and athletes how to get more out of their bodies with a 
technique called Laban Movement Analysis, and she 
looks at the fit body as an artist does. 

"Whether a person can do twenty push-ups or sit- 
ups doesn't tell me if she's fit," she says. "A book may 
say that you ought to be able to do .v because of your age 
and sex. but because of the way you prefer to move 
your body every day as a result of injuries, social condi- 
tioning, and lifestyle, you may not be able to do it." 

Battistone began her test with a medical question- 
naire and a bike test. That's where the standard proce- 
dures ended. Battistone used no weights during the 
strength test, evaluating my strength only against her 
own resistance. Then she watched me move. She tested 
my joints for range of motion, subtly manipulating me 
with her hands. She watched as 1 did lunges and arm 
circles and walked while raising my arms — in-motion 
activities that she calls testing for dynamic alignment. 
"If you can't perform in good alignment while you're 
in motion, all the other stuff is worthless because you 
won't progress," she says. 

Battistone 's approach is being adopted by many spe- 
cialists who recognize that coordination and range of 
motion are part of being fit. "The emphasis in most 
strength testing is on superficial mus- 
cles," says Battistone. "For example, 
a standard abdominal strength test re- 
cords how many upper-body crunches 
you can do in a minute. What I look at is 
how you do a sit-up. based on the 
strength and alignment of the psoas — 
the core muscle that runs from the low 
back to the inner thigh and is key to the 
body ' s upright posture . ' ' 

Battistone's advice to me was subtly 
different from what I'd heard elsewhere. My joints 
were hypermobile. she said— a flexibility dancers 
would kill for. but a potential danger unless I strength- 
ened the muscles around the ligaments to keep the 
joints stable. She strengthened my resolve to pay as 
much attention to form as endurance when I exercised. 
Each of the three testing methods I experienced has 
something to offer. So the question isn't really whether 
you need a fitness test — you'll assuredly get something 
out of it — but what kind of test is best. If injuries plague 
you. try a sports medicine clinic. If you want to know 
generally how fit you are, a basic test at your gym 
should be fine. And if you want more insight into the 
way you move, look for a tester with some movement 
training. There's only one absolute criterion: "A good 
fitness test." says Marianne Battistone, "should help 
you learn about your body . " • 



158 
15b 



VOG I E M A^ 199 




INIUmnrSWORLILTHOSEWHO 
WT READ WIU GET BUniUNAWIHl 



)r the 27 million Americans who can't read, competing 
today's marketplace is nearly impossible. And unfortu- 
iiely, the future for children of illiterate parents is not 
uch brighter Unless, of course, the cycle of illiteracy is 
'oken and their children learn to read. 

You can help fight illiteracy by reading to a child, 
id by giving a child a book. The Coors Foundation for 
imily Literacy is proud to offer a very special children's 
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Kylie's Song. A beautiful 32-page soft cover book and an 
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NAME 



ADDRESS 






CITY'STATE-ZIP 






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PHONE 



Send $395 to Coors Foundation for Family Literacy 
PO. Box 46666, Denver, CO 80201 



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Q)ors Foundation For Family Literacy. 

c 1990 Coors Brewing Company Goioen CoiOfado 80401 • B'ewef c ^ - 9 Quality Beers Since 1873 



wmm 



Around here, a century of breeding can be revealed in a 
split second. 



What's true for the championship trotters raised at 
Hanover Shoe Farms is also true for the timepieces made 
a few miles up the road at the Hamilton Watch Company, 
of Lancaster, Pa. The new Hamilton chronographs, 
for instance: 

Nearly a century of watchmaking expertise is 
revealed in their beautifully functional designs. 
Each features elapsed second and minute hands, 
and three dials marking elapsed hours, tenths of 
a second, and continuous seconds. Most models 
also feature a date display. 

Like the horses of Hanover Shoe Farms, the 
Hamilton chronographs demonstrate that it 
takes generahons to produce a champion that 
performs as well as it looks. 







Piping Rock 
Chronograph 



jSo iSbVso^ 



>. 



Classic 
Chronograph // 



J 




Jlamilton 



B U L L D r KS Since 1892 Lancaster, Pennsylvania U.S.A. nnQ< 

i.s,i^,~i«;,^c a division ot ana InSek 



In Selected Scores 



owdo millions of women dress for success? 








^&^ 



To find out why women choose Citibank cards to dress for success, turn the page. 

Please use ballpoint pen Select One: Citibank Classic D IVIasterCard® or D Visa® 



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By stgning Deiow i auinorize v<itioank (bouin uakota), N a to cnecK my credit history and exchange iniormaiion about now i nandie my account with proper persons, affiliates and credit bureaus it I am 
issued a card. I authorize my employer, my bank, and any other relerences listed above to release and/or verify Information to Citibank (South Dakota), N.A and Its affiliates in order to determine my 
eligibility for the Citibank Classic card and any renewal or future extension of credit If I ask, I will be told whether or not consumer reports on me were requested and the names of the credit bureaus with 
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Please allow 30 days to process your applk:atnn. Do not 
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later. O Copyright 1990 Citibank (South Dakota) N.A. 
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Date Rev 2-90 



CmBAN<& 

A CITICORP COMPANY 



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PEOPLE ARE TALKING ABOUT. 



_„_^_^_^^ ■•onrix/ ^^ ^^^ ^"'y ^ matter of time. First they allowed cameras in the 
Cuiliera reuay courtroom; now come actual courtroom channels. In 

Court will broadcast from the forty-four states that permit in-court coverage, and offer movies with 
a legal bent. The American Lawyer Media Channel, a spin-off of the legal journal, boasts commen- 
tary on live courtroom action from former CBS newsman Fred Graham, as well as from the paper's 
two hundred reporters and editors around the country. Competition between the two — scheduled to 
appear next fall — is already heating up, but that may not be their biggest problem. Real trials, says 
Republic Pictures' Charles Larsen, are "boring, dull, harsh, cruel, and not always perfect." He 
should know. Viewers preferred the canned cases of Judge Wapner and Victor Sif uentes to his 
company's failed On Trial. . . .A new line of products from Spytech can turn anyone into 
Maxwell Smart — or a suspect. Gym bags, handbags, personal computers, and wall clocks 
all come equipped with video recording devices, as do Bond-like wristwatches and a more im- 
probable pinball machine. Even Garfield the cat may be watching. Those cute little critters you 
see reclining on back dashboards? They're really stuffed with cameras .... 

mi^i^J^Lm^^^ ^^^mi^^^m^^m mm»m^^-^m»^ The fashion and design communities continue 
clothes consciousness ,orally round .he rainLes.. Braziliandesigner 
Suzana Monacella has affixed her trademark sequins to a tee that reads save THE amazone. And 
Hermes hosted receptions in eight U.S. stores to benefit the Rainforest Alliance and local con- 
servation organizations. Nature motifs — fruits, rocks, and shells — already appear on the com- 
pany's wares as part of its Year of the Outdoors theme. But by far the most festive 
environmental logo comes from Martin Stein, whose company's tees read ELVis loves 
CLEAN AIR. . . . Artwear has snagged the licensing contract to put Warhol designs on tee 
shirts. . . .The hottest accessory of the season: buttons boasting Nelson Mandela's 
likeness. Where to buy: street vendors in Harlem .... 

rlirt%# \Atf\^tf^ ^^^ Green Consumer, new from Penguin, offers shoppers an environ- 
# mentally correct trip through the aisles. A brand-specific guide on what to 

buy and what to avoid, the book includes such products as furniture made from materials that won't 
deplete the ozone layer, and cosmetics "good for the individual and the planet." . . . It's never too 
late. South Carolina Republican Strom Thurmond, who at eighty-seven is seeking 
his ninth term in the Senate, has made the environment one of his chief campaign issues. This from a 
man — and a state — who once equated smokestacks with paychecks. Of course, he used to be a racist 
too .... The South Africans would do well to take a leaf from Thurmond's book — on both issues — 
but particularly since a new study says the country will be a "wasteland" in fifty years if environ- 
mental issues continue to be ignored. And now that the veil has been lifted in Eastern Europe, it is 
apparent that outmoded technologies and dependence on cheap fuels have caused pollution levels 
extreme by any standards. Doctors in Hungary estimate that at least 10 percent of the coun- 
try's deaths are directly related to pollution. In Budapest, citizens stand in line for fifteen-minute 
turns in "inhalitoriums," telephone booth-size closets in which they can breathe clean air. . . . 

far A vn I ll^ ^'" ^^^'^y ^^^ succumbed to the Energizer bunny. A new Video Sto- 

ryboard Tests, Inc.. poll shows that Americans are tired of celebrity com- 
mercials. In 1981. seven of the twenty-five most popular ads were for soft drinks, which rely most 
heavily on famous faces, compared with only two in 1989. What sells now: animation, animals, and 
fantasy. . . .Theymay not sell products, but they do sell books. Six of the ten best-selling nonfiction 
books of 1 989 were by or about celebrities .... This summer three books on shadow celeb Salman 
Rushdie will hit the stands. Among them: The Rus/ulie File, a compilation of articles about 
the Rushdie-Ayatollah dustup, and Salman Rushdie: Sentenced to Death, which will 
focus on Rushdie's background and the genesis of his Satanic Verses. In the third. The Rushdie 
Affair, Middle East expert Richard Pipes examines the incident's effect on Islam itself. "It's in 
many ways an attractive religion," says Pipes. "But we never see that side. " — ^JULIA REED 

\ OC, I H M A"* 1 ') VO l65 




RALPH LAUREN 



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PERSONAL A D V E N /!' L R E 




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MOVIES 

In two new movies, Jennifer Jason Leigh again 
plays a woman on the verge, david edelstein wants 
to understand just what makes Jenny B. Bad 

THERE'S A STORY DIRECTOR ULI EDEL 
tells about Jennifer Jason Leigh, who gets 
gang-banged by thirty or forty men in the 
excruciating climax of Last Exit to Brook- 
lyn. As the scene was about to be shot, 
Leigh (who plays a prostitute named Tra- 
lala) stood up before the mob of actors 
dressed as sailors, laborers, and vagrants, 
and said, "Don't forget, it's only acting." 
There was an awed silence; then the actors 
broke into applause. 

They were accommodating words, the 
words of a trouper — and characteristic of 
Leigh. At twenty-eight, she is perhaps 
Hollywood's reigning no-part-too-trau- 
matic young actress. In her first feature 
film. Eyes of a Stranger, she was a mute, 
deaf, and blind girl fighting off a psycho. 
In her third. Fast Times at Ridgemont 
High, she did a nude scene and lost her vir- 
ginity (in close-up). She weighed in at 
eighty-six pounds as an anorexic teenager 
in the TV movie The Best Little Girl in the 
World. Subsequent 






- ^ •! 



Bad girls wear white: hip-length denim jacket by Guess?, with Levi's 
jeans, left, and lace tank dress by Tom and Linda Piatt 

roles have been no gentler: she has been pulled apart by 
trucks in The Hitcher; raped by wastrels in Flesh + 
Blood; sexually assaulted and shackled in the thriller 
Heart of Midnight. In the current Miami Blues, her 
small-town call girl in love with a psychopath (Alec 
Baldwin) seems kid stuff by comparison. 

Sensationalism aside, what emerges from Leigh's 
performances is not just her penchant for extreme parts. 
It's her ability to transform herself from role to role — to 
change her look, her walk, her accent, her per- ►172 



168 



V O G I' E MAY 1990 



^ 




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MOVIES 



sonality — and yet retain something that's distinctly 
hers: a kind of openness. 

Today there are no signs of Tralala in Jennifer Jason 
Leigh. Looking worn from her three-month stint at 
New York's Circle Repertory Company (playing an ex- 
otic dancer in a pom booth), she seems almost per- 
versely undramatic. 

"I'm attracted to people who behave from their gut, 
because I don't," she explains. "People who are im- 
pulsive and crude and violent and all these things that I 
am not by nature. I'm very cerebral and quiet and shy 
and . . . inhibited. I don't go to parties; if I do I stand by 
the food. I'm terrible at small talk. " 

Many people think Jennifer Jason Leigh is Janet 
Leigh's daughter and Jamie Lee Curtis 's half sister. 
Actually, it's a misconception: she isn't related to ei- 
ther. She is the daughter of the late Vic Morrow and 
writer Barbara Turner (who wrote a TV movie called 
Freedom, starring Mare Winningham, based on 
Leigh's older sister, Carrie, who ran off with a carnival 
at age sixteen). Morrow was killed shortly before Fast 
Times at Ridgemont High opened; what should have 
been the best year of Leigh's life (giving a marvelous 
performance in a lead role in a surprise smash) was in- 
stead the most terrible . Asked if she was close to her fa- 
ther, she answers quickly: "No, I wasn't, but I don't 
talk about my dad, not even with my closest friends. ' ' 

In many ways, she thinks, she's still trying to com- 
pensate for a childhood in which she compared herself 
with Carrie. "She was the bad girl and I was the good 
girl," Leigh recalls. "But we were extremes. She was 
extremely bad and I was extremely good. I've used 
Carrie for a lot of parts I've played. She's very gut. 
Now she's a mom and she's got kids, and I'm playing 
all these gut parts . . . . " 

What attracts her most, she says, is their loneliness — 
the loneliness of young women with small dreams. She 
played the waitress in The Hitcher because ' T thought it 
captured a girl who lives in a small town and dreams of 
getting out and you know that she never will. ' ' 

She did Heart of Midnight for similar reasons. Her 
performance as a disturbed young woman who inherits 
her uncle's seedy nightclub is wonderfully eccentric 
and seductive. But her brilliance couldn't save the pic- 
ture. "It was after seeing that movie," Leigh says, 
"that I decided I can't do movies where I just say, 'Oh, 
this is an interesting character.' I really have to look at 
things as a whole. Because I work so hard. And then to 
see a movie where . . . it's not a good movie . . . and it 
could never have been . . . . " 

This spring, with Last Exit and Miami Blues, she's 
hoping she can finally connect with audiences as she al- 
ready has with critics. It will be tough: neither film is 
blockbuster material. Based on Hubert Selby, Jr.'s no- 
torious 1964 novel. Last Exit to Brooklyn is a bleak, 
ham-handed epic about the brutal life of the working 
class under capitalism, replete with New Testament 
symbolism. Miami Blues is a strenuously quirky black 



comedy that mixes absurdist humor and graphic vio- 
lence, and never seems quite in control of itself. 

But Leigh is passionate, in particular, about Last 
Exit, in ivhich her Tralala lures sailors to junkyards on 
the pretext of fellating them, then stands by while her 
male accomplices bash the unsuspecting stooges over 
the head and make off with their wallets. 

' ' She is the most innocent woman I ' ve ever played , ' ' 
says Leigh. "Here's this woman leading this totally 
amoral life who really has no concept of anything else. 
She has lived her whole life without feeling anything 
but rage. Anything else would be incredibly dangerous 




Luring the lonely: Leigh in Last Exit to Brooklyn 



because in that society . . .it's really a matter of surviv- 
al. But she doesn't know that. She doesn't see her life 
as surviving. She thinks her life is. . .great. And that 
just broke my heart. That's why I wanted to get inside 
and see if I could understand that. ' ' 

Some parts are more taxing, like her role in Miami 
Blues — a hooker from Okeechobee, Florida, who 
dreams of being a housewife and owning a Burger King 
franchise. "She has very little sense of self," says Leigh. 
"So little that the first guy who asks her to go away with 
him and be his wife — who she knows for a period of may- 
be twelve hours — she goes with. She doesn't ask any 
questions about him because she's terrified to know the 
answers. . . .To play someone like that, someone who 
wants to be loved so badly, is really painful. ' ' 

Listening to Leigh, you get a clue to why her acting is 
so vital. By becoming an actress, she taught herself to 
feel. That's why she gravitates toward extreme roles, 
ones that force her into the open (albeit in disguise). 
That's why she has no inhibitions on the screen, why 
shell do anything required if it's "important to the piece. " 

"There may come a time when I'll say 'I've done 
it — I've played the whores, the call girls, the girls who 
work in pom booths. I've explored them thoroughly 
and I don't need to explore them any further.' But I 
don't feel that yet. They still hold some attraction and 
some mystery for me. " • 



172 



VOGUE MAY 1990 



i ,! 



Introducing 
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TELEVISION 




PBS's Mystery! is a 
showcase for brilliant 
Brit actors, cathleen schine 
admires John Thaw as a 

detective who can't 
stand the sight of blood 

PBS'S MYSTERY!. NOW CELEBRATING ITS TENTH ANNI- 
versary, has long been a comfy nook for mystery ad- 
dicts. But it's also a showcase for startlingly original 
and fluent British actors, those minor geniuses who 
make up an awfully large proportion of the population 
of such a small country. Actors like Jeremy Brett (Sher- 
lock Holmes) and Joan Hickson (Miss Marple) are not 
young, they're not "discoveries," they're not stars — 
they're just great actors. 

In the Inspector Morse series, John Thaw, as the bit- 
ter, philosophical, Oxford-educated Oxford detective 
Morse, is another example. White-haired and disgrun- 
tled, Thaw's Morse has an ironic sense of his own desti- 
ny: he knows he'll solve the crime, but not the sin 
behind it. The knowledge of this ultimate defeat seems 
to pull at him like gravity and to propel 
him at the same time. Even Thaw's 
voice takes on the cadence of dissatis- 
faction — his sentences often fall in a 
sudden dip, the sound of hopeless impa- 
tience. With economy, humor, and sub- 
tle irritation. Thaw plays this middle- 
aged bachelor as a thoroughly demor- 
alized moral man. 

When he drives through the narrow streets of Oxford 
in his round, gleaming Jaguar, listening to Maria Callas 
singing Tosca, his grateful enjoyment of the music is 
more than pleasure — it is disgust for everything that is 
not Maria Callas's Tosca. For unlike his predecessors, 
Morse does not think the game of detection jolly good 
fun. He thinks it sordid, a reflection of the equally 
sordid world. But the arena of academic jealousies in 
Inspector Morse's Oxford is also extremely funny — 
these powerful, pompous, and sometimes rich men 
scheme shamelessly. "Oh, the usual college jealou- 
sies, you know," someone always remarks. Rival 
academics — economists, art historians, classicists — 
eloquently insult each other, then shoot, stab, pound, 
and hack each other to bits. 

Inspector Morse is a wonderfully modem incarna- 
tion of the English mystery novel's eccentric detective. 
Instead of brimming with fussbudget enthusiasm, tend- 
ing his roses or his mustache or his wardrobe as do other 
classic detectives, Morse, a connoisseur of cultural and 
social despair, cultivates a morose intelligence. He is 



»i:r 



Morse knows 

he'll solve the 

crime, but not 

the sin behind it 



John Thaw plays Morse as a demoralized moral man. 

viscerally offended by crime. Inspector 
Morse cannot stand the sight of blood. 

"You'd better get someone to identi- 
fy the. . .uh. . thing, Lewis," he says 
to his amused assistant (Kevin Whately) 
as he gestures toward a waterlogged 
severed head. And he is equally dis- 
gusted by the suspects. "Too much 
sangfroid by far," he murmurs darkly, 
contemplating the languid, icy snobbery of an aristo- 
cratic family he must investigate (Patricia Hodge is 
brilliantly appalling as Lady Hanbury in this one, 
called "The Ghost in the Machine"). 

Lewis, the faithful Newcastle-accented assistant 
who never gets to finish a cup of tea, is indulgent of his 
master's superiority C'Were, Lewis," Morse tells him 
with a sigh. "If you were. You'll never get on if you 
can't master your subjunctive"). But he's never a buf- 
foon — more a dose of wholesome reality in the rarefied 
Oxford of which Inspector Morse, with all his disdain, 
is still a part. 

Morse, like Sherlock Holmes, is a hero of ratiocina- 
tion. He doesn't act; he thinks. And with Lewis we lis- 
ten and watch as Morse's mind wanders, pauses, and 
finally leaps to its destination. Once in a while, an epi- 
sode is pretentious and obscure ("The Settling of the 
Sun," for instance), but as a rule, the fragmented, dis- 
turbing, indirect style of Inspector Morse is oddly tan- 
talizing. These mysteries are intelligent without being 
prim — a little like Inspector Morse himself. • 



174 



VOG I E MAY 1990 



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QUENTiN CRISP finds Hanif Kureishi's first novel 

delightful, curious, perceptive, funny, and insightful 



THE BUDDHA OF SUBURBIA (VIKING), A FIRST NOVEL BY 
Hanif Kureishi, the scriptwriter oi My Beautiful 
Laundrette and Sammy andRosie Get Laid, is delight- 
ful — curious, perceptive, and funny. 

The Buddha of the title is a middle-aged Indian 
gentleman who has settled in South London, married 
an Englishwoman, and fathered two sons, the older 
of whom, called Karim or, with a mixture of affec- 
tion and contempt. Creamy, is the hero of this tale. 




Hanif Kureishi, scriptwriter turned novelist 
The narrative is written in the first person, which 
robs the author of his most powerful weapon, a 
god's-eye view of events, but for anything this story 
lacks in scope, it certainly compensates with depth. 
To achieve this, Kureishi, forgivably, cheats a little. 
Though the style of writing is casual, even at times 
ungrammatical, it is adorned with sophisticated liter- 
ary references (Proust's Madame Verdurin is men- 
tioned) and displays an awareness of people's feelings 
th ' Karim's appalling behavior shows he lacks. 
K^rim is a truly ambiguous character on all 

180 



fronts — a part-time Indian and a part-time homosex- 
ual, an erotic amoeba copulating with whoever is 
available. Since this tale takes place when he is in his 
late teens, he is also only a part-time adult. 

As for the older characters, it is their deliberate In- 
dianness that gives them their special eccentricity. 
Karim's uncle goes on a hunger strike in order to 
force his daughter to accept a traditional arranged 
marriage with someone she has never met. At first for 
no reason but later for profit, Ka- 
rim's father starts to preach a vague 
Buddhist philosophy to anyone who 
will listen and to some who will 
not. This provokes droll passages 
of dialogue. "There are many more 
things. . .in heaven and earth than 
you damn well dream of in Penge," 
says the Buddha. To which the reply 
is, "I haven't got time to dream nor 
should you be dreaming. Wake up! 
What about getting some promotion 
so that Margaret can wear some nice 
clothes?" 

While their elders indulge in their 
Indianness, the young people strug- 
gle to outlive it. American readers 
must be reminded that the British are 
an island race who have not accepted 
foreign intrusion since that famous 
unpleasantness with the Normans. 
Karim and his friends are subjected 
to daily insults and one of them is 
physically attacked in the street. And 
Karim is angry when asked to adopt a 
stage Indian accent while playing in 
an adaptation of a Kipling book. 

Just as accurate as his insight into 
his characters is Kureishi's view of 
London. He sees the Thames as di- 
viding the haves on the north bank 
from the have-nots on the south side. 
Karim starts life in South London where, in the high 
streets, "shopping is to the inhabitants what the rum- 
ba is to Brazilians . ' ' Through somewhat sleazy theat- 
rical connections, he graduates to the north side, 
where he associates with what he terms "The 
Brainys, ' ' but it is clear that, in England, he will nev- 
er be truly at home. Restlessness is his heritage. 

The Buddha of Suburbia is seething with life. But 
mixed into this curry of eccentric people, perverse be- 
havior, and ill-matched relationships is a spice of sad- 
ness and anger. It affords a strong and pungent taste of a 
world that most of us could never have imagined. • 



\ ( ) C, IF. M A >• 19 9 




^'i 









uMi 




BACARDI 
BURSTS 




• i 



BUBBLE 

IN1ASTE 

TEST. 



And we did it in head-to-head 
competition. 

We went directly to vodka & tonic 
drinkers, in vodka's top ten markets. And 
in a blind taste test, more than half of 
them chose the taste of Bacardi® rum & 
tonic over their usual vodka & tonic. 

Amazing? Not really, when you 
consider how the smooth, lively char- 
acter of Puerto Rican rum goes so well 
with the bubbly refreshment of tonic. 

So make your own taste test. And 
see how the taste of Bacardi rum & tonic 
makes small potatoes of vodka. 




Bacardi rum. Made in Puerto Rico. 



9 

RUMS OF PUERTO RICO 




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■•??:'.# 



IT HAS EVERYTHING FROM A STOLEN KISS Three centuries of Russian carried out to sea by a bull who seems to 

(by Fragonard, and never was a kiss collecting: Victory of Joshua be treating her as a particularly heavy 

more sweetly choreographed) to one of overtheAma/efcites, byNico- piece of excess baggage. And it has a 

the most beautiful white horses in all '« Poussin, 1625-26,^Bpyi^ painting (The Death ofVirginie by 

painting(by Poussin, inhisra/jcrec/flAZC? °"dsJf!l"l9(W 'opposite'"'' Claude-Joseph Vemet) that dates from 

£rwma). It has a painting by Boucher ' ' '' 1789 and is the progenitor, in its sole self, 
that makes the flight of the Holy Family into Egypt of the French Romantic movement. 



look like a party of pleasure, and an elaborately 
staged tableau (by Greuze) of a dying paralytic being 
comforted by his son-in-law. 

It has a painting (by Claude Lorrain) of Europa being 

182 



If these paintings have anything in common, it is the 
infatuation with all things French that burst out in Rus- 
sia at the time of the accession of Catherine the Great in 
1762. This infatuation gives both momentum and emo- 



VOGUE MAY 1990 




French painting was nowhere more 
revered— or rapaciously consumed— than 
in Russia, reports Rosamond Bernier 




tional consistency to the exhibition From Poussin to 
Matisse: The Russian Taste for French Painting, at the 
MetropoHtan Museum of Art in New York from May 
20 through July 29, and at the Art Institute of Chicago 
from September 8 through November 25. Everything 
in the show comes from either the Hermitage in Lenin- 
grad or the Pushkin Museum in Moscow. 

Catherine the Great beUeved in abundance, both for 
its own sake and because from abundance comes abun- 
dance. She knew that a great city had to have great art, 
and plenty of it. "1 am not a connoisseur," she once 



said. "I'm a glutton." She lived up to it. 

Her obsession with France — her Gallomania, as it 
was often called — was all-inclusive, exuberant, and to- 
tal. The books that aristocratic Russians read, the new 
thoughts that came their way northward from Paris, the 
flatware and the porcelain they found on the table, the 
operas and the plays they sat through (some of them 
with words by Catherine hersell), the clothes on their 
backs, and the tutors and governesses who looked after 
their children — all had to have a French accent. 

In St. Petersburg, the still-new capital of a re- ► 186 



e fabulous and lovely all the time. 




Seriously 



c a s u a 



I s h 



o e 



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ART 



luctantly westernized Russia, Gallomania 
made itself felt all the way from higher educa- 
tion to publishing, the warp and woof of tapes- 
try, and the perfection of bottine and boot. 
There was a free market for everything French. 
If gossip was what you wanted, you could get it 
direct from Paris — copied by hand to escape the 
censors — and masterminded by Baron Grimm, 
who knew just how to keep his subscribers 
amused. If you wanted to shine at court, you 
had to shine in French. Russian was for boors. 
That was the principle behind Catherine's art 
collecting. She bought paintings in Paris on a 
very grand scale (more than 460 paintings from 
the Crozat collection alone), but she also went 
shopping for ideas. When she wanted to pay hon- 




or to Peter the Great, she chose a French sculptor, 
Etienne-Maurice Falconet, to make the equestrian statue 
that is to this day the noblest thing of its kind in Russia. 

When she wanted to endow her capital city with an 
ideal university, she asked for advice from Denis Dide- 
rot, the foremost French intellectual of the day. She 
wanted Diderot, just as she wanted Voltaire, for the 
fireworks of the mind that they knew how to set off. 

If she couldn't get them in person, she would settle 
for their libraries. But when Diderot was strapped for 
money and sold her all his books, she was clever 
enough to pay him the agreed sum, give him an annual 
retainer, and tell him to keep the books for his lifetime. 
Not only did this give her a lien on one of the cleverest 
men in Europe. It gave her the entree to a whole network 
of scouts and informers who could tell her what paintings 
were coming on the market. And though Voltaire never 
responded to her blandishments, she went after his library 
the moment he died. (She would also have liked to build a 
replica of his Swiss retreat, the Chateau de Femey, in the 
park of Tsarskoye Selo, her country palace.) 



Claude Lorrain's 1655 Landscape 
with the Rape of Europa, ABOVE, 
bought by Prince Nikolai Yusupov 
in 1798. LEFT: Jean-Honore 
Fragonard's Stolen Kiss, late 
1780s, acquired by the Hermitage 
in 1895. BOTTOM: The Death of 
Virginie, by Claude-Joseph Vernet, 
1789, bought by Catherine the 
Great's son, Paul I. 

Other Russian collectors were to 
follow her example . Some of them 
were in Paris already. Others — 
above all Prince Nikolai Yusu- 
pov — went to Paris, made friends 
with the best painters of the day, 
and gave them commissions. Yu- 
supov for one was far more dis- 
cerning than Catherine the Great, 




but in her grasp of the role of art m statecraft she was the 
mother of them all. To this day, when we remember 
that in the Hermitage one painting in four is of French 
origin and that in Moscow the Pushkin Museum owns 
more than seven hundred French paintings of one sort 
or another, we know who gave the initial thrust. 

The extent of her persistence was brought ►IBS 



186 



\' O G r E M A ■> 19 9 



YSATIS 



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MACY'S 



ART 



home a year or two ago when I went to stay at Houghton 
Hall, one of the great country palaces of England. 
When Sir Robert Walpole, prime minister of England, 
lived there in the first half of the eighteenth century, he 
had not only a great Palladian mansion but one of the 
finest collections of paintings in England. But his prof- 
ligate grandson and heir decided he would rather have 
money than art. Catherine heard about it, moved fast, 
and bought the whole collection. The English were out- 
raged. Not for the last time, members of Parliament 
predicted that England's artistic heritage would be dis- 
mantled and sold off to foreigners. Cries of "This sale 
has to be stopped!" were heard on every side. But it 
couldn't be stopped, and it wasn't, and overnight the 
Hermitage became one of the world's great galleries. 

When I was at Houghton, the Dowager Marchioness 
of Cholmondeley, who in her early nineties still lives 
there, brought out contemporary engravings and 
showed me exactly where each painting had once hung. 
The loss was almost beyond computation. But when 
walking through the house I couldn't fail to notice in the 
grand salon a familiar figure — Catherine the Great, in a 
portrait by Roslin that she had sent from St. Petersburg 
as a consolation present for the house. 

When the French Revolution broke out in 1789, and 
when Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were executed 



in 1793, Catherine thought less well of France. In fact, 
she forced every Frenchman then living in Russia to 
swear an oath of loyalty to the institution of monarchy. 
(Only forty-three of fifteen hundred refused.) But the 
French tastes she had urged upon her subjects had taken 
deep root and could not be done away with overnight. 

Yusupov had worked hard for Catherine during her 
Gallomaniacal years, but when he bought for himself 
he did not buy for reasons of cultural strategy. Nor did 
he need to have anyone around to tell him what was 
good. He acted as an individual who was rich enough, 
and intelligent enough, to judge for himself. Looking at 
the frankly and colossally voluptuous painting Hercu- 
les and Omphale by Boucher, we know that it took a 
bold and free spirit, acting on his own, to buy it. And 
when Yusupov commissioned Sappho, Phaon, and 
Cupid from Jacques-Louis David in 1808, he took a 
risk in regard to conventional taste. 

French painting between the death of David in 
1 825 and the ascendancy of Manet in the 1 870s is rep- 
resented thinly or not at all in the exhibition. There is 
more than one reason for this. To begin with, the hi- 
erarchies of French painting in the lifetime of Cather- 
ine the Great were set in large part by royal or 
aristocratic patronage. In the early years of French 
Impressionism and thereafter, however, pa- ^190 



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ART 



tronage of this kind played no part 
whatever in the evolution of high art. 
Faced with the kind of painting that is 
now universally admired. Napoleon 
III would say, "This is the painting of 
democrats — men who don't change 
their linen . ' ' From the first French Im- 
pressionist exhibition of 1874 on- 
ward, art ran contrary to genteel taste. 

At that same time, money and pow- 
er began to shift from the great aristo- 
cratic families who lived mainly in St. 
Petersburg to new men and new for- 
tunes based mainly in Moscow. To 
buy the art of Manet and Monet and 
Cezanne and Gauguin was to stand on 
one's own in defiance of established 
opinion. » 

That is the sense of the second half of 
the show. Twenty-seven of the fifty- 
one paintings are devoted to Manet, Re- 
noir, Cezanne. Gauguin, Bonnard, 
Matisse (ten paintings), and the Douan- 
ier Rousseau. As in the first half, the 
choice of works is neither automatic, 
nor random, nor whimsical. Pairings 
and reunitings of a thoughtful, unex- 
pected sort play a great part. 

Now that many of the paintings are 
among the most popular and sought-af- 
ter in the entire canon of European 
painting, it should be said that they were 
bought when the audience for them was 
tiny. The two Russian collectors pri- 
marily responsible were Ivan Morosov 
and Sergei Shchukin. 

They bought for themselves. They 
had no scouts or intermediaries and 
needed none They went to Paris on 
their own and bought what took their 
fancy. Today it is universally agreed 
that the hmge of painting in Paris in the 
late nineteenth an 1 early twentieth cen- 
turies may be said to have turned upon 
their collections. But at the time they 
bought, there ,vai no such consensus, 
rhey were on theit jvvn 

And .\ha" -U'laiiied thenV^ A feeling 
foi the true ind the good in French 
painting Cathenne the Great manifest 
ed that feelint? though she lelied on oth 
ers to guide her Morosov and Shchukin 
had no one to guide them (They did not 
jven guide each other ^ But they shared 
her conviction that a great city needs 
great art How well they acted on it! 
And how lucky we are to be able to trace 
the results of that .onviction! • 



190 



V O G I E M A <! 19 9 



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By Tracy Young 



Geniuses 51 Us 



You know a lot of geniuses. You should meet some stupid 

people once in a while. You could learn something. 

— Woody Allen to Diane Keaton in Manhattan 

"DID YOU KNOW," ASKS LIZ SMITH IN THE NEW YORK DAILY 
News, "that Mr. [David] Brown is the genius who invented 
Cosmopolitan for his wife?' ' No, we did not, but we're suffi- 
ciently humbled now. 

"Marketing genius" Chris Whittle, who thought a good 
way to sell detergent would be to develop a magazine for 
maids, has been praised for his "evil genius," which was the 
press's pet name for Ted Bundy. 

Critics are fond of using the term "minor genius." Minor 
genius? Like a minor act of God? 

"Is genius too big a word?" wonders Clive Barnes in a re- 
view of Eric Bogosian's new show. "Depends, ' ' he quibbles 
sagely, "on how promiscuously you use it." 

Promiscuous ain't the half of it. Cruising for genius may 
just be the come-on of the nineties. 

Once upon a time, genius (or at least the nerdy, quantifiable 
kind of genius with ballpoint-pen stains on 
its breast pocket and spectacles like shot 
glasses) could be reckoned by the Stan- 
ford-Binet Intelligence Test. Then, in 
1969, Arthur Jensen published his findings 
suggesting that certain races scored higher 
in basketball than on traditional IQ tests, a 
discovery that made liberals squirm (and their offspring major in 
macrame) until they realized that Asians tested better than 
whites. They needn't have worried for long. Just ask Marilyn! 
Because Parade columnist Marilyn vos Savant, who claims the 
highest test score in the world (while others swear she simply 
has the world's worst personality), is ample proof that an IQ of 
228 may sound great, but you can't dance to it. Sistine Chapel? 
Let's hear it for ' 'The Chapel of Love. ' ' 

Today, genius is an Equal Opportunity Appellation. At a 
trendy downtown magazine that one could think of as Allan 
Bloom's Revenge, a writer comes up with a headline and 
shows it to the editor in charge. She shakes her head, stunned 
with disbelief, then smacks herself and gasps: "It's. . . 
it's. . .it's genius!" 

Uptown, a woman asks a friend to recommend a hairdresser. 
She already knows his reputation — he's come up with a look 
that's part early Rose Kennedy, part late B-52's — 
but feels compelled to ask. Is he really any good? Her friend re- 
plies emphatically: "Good? The guy's a genius." 

One might argue that a decent hairdresser has more of a 
purchase on genius than, say, Tama Janowitz, who could use 
one. Or that the pure geometry of a good cut has the elegance 
of a workable equation. But if your hairdresser is a genius, 
where does that leave Faulkner? Can you imagine Einstein 
flogging amaretto? 



If your hairdresser is a 

genius, where does that 

leave Faulkner? 



Welcome to the New Renaissance. The membership of 
Mensa in the Greater New York area is a mere seventeen hun- 
dred — probably because they hold their get-togethers at 
places like Bob's Big Boy right off Exit 40 on the Long Island 
Expressway. But on any given night at 150 Wooster you can 
rub elbows with all manner of genius — from "promotional 
genius" Donald Trump to Madonna, "a kind of genius." 
Just don't rub too hard. Genius has learned how to dress. 
Gone the Rex Harrison threadbare cardigan. All hail Armani, 
who I'm told has a genius for fit. 

Genius. Comes as a noun, goes on like an adjective. It has a 
leaner, meaner ring than fabulous . It's put a human face on 
state of the art. But genius nowadays is even more useful than 
hype; it's a kind of euphemism, a prettifier — like calling gar- 
bagemen sanitation engineers. Which may explain why it is 
used so commonly to describe those who traffic in body parts 
or functions of alimentation. Plastic surgeons "on the cutting 
edge." Chefs, those venerable "Prousts of the pudding." 
Performance artistes with a penchant for vegetables. 

Consider the tale of the opera buff and the dental student at 
a performance of Turandot. Standing in 
the lobby at intermission, the enthusiast 
was pointing out, for the edification of 
his companion, the various luminaries 
who passed their way. "That's Lily 
Pons. . . " he said. "There's Pavarotti's 
mother." 

The student, spotting someone, added in a confidential 
tone: "That's Doctor X. He'sagenius with saliva." 

Truman Capote was one of the few who had the wit to call 
himself a genius; Roseanne Barr was stupid enough to believe 
she was one. But the evil geniuses of genius-mongering know 
that calling someone else a genius can only reflect well on 
you. This is known as the Peggy Noonan Effect. 

When speech writer Noonan looked into the vast emptiness 
called Ronald Reagan, did she see a great man or just an op- 
portunity to bask in the immensity of her own self-impor- 
tance? Noonan is nobody's fool. She knew that: 

Reagan redefined genius as 58.4 percent of the vote. 

Noonan authored a goodly percentage of Reagan. 

The people are never wrong. 

Q.E.D. Peggy Noonan is a genius. 

Q: How many geniuses does it take to screw the country? 

"Who should define the style of the nineties?" HG asked 
Fran Lebowitz, who, forced to punt, replied: "I would like to 
see a genius." 

Wouldn't we all. And if we did, what would we call him? 
Egalitarianism may have put a spin on social intercourse, but 
it's put the language to sleep. Genius is the very thing to say 
when you don't have anything to say at all. And Garbage is a 
much better name for a magazine than Smart. • 



102 



\ O ('.IE M A 1 1 '^ 9 I 



^"i've never t( 
Sometimes...! cf 

VlTABATH TURNS A BATH oitSHOWER 
INTO THE BEST Tl 
MAKES THAT 
HAT SAYS, 'HURRY 

OFF. It's like I sent my 
VACATION. And it worked." 



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HOROSCOPE 

By Athena Stanvoman 



Confusion reigns throughout the beginning of May. With 
Mercury out of phase until the 17th, impeding clear, ratio- 
nal thinking, all ma|iner of unusual problems could arise, 
especially regarding cars and travel. Wait until after May 1 7 
to plan major trips. Best days to plan activities: the 8th to the 
1 1 th, because of the benevolent influence of the full moon in 
Scorpio on the 9th. The new moon in Gemini on the 24th en- 
courages procrastination, particularly over personal rela- 
tionships. 

THE MYTH OF TAURUS 
Some Taureans allow the desire for possessions to rule 
their lives. Others would gladly give you the shirt off their 
back. Mythology reveals why there are such vast differ- 
ences in Taureans' characters. Some people born under this 
sign are ruled by Venus, the most beautiful of the god- 
desses. These Taureans place great importance on their 
beauty, creativity, and romantic dalliances. Other Taur- 
eans are aligned with a more ancient and powerful god- 
dess, now forgotten but once revered as the ultimate deity, 
the Great Earth Goddess. Those under her rule are less 
caught up in the world and often follow spiritual paths. 

TAURUS 

Just when you thought it was safe to relax — this month — along comes the 
Scorpio full moon, linked to your sign by its polarity to Taurus on the zo- 
diac wheel . Under its impact you are guaranteed to discover a few skele- 
tons in your emotional closet. Expect to have some startling realizations 
this month that will set the wheels in motion for events you could not pos- 
sibly predict. 

GEMINI 

Because you are experiencing a time of personal decision making, you 
may begin the month with too much on your mind. Don't worry if this 
throws you temporarily off course. When Mercury returns to its true path 
on May 17, you'll suddenly discover simple solutions to problems that 
previously appeared unsolvable. 

CANCER 

May is your sentimental journey month , as people from your past sudden- 
ly reapf>ear, opening doors in your heart that have been locked for a long 
time. They could shake your normally steely reserve. You may take a step 
backward against your better judgment. Be cautious while you are under 
the spell of the moment. You don't want to commit to responsibilities you 
may later regret. 

LEO 

This month you are going to be placed center stage in your social life or 
through work. But be wary. Your hand will be forced, making you "per- 
form" rather than act naturally. Partners, moneylenders, and authority 
figures want to see the returns on their investments in you. Expect to do 
some tap dancing to keep them happy. 

VIRGO 

The stars bode well again for Virgos this month, but as always, there is a 
trick to making the best of them. Opportunities will not be presenting 
themselves one after the other as in past months, but this allows you time 
to catch up. Ideal planning this month includes a holiday. Give your mind 
an overdue rest while Mercury is out oftune until May 17. At least ease the 
pace as much as possible . HOROSCOPE ► 1 96 



194 



V O G I E S\.\\ 19 9 



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HOROSCOPE 



LIBRA 

Money makes the world go round this month. Facing the conundrum of 
whether or not you have the funds to take a business chance, or simply 
splurge, you will spend many hours pondering your finances, to the extent 
that you risk missing pleasurable pursuits. Realistic cutbacks and budgeting 
are necessary and can make many things possible that previously appeared 
unlikely. A good accountant or a financial wizard will be a migraine saver 
during this time. But remember that money isn't everything. 

SCORPIO 

Prepare to be thrown a double astrological curveball this month that could 
knock you off your feet, but if handled well, might give you a home run. 
Your ruler, Pluto, already pushing you to heady heights, is joined by the 
full moon on the 10th. There's glory coming your way when the full moon 
has you in its sights. If you are tempted to rock the relationship boat during 
May, be careful not to tip it over. 

SAGITTARIUS 

Lucky Sagittarius. Just when most other signs are close to throwing in the 
towel this month, your recharged lucky stars open all the right doors, and 
in fine style you soar on newfound wings. Don't make the mistake of tak- 
ing May's positive energy for granted. Spread some of it around. Whatev- 
er gifts you shower on others will be returned many times over. This 
month you can ' t lose . 

CAPRICORN 

Those pesky planets in Capricorn continue to press you into unusual situa- 
tions this month. Understand that any difficulties are not sent your way to 
discourage you, but to get you back on course. You've always provided 
that dependable shoulder for others to lean on. The time has arrived to re- 
move yourself from responsibilities. Leave your appointments wide open 
and prepare to go where the west wind blows. 

AQUARIUS 

This month so many interfering factors are playing games with your life, 
loves, and business, it is quite likely you will feel distant from what is go- 
ing on around you . But take heart. You may be too close to the situation to 
fully appreciate the wonderful transformation taking place. You are in the 
throes of establishing a better way of life. Happier times than you've ever 
had before are ahead. Don't look back. 

PISCES 

Don't hurry. Maintain a steady pace and May will turn out to be a stellar 
month. You will be internally fired up by the Scorpio full moon on the 
10th. This will provide encouragement, as well as the push you need. De- 
spite your enthusiasm, avoid leaping into situations before you have taken 
a good look. Where romance is putting you to the test, don't give in to the 
temptation to hold in your anger for the sake of keeping the peace. But 
when discussing problems, talk softly and choose your words carefully. 
] 

ARIES 

With Jupiter splendidly aspected to your domestic sector and Venus shin- 
ing radiantly on your love life, focus this month on romantic and home 
affairs. Those renegade planets in Capricorn, still challenging your sign, 
continue to spur you on in career and business areas. You may have al- 
ready had a faint taste of success. This is just the beginning. You are head- 
ing into what could be the best time of your life.» 

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HEALTH 



Some women workers are already facing this choice: 
quit or be sterilized, david kirp^ reports on the trend 
to protect the fetus at the cost of women's jobs 



LATE LAST YEAR IN CHICAGO'S FEDERAL COURTHOUSE, 
a seemingly obscure argument began over the right of 
women to keep their jobs in an auto battery manufactur- 
ing plant. It was a skirmish in an old battle, or so it 
seemed — women had been working in traditionally 
"male" jobs for nearly two decades. But just before 
the appeals hearing was to start, one of the judges 
leaned over the bench toward the attorneys and gave the 
case a different gloss: "This is about the women who 
want to hurt their fetuses," he said. 

The judges' subsequent decision has implications 
for more than twenty million working 
women of childbearing age. Some work 
in heavy industry, like the Johnson 
Controls battery assemblers who chal- 
lenged in court the demand that they 
quit their jobs or be sterilized; others 
work in hospitals as doctors, nurses, 
or lab technicians; still others are art- 
ists, engineers, flight attendants, and 
home remodelers. All, because of the 
careers they've chosen, are occasion- 
ally exposed to radiation or dangerous 
chemicals that can, possibly, cause 
birth defects. 

There have been several other cases 
like this one in recent years, cases in 
which a hospital or manufacturer decid- 
ed that women were incapable of 
weighing risks and making their own 
decisions while pregnant. But Johnson Controls is the 
first company to win the right to bar all fertile women 
from a job because of potential danger to potential fe- 
tuses. The company calls its policy fetal protection. 
The women workers and their lawyers call it discrimi- 
nation, and dangerously precedent setting. On that 
point, one dissenting judge in the case agrees. The dis- 
pute, he contends, is probably the most important sex 
discrimination case since the 1964 Civil Rights Act 
gave women the right to equal treatment on the job. 

Women on the Line 
This particular story begins in August 1982, at Johnson 
Controls' Bennington, Vermont, plant. Ginny Green, 
then fifty, had been working on the battery assembly 
line for eleven years. It was grinding work, lifting 
heavy stacks of battery plates hundreds of times a day, 
but the money it brought in, nine dollars an hour with 
lots of time and a half for overtime, meant she could 
make a real home for her nine-year-old daughter. 

Certainly working in a plant where lead particles 
swirled through the air was not without its hazards, al- 



Millions of 
women, from 

battety 

assemblers to 

doctors, are 

exposed to 

chemicals that 

can cause birth 

defects 



though the risks weren't as high as they once were. Work- 
ers exposed to the toxic metal in the smelting houses and 
potteries of the Industrial Revolution suffered seizures 
and fainting spells, and their limbs went limp with dropsy 
and paralysis. Desperate women, palsied by lead, would 
actually conceive a child in order to pass the heavy metal 
out of their own bodies; they needed no scientist to tell 
them that the fetus would absorb some of the lead the 
mother carried in her blood and be aborted or bom dead. 
So fearfully did doctors of the time view the impact of 
lead on the next generation that lead poisoning was 
known as "race poison. ' ' 

With government regulation of lead 
levels, no worker suffers that degree of 
contamination anymore. Still, some 
people with jobs like Ginny Green's, 
people who repair bridges or radiators 
or work in lead smelters, regularly com- 
plain of fatigue, constipation, hyperten- 
sion, diminished sexual drive, memory 
loss, and mood swings. And the dan- 
gers to fetuses and children — for par- 
ents can bring the metal home on 
fingers, hair, and clothing — are still 
very real. Absorbed in sufficient 
amounts, lead can stunt, even arrest, a 
child's growth and mental develop- 
ment. The federal government esti- 
mates that more than 200,000 children 
below the age of six have blood lead lev- 
els above the twenty-five micrograms per deciliter speci- 
fied as a safe ceiling. The exposure comes from lead- 
based paint, contaminated soil, and polluted water, as 
well as from parents. 

Green had been warned of these risks, but she also 
knew that "good housekeeping," as one Johnson Con- 
trols doctor puts it, could effectively shield an individ- 
ual against lead. And at fifty. Green had no plans to 
have more children; that risk, at least, she could ignore. 
But then, suddenly, she found herself out of a job — a 
victim of Johnson Controls' new fetal protection rules. 
Company policy until 1982 was to warn women that 
becoming pregnant while working on the line was 
risky — as risky as smoking, ran the message, a weak 
scare at a time when the dangers of smoking while preg- 
nant weren't so widely appreciated. Between 1978 and 
1982, seven women with blood lead levels above thirty 
micrograms per deciliter had given birth. No matter 
that they were few in number, or that scientists dis- 
agreed sharply about the nature of the risk, or that there 
were no reported birth defects: for the company ^203 



198 



VOGUE MAY 1990 



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HEALTH 



those pregnancies were seven too many. Johnson Con- 
trols began rejecting new female hires and transferring 
women off the factory floor at its plants around the 
country. The policy was sweeping, including every 
woman under the age of seventy who couldn't prove 
that she was sterile. 

Ginny Green was made a respirator sanitizer, a 
glorified laundress. She lost the overtime pay that 
line workers regularly earn, and became the butt of 
fertility jokes from all the Archie Bunkers in the 
plant. "I felt I was good enough to work on the line 
for eleven years," she says. "Why take me off now, 
just because of that stupid thing?" 

Green's union, the United Auto Workers, brought suit 
in federal circuit court and lost (the Supreme Court will 
decide whether to hear the case sometime this spring). 
Green never considered sterilization as a way to prove her 
fitness for the job, but other women, both at .lohnson and 
at companies with similarly restrictive policies, decided 
they had little choice. Before American Cyanamid re- 
laxed its fetal protection rules, five women at its Willow 
Island, West Virginia, chemical plant submitted to steril- 
ization — the only form of birth control deemed effective 
by the company. Betty Riggs, then twenty-six and the 
mother of one son, did so because her marriage was 
breaking up and she needed her job. "1 thought there was 
no choice for me, " she says. ' 'That was my only way out, 
to keep my sanity, to keep my family afloat." 

Supporters of fetal protection rules situate themselves 
on moral high ground, as the protectors of generations to 
come; they do not see the issue as one of 
economics or women's rights, or of bal- 
ancing risks. Among the fifty thousand 
lead-exposed workers that Johnson Con- 
trols company doctor Charles Fishbum 
estimates having seen during his quarter 
century of practice, he recalls just one 
' 'damaged child' ' of a mother with a high 
blood lead level, a hyperactive young- 
ster, and Fishbum can't be absolutely 
sure that this was a result of the lead expo- 
sure. But the potential for harm, doctors 
agree, is surely there, and those who ar- 
gue for keeping women out of high-lead 
environments regard any risk greater than 
zero as too great. "One child bom devel- 
opmentally disabled is a very, very grave 
injustice to that child, and that is a moral risk ... we can- 
not countenance ourselves," Jean M. Beaudoin, health, 
safety, and environmental control manager for Johnson 
Controls' battery division, testified at a hearing for a 
woman denied a job at the company's Fullerton, Cal- 
ifornia, plant. Would we grant mothers the right to 
take away their child's curiosity? Do they have a 
right to starve a child's brain? In this view, for a 
woman to insist on her right to make batteries be- 
comes a selfish pleasure, morally indistinguishable 
from her maintaining a crack habit. 



For supporters 

of fetal 

protection, 

working while 

pregnant 

becomes a selfish 

pleasure, akin to 

doing drugs 



But the workers on the line know that the world is not 
free of risk, and they defend their right to choose the 
risks they are willing to take. They work these jobs be- 
cause, like Ginny Green, they have had their children; 
or they are not intending to become mothers; or because 
they intend to stop assembling batteries, bringing down 
the level of lead in their bodies, before becoming preg- 
nant. Compared with the realistic altematives for such 
women, filing forms in an office or collecting a welfare 
check, these jobs bring double and triple the income 
and deliver better health care. 

"Employers who bar women would sacrifice the in- 
terest of living children and adults for questionable 
gains for potential fetuses," says the ACLU's Joan 
Bertin, who has been battling fetal protection policies 
for a decade. "Women usually worry about reproduc- 
tive risks at work a lot more than the boss does. And 
they certainly are better equipped to decide whether 
they should stay or go. ' ' 

University of Wisconsin law professor Carin Clauss, 
who argued the Johnson Controls case in Chicago, is 
more blunt: "Ifthese policies stand, women will be put 
back in a bubble." 

Who's Worth Protecting 
Don Penney and his wife, Anna May, both used to work 
at the Johnson Controls plant in Middletown. Delaware. 
They wanted to start a family and had read about how fa- 
thers as well as mothers could conceivably endanger a fe- 
tus through lead exposure. A mechanic, Don often 
worked in high-lead sections of the company. In March 
1 984 he asked for a three-month leave of 
absence to bring his blood lead levels 
down low enough to be reasonably sure 
he'd father a healthy child. 

Leaves were commonplace in the fac- 
tory — Anna May was taking one her- 
self — but Don's request was bluntly 
rejected. Penney filed a complaint saying 
that the personnel director berated him 
for even raising the idea. "If you feel this 
way, quit," he says he was told. 

The same doctors who insist on being 
ultraconservative about female workers 
dismiss the evidence on males as too 
speculative. At high lead levels, sperm 
can become misshapen (as can ova). It 
is uncertain whether those sperm re- 
main fertile and, if so, whether sperm damage trans- 
lates into physically or mentally impaired offspring. 
But that uncertainty exists because so few studies have 
been done; like most of us, researchers habitually look 
to the mother, not the father, to explain birth defects. 

Herbert Needleman, a professor of psychiatry at the 
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine whose re- 
search on umbilical cord blood lead levels and children's 
later development is cited by Johnson Controls, insists the 
company is misusing his findings. "We did not measure 
patemal exposure and thus cannot rule this out as a ► 204 



\'OCi r E M A-i 1 9 90 



203 



HEALTH 



contributing factor," he says. "The position that a given 
level of paternal but not maternal exposure is acceptable 
is without logical foundation and insupportable on em- 
pirical grounds." 

The journal Reproductive Toxicology recently con- 
cluded that "the exposure of men to lead at levels still 
considered 'acceptable' in the industry may be associ- 
ated with significant reproduction-related harm." Ob- 
stetrician/gynecologist Anthony Scialli, the journal's 
editor and an expert witness retained by Johnson Con- 
trols, registered a dissent. "Women," 
he wrote, "have a special place with re- 
gard to lead . . . . " 

While it is a biologically special 
place that Scialli has in mind, the phrase 
echoes tum-of-the-century arguments 
for protecting women workers. A fa- 
mous legal brief filed by Louis D. Bran- 
deis in support of a New York law 
forbidding the employment of women 
for night-shift factory work details the 
hazards: the awful consequences of de- 
privation of sunlight, the high mortality 
rates among night workers, the difficul- 
ty of getting enough rest during the day, 
the dangers that might befall women 
walking home in the dark, the hardships 
of combining motherhood and night work. 

Night work was also hard on men, Brandeis acknowl- 
edged — it robbed them of a real home life and delivered 
them to drink — but the work had to be done by someone. 
"Ignorant women can scarcely be expected to realize the 
dangers not only to their own health but to that of the next 
generation from such inhuman usage. " 

Women needed to save their strength for the next 
generation, the brief contended; what truly mattered 
was the biological imperative. But then, as now, the 
bottom line ultimately determined who was deemed 
worthy of protection. Because there was a ready supply 
of men to fill night-shift factory jobs, women became 
dispensable, but female nurses were too badly needed 
to be eased out. Similarly, today's argument for fetal 
protection comes easiest at companies like Johnson 
Controls, where the presence of women isn't really re- 
quired. (Indeed, an official at one of the large chemical 
companies was reported as saying that the company 
would get rid of women on the shop floor ' 'one way or 
another.") In such firms, the costs fall completely on 
the other side of the ledger, in the specter — so far only 
the ghost of company lawyers' imaginations — of law- 
suits brought on behalf of damaged fetuses. 

Businesses that depend heavily on women workers 
have been much less scrupulous about the dangers they 
impose on the unborn. Silicon Valley high-tech compa- 
nies hire women to clean computer circuit boards with 
poisonous solvents. Companies continue to resist tak- 
ing seriously the contention, still speculative, that the 
millions of women who sit for hours every day at video 



Businesses that 
depend heavily 

on women 
workers are less 
scrupulous about 

imposing 

dangers on the 

unborn 



display terminals are somehow especially vulnerable to 
miscarriage, since neither the women nor the technol- 
ogy can be readily replaced. Cytomegalovirus, a mild 
type of, herpes infection, can be passed from young 
children to pregnant women and then to the fetus, 
where it wreaks awful neurological damage. Although 
a recent New England Journal of Medicine article re- 
ported that the risk of contracting the disease is greatest 
among women who work in day-care centers, no one 
proposes that no fertile women be hired in these places, 
for no one else would fill these jobs. 

Joan Bertin of the ACLU does not be- 
lieve that women's indispensability in 
certain jobs will protect their rights, how- 
ever, or force companies to make their 
workplaces safe enough for all employ- 
ees. Increasingly, women are seen as fe- 
tal vessels first and autonomous beings 
second, she says. And as that view takes 
deeper hold, working women will find 
their choices being dictated — about how 
much, when, and where to work while 
pregnant. "I think you'll see more broad 
exclusions from ostensibly risky jobs," 
Bertin says, "and in some jobs you'll see 
a revolving door. Women will be asked 
to leave jobs when they're pregnant. 
They'll lose benefits, seniority, promotion opportunities. 
This is not benign. " 

A Sea of Risk 
The world is a sea that teems with thousands of sub- 
stances possibly dangerous to the fetus. The sources of 
danger go far beyond the assembly line. They cross the 
sex line, to affect men as well as women, and they leap- 
frog the line that separates work from pleasure. Al- 
ready there are jurisdictions where women who smoke 
crack while they are pregnant are jailed as felons. Sci- 
entists regularly hoist red flags about what pregnant 
women should and should not eat and drink and smoke, 
and about how much and what sort of exercise they 
should engage in. The recommendations, of course, 
keep changing. But in this sense, lead and crack — lead 
and junk food, too — inhabit the same ethical universe. 
The more we know, the more remarkable it can seem 
that any fetuses negotiate the perilous voyage from 
conception to birth healthy and intact. But all that 
knowledge answers none of the deepest questions. It 
only sharpens the value choices: between the claims of 
the generations, between maintaining personal sover- 
eignty and surrendering that sovereignty to those who 
would protect us from ourselves. 

Just how far will we go to make queen bees out of 
women — all in the name of fetal protection? 

David L. Kirp, professor of public policy at the Uni- 
versity of California, is the author, most recently, of 
Gender Justice and Learning by Heart: AIDS and 
Schoolchildren in America's Communities. 



204 



VOGUE MAY 1990 




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TRAVEL 



A town called Zacatecas: tad friend strays far 
from the tourist circuit to discover a secret 
colonial city high in the mountains of Mexico 




ROOFLESS AND OPEN TO THE MOUNTAIN RAINS, THE 

chapel of the San Francisco Monastery taps mournfully 
on the imagination: the monks left sixty years ago, but 
God still lingers. The cloister and gardens, built in 
1572, have just been restored to house a museum of 
Mexican masks, but the keynote remains civilized ruin: 
arches leading nowhere, time-rounded steps, old 
wells, wild topiary, flamboyant lemon and grape trees, 
cactus growing out of the walls. 

Like its monastery, Zacatecas wins the affection of 
travelers not for any one feature or detail, but for its wist- 
ful ambience. The town is a monument to the colonial 
past constructed around an extraordinary number of pla- 
zas, promenades, gazebos, benches, fountains, gardens 
teeming with palm and cypress trees, cast-iron lanterns 
topped with dragon heads and archaic fmials, and streets 
designed for leisurely strolls. Old men in sombreros and 
cotton jackets walk with their hands clasped behind their 
backs like Chekhovian gentry. 

The Zacatecans, unconcerned with truckling for the 
tourist dollar, are polite in that exquisite fashion which 
discourages intimacy. Even their cars observe a stately 
gavotte, orchestrated by a preposterous number of traf- 
fic police: four men with whistles at one intersection, 
bouncing and spinning in clockwork unison. Such re- 
serve is the hallmark of mountain people everywhere, 
and the Zacatecans — pocketed in the Sierra de Zacate- 
cas mountains 375 miles northwest of Mexico City and 
eight thousand feet above sea level — save their breath 

for climbing the steep flag- 
stone streets. Aside from the 
policemen's whistles, the 
loudest noises in the streets 
are the soft coaxings of the 
vendors who carry on their 
heads trays holding dough- 
nuts the size of hubcaps. 

While some Mexicans re- 
vile the Spanish conquista- 
dors — one of Diego 
Rivera's famous murals in 
Mexico City's National Pal- 
ace characterizes Hernan 
Cortes as misshapen, ►210 

The courtyard of La Quinta 
Real hotel in Zacatecas, TOP, 
built around a former 
bullring; pastel-washed 
colonial doorway, FAR LEFT; 
sculpted baroque facade of 
the city's pale pink 18th- 
century cathedral, LEFT. 

V O G I' E MAY 1990 




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BAUSCH 
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209 


_i 



TRAVEL 



green-skinned, and ratlike — 
Zacatecas acts as grave chate- 
lain to its colonial heritage, a 
wealth of post-Columbian ar- 
chitecture in camera stone that 
shades from gauzy quail' s-egg 
pink to dull furnace red. 

The town is popular chiefly 
with Mexicans, who last year 
composed 92 percent of the 
275,000 visitors — a figure 
that will shoot up in years to 
come. Two five-star hotels 
opened in 1989 (one. La 
Quinta Real, features huge 
bathtubs and 
great views 
into the old 
bullring it's 
built around), 
and three addi- 
tional tourist 
hotels are un- 
der construc- 
tion. But the 
town's tourist 
bureau, run by 
the improbably 
named Victor 
Hugo, still isn't quite equipped for foreigners. The En- 
glish walking tour pamphlet offers such commentary as 
"Just across street we find THE BAD NIGHT PAL- 
ACE building from the 18th century that got its name 
from a miner's legend." Uh-huh. 

Indeed, the few Americans 1 met seemed oddly dis- 
tanced from Zacatecas. On the cable car to the Cerro de 
la Bufa summit overlooking the city, I was squeezed in 
with fourteen middle-aged Americans on a tour. As we 
floated above the pink and white city — a 1969 law en- 
sures that landmarks are restored only in those colors — 
the conversation, in its entirety, went like this: 

"Look at all that washing." 

"Yep." 

"It looks so clean." 

Pause of several minutes. 

"Mercy, but that's a lot of washing." 

La Bufa takes its name from the Basque term for a 
wineskin, which the summit is supposed to resemble. 
From the bluff you can see the whole city, and beyond, 
a ruffle of dull green hills tracked by arroyos and gaunt 
cattle that graze among the nopal cacti. Atop La Bufa is 
a sleepy museum commemorating Pancho Villa's victory 
over President Huerta and his federales at Zacatecas in 
1914. There's a good chance it will be closed no matter 
when you arrive — like most of the town's museums, its 
hours are impressively at variance with the printed sched- 
ule. (The siesta here is an expansive and rather capricious 
concept. ) Also atop La Bufa are tourist shops with souve- 



Street views of Zacatecas, 
CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: old man in 




nirs less horrible than most, with the pos- 
sible exception of a highly touted 
buttocks-shaped "Zacatecas" bottle opener. 

The pleasures of Zacatecas are vertically integrated: 
near the cable car's base station you can also take an el- 
evator (often broken) five hundred meters below the 
earth into El Eden Mine. Zacatecas is the northernmost 
of central Mexico's famous silver cities; the Spanish 
established their first mining camps here in 1548 after 
the Zacateco Indians unwisely showed them a few sil- 
ver nuggets . By the early eighteenth century , Zacatecas 
was producing 20 percent of Mexico's silver, and the 
state of Zacatecas still has sixty-four working mines. 

El Eden, which employed six thousand workers at its 
peak, was closed in 1950 because of flooding in the 
lowest of its seven levels . As you scramble about on the 
dark, rickety catwalks swaying above the copper green 
water, you realize why the miners prayed so fervently 
at the shrine of Santo Nifio de Atocha. Santo Nino, lo- 
cated on the mine's third level, seems to have been 
stone-deaf; on average, two or three miners a day, 
many of them children, died from falls or silicosis. 

Accordingly, the mine has its legend illustrating the 
perils of greed. It's the story of Roque, who found a 
huge nugget of silver and gold on the first level. He re- 
turned the next day to take the rock home, discovered it 
was gone, began a frantic search, and was killed by a 
falling boulder. Yet Roque's soul continues to haunt 
the mine, searching for his lost fortune. On the wall of 
the Silver Sky Chamber you can see his calcined im- 
age — or rather, you can see a nebula of white ^212 



210 



\ O G U E MAY 1990 




A 
LITTLE 
LYCRA! 




A 
LOT OF 
ALLURE. 

Intriguing. The way an 
invisible touch of Lycra* 
enhances fabrics. Now, softer. 
More fluid. More drapeable. 
Not hugging the body, but 
skimming it. Today it's a lot 
more alluring with a little 
touch of Lycra* spandex. 








travel 

GUIDE 

Where to Go 

1 D MEXICO: General 

information on Mexico and 
Zacatecas from the Mexican 
Government Tourist Office. 

2 □ ST. CROrX: Brochure on all 
three U.S. Virgin Islands, 
including St. Croix's special 
package, "5 Will Get You 7". 

Wliere to Stay 

3n MAHNTALAin BAY HOTEL 
& BUNGALOWS, 

Kohala Coast, Hawaii 
4D LAQirasrrAREAL, 

Zacatecas, Mexico 
Sn RADISSON HOTEL, 

Zacatecas, Mexico 

Touring and Transportation 

6 □ ABERCROMBIE & KENT: 

African safaris and tours. 
?□ BRITISH AIRWAYS: 

Complete tour information 

for East Africa. 
8 □ FRENCH CRUISE LINES: 

Cruises along the Saone and 

Rhone rivers. 
9n KENYA AIRWAYS: 

Schedule and travel 

information for Kenya 
ion MEXICANA AIR: Flight 

schedule and rates, plus a 

fact sheet on Zacatecas. 

Please check the brochures you 
would like to receive and return 
this coupon to VOGUE, May 
Coupon, P.O. Box 1606, 
Riverton, NJ 08077-7206, 
Before September 1, 1990. 
Please enclose $1.00 check or 
money order to cover processing. 
Offer good only in U.S A and 
Canada. Allow at least six weeks 
for processing. 

NAME 



ADDRESS 
CITY 



ZIP 



STATE 

We're sorry, but VOGUE cannot 
answer any personal questions or 
requests. 



TRAVEL 



spots. My guide, Antonio, explained that Roque's face is in one 
place and his skull in another. Uh-huh. 

Antonio concluded his spiel by warning that the legend holds 
that if a visitor finds thp gold and silver stone and doesn't share it 
with his guide, his face (and skull, presumably) will end up on 
the wall in place of Roque's. Tip your guide. 

On Thursday through Sunday nights the mine operates a disco 
reached by a train that plummets down the mine shaft at thirty 
miles an hour, everyone whooping. On the night I went, the 
doors, supposed to open at 9:30, didn't budge until 1 1 :00, when 
enough shivering would-be merrymakers had gathered to make 
it worthwhile. Inside a low, craggy cavern, the waiters wear 
miner's hats, the playlist is straight from New York's World, 
and the sound system is monstrous. 1 spent most of the evening 
pensively eyeing the support beams. 

Troll-kingdom disco aside, the town js lonely and still at 
night, illumined by a huge cross on La Bufa and an incandescent 
glow from the spotlights inside the city's cathedral. The cathe- 
dral's famous baroque facade — feverishly carved to show Christ 
and the apostles in tutelary positions, crowded by flora, fauna, 
cupids, and whimsical filigree — draws most of the photographs, 
but I was taken by the church's odd grace notes. I liked that the 
weather vanes on the two cupolas pointed in different directions. 
1 liked the unusual absence of blood-spattered crucifixes. And I 
liked that the statue of Senora de los Zacatecos, the city's patron 
saint, showed her wielding an elegant black walking stick with a 
gold knob. I especially liked that no one, not even Victor Hugo, 
knew the provenance of that stick. A pleasing mystery. 

Victor did proffer the information that the tum-of-the-century 
Calderon Theater was considered one 
of the three most elegant and comfort- 
able in the provinces of Mexico. You 
don't have to imagine that elegance: 
the theater has been beautifully re- 
stored and once more accommodates 
an occasional traveling show. Bronze 
warriors uphold the lamps that light 
the stairways, and still in place are the 
old wall sconces, plush crimson seats, 
three balconies supported by slender 
white pillars, a tear-shaped chan- 
delier, and on the ceiling, a billowy 

Boucher-esque painting of a muse plucking her lyre. In the 
second-floor hallway, a large wooden plaque celebrates the 
city's poets laureate — distant figures, their verses lost to his- 
tory, their only legacy the musical chiming of their names. 
The theater palpably evokes an era of gas jets, waistcoats, op- 
era glasses, and bare shoulders turning at the perception of a 
brightening glance. 

Zacatecas's other remarkable building is the Pedro Coronel 
Museum, a former eighteenth-century Jesuit college that now 
houses the collection of the late Zacatecan artist. Like many 
regional museums it is eclectic and haphazardly curated (with 
works attributed to '"William Hoggarth" and '"Max Er- 
nest"); fortunately for the museum's visitors, Coronel was 
rich and had exquisite taste. He had an eye for the blithe, the 
childlike, in objects ranging from African masks to Egyptian 
sarcophagi. One of the finest works is a stone head of a ^214 



In Zacatecas, 

a law ensures 

that landmarks 

can be restored 

only in pink 

and white 






212 



\ 0(, IE M A V 1 9 90 



Dl AN NE BEAUDRY 



%^' 





/^/(^ yilQ^J^^ 



TRAVEL 



smiling Buddha from Thailand's artis- 
tically vibrant Sukhothai period. The 
other highlights are a series of doodly 
Miro lithographs and whimsical Pi- 
casso prints. (Indeed, Coronel's own 
paintings, visible here and at the near- 
by Francisco Goitia Museum, owe a 
large debt to Miro's colors and Picas- 
so's simian, multi-faced women.) It's 
an excellent way to see Picasso — 
alone in a vaulted hallway overlook- 
ing a courtyard where trueno trees 



flicker under the bright, quick sun. 

After exhausting the museums, 
there isn't much to "do." A good 
place to begin doing nothing is the 
Cafe y Neveria Acropolis near the ca- 
thedral. Though the service is glacial- 
ly slow, they have great cappuccino 
with cajeta, a goopy caramel syrup, 
and the walls are decorated with an- 
odd form of folk art: customers have 
painted their saucers with dried Turk- 
ish coffee grounds. These miniatures 




ANYTHING ELSE IS.U-NTHINKABLE 



are a fair census of what's on the 
minds of Zacatecans: lots of views of) 
the cathedral, lots of bullfighting 
scenes, lots of Christ portraits, one! 
conquistador, one Che Guevara, one 
Einstein, one Michael Jackson. 

One evening outside the Elektra 
electronics store I saw a large, re- 
spectful crowd on the street watching 
Robocop flicker simultaneously on 
nineteen television screens, but that 
sort of thralldom to technology was 
rare. Though the town has several vid- 
eo stores and the Gonzalez Ortega 
market offers gourmet foods and chi- 
chi leatherwork of the kind found in 
East Hampton, most of its citizens are 
poor and follow traditional ways. 
Crowds are more common at the two 
pink-dirt soccer fields at the edge of 
town, the bullring on Sunday after- 
noons, and the billiard parlors where 
dour teenagers play carambola, a 
game requiring one red and two white 
balls and judicious caroms involving 
all three balls. At dusk in General Enri- 
que Estrada Park, built around an old 
aqueduct, the swallows shriek at top 
volume like demented bats, but after the 
bird chorus moves offstage, dozens of 
young lovers come out to lean against 
the trees or recline on the benches, em- 
bracing with balletic ardency. 

In the surrounding streets that crook 
into the hillside, you find children 
kicking plastic soccer balls or racket- 
ing down the flagstones on homemade 
wooden skateboards. Dogs lie magis- 
terially on every street corner. No one 
hurries. Even a graffito near the 
church atop La Bufa — Pensamos en 
limpieza ayuda nos ("We think that 
cleanliness helps us") — is sweet and 
serene. 

On Privada de Merceditas street, I 
stood beside a chalked hopscotch 
course left by children who'd an- 
swered the dinner bell, and wondered 
what it is that saddens the visitor to 
such happy towns. Perhaps the unself- 
consciousness, the insularity of that 
happiness. Perhaps, too, its precarious- 
ness. I admired the Zacatecans for po- 
litely ignoring me. When they start to 
pay too much attention, what we came 
to look for will be gone and the conquis- 
tadors, invited guests this time, will 
have won again. • TRAVELS 216 



214 



VOGUE MAY 1990 




AVAiLAHl AT ^tODORF GOODMAN AND NEIMAN MARCUS 



'^ 



1 



TRAVEL NEWS 



By Richard Alleman 





St. Croix summer 

To prove Ws bock in business alter the 
ravages of Hurricane Hugo, the U.S. 
Virgin Island of St. Croix is offering a 
very attractive off-season deal: from 
May 1 to December 15, most of the is- 
land's newly refurbished hotels and re- 
sorts will give visitors two free nights for 
every five they book. Under this "5 Will 
-Get You 7" promotion, a week's stay at 
a deluxe property like the Comiorant 
Beach Club comes to an unbeatable 
$500 per person, sharing a double 
room. See your travel agent or poge 
212 for further information. 



Cruising through France A great way to pack a 
lot of France into seven days is on one of French 
Cruise Lines' brand-new trips along the Saone and 
Rhone rivers in Burgundy and Provence. Sailing 
weekly between Macon and Avignon from now until 
October 27, FCL's M/S Arlene stops at Lyons, 
Vienne, Toumon, Viviers, and Aries. Not a barge 
(the usual mode of tourist transport in this region), 
the French-crewed Arlene is a 100-passenger riverboat 
with cruise-ship comforts. Prices range from $1,350 
to $1,550 per person; call (708) 824-4577 or see 
page 212. Pictured ABOVE: a bridge on the Rhone. 




Butlers on 
the beach 

For that serious 
splurge, consider 
the new bungalows 
at the Mauna Lani 
Bay Hotel on the Big 
Island of Hawaii. 
Each has an ocean- 
front setting, private pool, above, Jacuzzi, cordless phone, 1 
VCR, CD player, even a choice of linen, cotton, or satin sheets! 
But best of all is the service: a butler meets you at the airport,] 
unpacks and presses your clothes, serves drinks and meals. Bun- 
galow guests may also plan their menus directly with the hotel! 
chef. Rates for up to four adults and two kids: $2,000 to $2,500 a| 
night. Phone (808) 885-6622. 

Palazzo per tutti 

Good news in Venice: the fifteenth-century Palazzo Vendramin,\ 

BELOW, is being restored by its next-door neighbor, the Hotel 

Cipriani, and will open this July with nine sumptuous 

apartments. Offering guests the privacy of a country house plus\ 

the run of the Cipriani, the Palazzo Vendramin has rates that 

range from $340 for a double room to $1,120 for the graruiest\ 

suite; these include breakfast, open bar, and a 30 percent 

discount on Cipriani food and drinks. Call (212) 839-0222. 



For the^^^B^^^w*^'o/video 

crowd, Fendi's cool little coses stash 

those topes you can't leave home 

without. The cassette carrier costs 

$115; the video version is $200. 




216 

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It's cool. Sparkling. And so special, it's unlike anything you've 
' ever tasted. We took a splash oj Bacardi n) rum, a touch of sparkle, 
and luscious natural fruit juices. All deliciously blended into 
a new taste as light as an island breeze. 

That's Bacardi Breezer, in Jour inviting flavors, each with its own 
little touch oj paradise: Calypso Berry Caribbean Key Lime, Island Peach, 
Tropical Fruit Medley Available in convenient 4-packs. 

BACARDI AND THE BAT DEVICE ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF BACARDI 4 COMPANY LIMITED © 1990 BACARDI IMPORTS, INC MIAMI. Ft RUM SPECIALTY 4%-5 1% ALC BY VOL 



FOOD NOTES 



Monet's artful way with food 

Claude Monet's love of food and entertaining is 
apparent from his classic paintings Le Dejeuner, Le 
Dejeuner surl'herbe, and Les Gaieties. He also kept 
meticulous cooking journals of recipes collected 
from friends and restaurants. Now Claire Joyes, the 
wife of Madame Monet's great-grandson, has 
chosen the best of them for Monet's Table (Simon & 
Schuster). Joyes also provides a glimpse into the 
artist's disciplined but gracious lifestyle at his be- 
loved Giverny. Monet adored picnics, fish — espe- 
cially pike from his own famous pond — and Veuve 
Clicquot champagne. Lunch was always served at 
11:30 so that he could 
take advantage of the 
afternoon light; he 
never entertained at 
dinner, because he 
rose at dawn. The rec- 
ipes — adapted by 
Joel Robuchon of Par- 
is's Jamin — include a 
bouillabaisse from 
Paul Cezanne, petits 
pains from Jean Mil- 
let, the banana ice 
cream always served 
at Christmas lunch, 
and the beautiful vert- 
verf, a green cake fla- 
vored with pistachios. 
The book is illustrated 
with reproductions of 
the artist's work as 
well as original menus 
and glorious photo- 
graphs of the artist's 
house at Giverny. 



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Monet's Still Life with Melon, 1 876, above, and the 
artist's menu for the wedding of friends in 1902, LEFT. 






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Richard Krause was among the first of the 

California restaurateurs to hit Manhattan with 

the avant-garde Batons in the early eighties, 

followed by the acclaimed Melrose. Now he has 

opened the Rose Cafe at 24 Fifth Avenue. 

Curried oysters with cucumber sauce and 

salmon caviar are on the menu, along with such 

wonderful new creations as duck and venison 

chili with homemade tortillas and rich linguine 

with rabbit. The grill is faultless, the desserts 

divine, the tab breathtakingly reasonable. 



Greater British dining 



For a decade the British have insisted that it is possi- 
ble to eat as well in their cities as in the more re- 
nowned culinary capitals, but it took a long time for 
anyone to believe them. Now, however. Sir Clement 
Freud, former member of Parliament, 
gastronome, and grandson of Sig- 
mund, has written The Gour 
met's Tour of Great Britain 
and Ireland (Little, 
Brown). The beautifully 
photographed book in- 
cludes profiles of thir- 
ty restaurants and 
well-illustrated reci- 
pes from each. From 
London there's the 
jewel-like Rue St. 
Jacques, which, says 
Freud, boasts the 
country's best wine 

218 




list, a beautiful series of tiny dining rooms, and a 
sublime mango parfait. Le Gavroche, 'Mn a class of 
its own," was the first British restaurant to be 
awarded three Michelin stars. Farther afield, the 
grand Inverlochy Castle calms our 
fears of Scottish haggis with 
glazed Loch Linnhe prawns 
and mousseline of queen 
scallops. In Devon, the 
gracious Gidleigh Park 
offers monkfish with 
mustard and cucum- 
ber sauce. Although a 
well-written travel 
guide, this is above all 
a superb cookbook. 

A chocolate dessert 
from Hintlesham Hall in 
The Gourmet's Tour of 
Great Britain and Ireland 

\ O G V E M A Y I 9 9 



Lowest tan 

Lowest 

nicotine. 






''The taste 
that's rightr 






Img.tar 
0.1 mg. nic. 











King Size Soh Pack: 1 mg. "tar", 0.1 mg. 
nicotine av. per cigarette by FTC method. 



SURGEON GENERAL'S WARNING: Cigarette 
Smoke Contains Carbon Monoxide. 



© The American Tobacco Co 1990 



^Iw*. 



When I was bom, 
my Aunt Alexandria commissioned a statue in my honor. 



At seven, she taught me how to yodel. 



At sixteen, she showed me the pyramids. 
(From a hot air balloon.) 



For my graduation, she bought me a Waterman. 



If you have good taste, she explained, 
you can get away with anything. 




tens write. A Waterman pen expresses. For more than a century, this distinction has remained constant. In the precise, pains tak 
tooling, for example. In the meticulous balancing. In layer upon layer of brilliant lacquers. In accents gilded with precious metal. 
Those who desire such an instrument of expression f) will find Waterman in a breadth of styles, prices and finishes. 



m 



WATERMAN 



PARIS 



Marshall Field's 



© 19X9 Waterman Pen Con 



Saks Fifth Aveni 




LIVING 

Editor: Laurie Schechter 

Madame de Pompadour sparked 
a romance with rococo 

in the eighteenth century 
and is doing so again today 

"THE PREVIOUS GENERATION SAW HER AS A COURTESAN. I SEE 

her as a career woman," says Penelope Hunter-Stiebel of Madame de Pom- 
padour. "She was both extremely feminine and extremely strong and effec- 
tive. She was quite a woman." 

In celebration of Lx)uis XV's official mistress, Hunter-Stiebel has orga- 
nized the exhibition Louis XV and Madame de Pompadour: A Love Affair 
with Style, at New York City's Rosenberg & Stiebel Gallery from May 3 
through June 1 5 , focusing on the rococo period . "In France in the eighteenth 
century, theirs was a very sensuous art. That's what rococo was all about. 
Madame de Pompadour was anything but frivolous. She worked hard to 
bring gaiety to the chambers of power. Her style was perfectly comfortable, 
rich but not overwhelming, very life enhancing," says Hunter-Stiebel. 

Indeed, the determinedly pretty, decidedly feminine style of Madame de 
Pompadour is undergoing a revival, evident not only in a growing taste for 
eighteenth-century antiques, porcelains, and other bibelots but in con- ► 222 



Casa Verde fabric, top, from 

Parence House. ABOVE: Francois 

I Boucher's 1758 portrait 

of Madame de Pompadour. 

' RIGHT: A Louis XV-style vignette 

created for Vogue with 

furniture from Newell Art 

Gallery and hand-painted silk 

and tapestry pillows from 

Charlotte Moss, the Ralph 

Lauren Home Collection, and 

Julia Gray. Needlepoint rug 

from Charlotte Moss. Flower 

arranger on side table from 

Lexington Gardens and Blue 

Aves plate from Bergdorf 

Goodman. Angels fabric from 

Christopher Hyland. All NYC. 

\OGUE MAY 1990 




LIVING 




4. A Louis XV mantel 
from William Jackson 
with porcelain monkeys 
from Mottahedeh, 
Italian candlesticks 
from Thaxton, and a 
reproduction of an 
18th-century plate by 
Robert Hovilond. Rose 
topiaries from Ronaldo 
Maia. Eighteenth- 
century engravings 
from Stubbs Books and 
Prints. Nineteenth- 
century tole wo 
$conce from Lexington 
Gardens and Phoenix 
wallpaper from 
Boussac. All NYC. 



temporary interpretations of the ribbons, frills, fringe, bright pinks, 
and floral motifs associated with the period. Not one but two sump- 
tuous film versions of Les Liaisons Dangereuses have undoubted- 
ly had something to do with the rise of rococo. Luxury and a bit of 
frivolity have a fresh appeal. 

Osborne & Little has created a new line of rococo-inspired fab- 
rics, including one called Pompadour, while Christopher Hyland's 
Angels fabric is a more contemporary version of the putti and flour- 
ishes so popular in French chateaus. A pile of silk and velvet cush- 
ions can transform any room into an eighteenth-century salon, and 
elaborate versions are being produced by everyone from Charlotte 
Moss to Ralph Lauren. And for those who despair of finding the 
perfect Aubusson, chaise a la reine, or tole candelabra, a variety 
of artisans, including Mario Penati and Ronald Jonas, are hand- 
painting cloths and executing elaborate upholstery. 

Contemporary designers are also feeling the lure of the 
rococo. The Splash chair from Dialogica gives a new 

1. A Louis XV candelabra in the exhibition. 

2. Philippe Starck's modern rococo-style 

Teatriz club in Madrid. 3. Dialogica's 

Splash chair covered in Pompadour 

fabric by Osborne & Little, both 




twist to the feminine side chair, and even PhiHppe Starck 
has turned to rococo gilding for his newest design, the 
Teatriz club in Madrid. The ultimate proof of Madame de 
Pompadour's appeal may be the fact that the rising French 
society decorator Jacques Garcia has been hired to re- 
create her historic Chateau de Champs — in Texas. 
Decorating Editor: AMICIA DE MOUBRAY 

5. A reproduction Louis XV sofa from Frederick P. 
Victoria, a fernery from Newell Art Gallery with flowers 
by Ronaldo Maia, and an antique Aubusson from Stark 
Carpet. Aluminum, cast bronze, and scrap metal chair by 
Linus Coraggio, all against a backdrop painted by Mario 
Penati. Upholstery by Ronald Jonas with fabrics from 
Clarence House and Scalamandre and pillow from 
Christopher Hyland. 6. A bouquet by Robert Isabell for 
Vogue evokes the spirit of Madame de Pompadour. 
7. A Louis XV gilt bronze clock and a drawing by J. B. J. 
Pater in the apartment of a rococo collector. All NYC. 



"*' - 













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SEETHE FUTURE 

WITH THE NEW 

ARCHITECTURE OF 

BEAUTY. SWEEPING 

PERFECTION FROM 

A BRUSH WITH DEPTH. 

COLOR PERFECTION 
THAT'S CASHMERE-RICI 

CASHMERE-SOFT. 

rREATMENT PERFECTION, 

FOR THE WOMAN 

WHO WANTS MORE 

FROM A MASCARA 

THAN JUST 

LUSH LASHES. 

CHRISTIAN DIOR 



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Cdvin 




UNDERWEAR 



i 



\0GIE 

POINT OF VIEW 

summer fashion special 

The fashion bell tolls . . . and it tolls for black. Long the dark, rich, economical noncolor of the 
counterculture (even in the dead of summer), all-consuming black (right down to the shoes 
and accessories) has now become the common refrain of anyone and everyone wanting to 
look chic. But no longer. Out of the spring collections emerges white: white on white, white 
on navy, white with uncommon texture — with sequins or a certain unexpected stretchiness. 
White with a built-in ability to repel heat and look as cool and collected in the city as it does in 
the African bush. "White is the happiest alternative to black," says Isaac Mizrahi, who claims 
he's continuing the theme right into fall. Because of its intrinsic delicateness, he calls white 
"one of the great symbols of modern luxury." Rifat Ozbek, who jostled the fashion industry's 
senses by showing his entire collection in white, says he is just trying to mine the collective 
subconscious. Even within fashion, priorities have changed and designers must go beyond 
the merely practical — to the inspirational, Ozbek says. "People are talking about health and 
the environment. White is clean and refreshing, perfect for the new decade." For Michael 
Kors, white's just one more step in the evolution toward color. "We came from a dark winter 
into a spring filled with beiges and neutrals," observes the designer. "Strangely enough, 
white, not brights, is the most shocking thing you can wear.". . .Another break from black: 
the Pucci look, now in its revival stage. While vintage pieces of Pucci's signature kaleido- 
scopic swirls are fast becoming collector's items, the new shirts, pants, and scarves hold their 
own attraction (as proved by fashion editors who attended the recent collections dressed in 
head-to-toe Pucci). Pucci's dazzling splashes of magenta and green are expected to influence 
modern designers' approach to pattern and print right into fall . . . .Also making its presence 
felt: lace. While its most radical transformation comes in the guise of a coat, a shirt, a pair of 
shorts, lace in just minor quantities (as a handkerchief, a pair of shoes, edging for a dress) adds a 
subtle feminine feeling to any outfit. . . . As legions of pretty young things in Milan and London 
take to the streets in a look stolen from American exercise wear — in dance leotards, ski parkas, 
hiking shorts, and Timberland boots — designers here are upping the ante by taking those famil- 
iar pieces and making them chic. Running shorts turn up in lace, and Chanel-style jackets slip over 
leggings — all at very affordable prices. . . . Also moving into focus — three great summer accesso- 
ries that have overcome their utilitarian past: the shorter trench coat, a way to add pattern and 
color; the broad-brinuned hat, now in soft pastels with feminine touches of velvet and chiffon; 
and the tote bag, in a wardrobe of looks from Pop Art designs to classic leather. 

VOGUE MAY 1990 227 





Kenya's the setting for a 
summer shov^ of v^hite. Worn 
dazzling or unadorned, it's 
designers' first choice. j 

Photographei> Hans Feur^r ' 



Named after the 

movie with a similar 

title, the Africa Queep 

ferries between 
mainland Kenya and 

Funzi Island, the 

romantic location for 

this story. On board: 

Tony Duckworth, who 

runs the Funzi Island 

Fishing Club, and 

model Christy 

Turlington. Her whites 

by Marc Jacobs for 

Perry Ellis. Cotton 

pique jacket, about 

S420. Skirt, about 

S200. Bergdorf 

Goodman; Dayton's, 

Minneapolis; 
Hudson's, Detroit. Hat 
by Hat Attack. Travel 
to Kenya provided by 

British Airways. 

Details, more stores, 

travel information, 

last pages. 



Fashion Editor: 
Grace Coddington 






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takes the edge off lit 
even in tlie wilds of 
Africa. OPPOSITE PAGE 



camp, toothbrus^^ 
becomes a les 
water conservati( 

less conservative 

approach: pajamas i 

silk. Lingerie by 

Fernando Sanchez, 

about S370. Bergdor 

Goodmon; Neimon 

Marcus; Lisa Normat 

Lingerie, Santo 
Monica CA. Anothei 

morning ritual: 

Guerlain's Sublicrem: 

No.1. THIS PAGE. A 



glamorous take on i 
the sundress — in 
cotton pique. By 
Azzedine Alaio, abot 
$1,270. Alaia New 
York; Caron Cherry,' 
Coconut Grove FL; 
AlaVa chez Gallay, 
Beverly Hills. In thisi 
story: hair, Didier 
Malige for Jean Loui- 
David; makeup, 
Marie-Josee 
Lafontaine. Details, 
more stores, 
last pages. 



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Two approaches to 

summer style with 

equal panache: one 

covered up, the other 

decidedly uncovered. 

THIS PAGE: Azzedine 

AlaVa's bare top with 

a brief pleated skirt. 

Bodysuit, about $615. 

Skirt, about $545. 

Both at Neiman 

Marcus. Bodysuit at 

Barneys New York; 

Caron Cherry, Bal ^ 

Harbour FL. When it's 

too hot to wear a lot 

of makeup, the 

solution: Mascara 

Parfait with Cashmere 

in Black Onyx by 

Christian Dior. 

OPPOSITE PAGE: 



A loose, easygoing, 

single-breasted suit in 

an unexpected 

fabric — a viscose 

that's as stretchy as 

the fabric used in 
exercise unitards, but 

much softer. By 

fHelmut Lang, about 

$1,350. Barneys New 

York; Gallay, West 

Hollywood CA. Details, 

more stores, 

last pages. 




Torn-of-the-centory 
British colonial dress 
inspires today's ideal 

summer suit. Ralph 
Lauren's example — on 

Christy Turlington, 

who's relaxing in one 

of the Funzi Island's 

thatch-roof guest 
tents: a shawl-collar 

jacket and narrow 

pants, both in silk. 

Collection by Ralph ' 
Lauren. Jacket, about 

$980. Pants, about 

$450. Bergdorf 

Goodman; Polo/ 

Ralph Lauren, Dallas, 

Denver. Another 

Lauren creation that's 

destined to become a 

classic: Safari 

perfume. An exotic 
mix of unusual florals, 
Safari comes in a cut- 
crystal bottle. Details, 
last pages. 




tropical whites 



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dressing room, THIS 

PAGE: Turlington in a 

silk chormeuse robe 

that's lightweight 

enough for the 

tropics. By Go Silk, 

about S300. Bergdorf 

Goodman; Ultimo 

Ltd., Chicago; Go 

Silk, San Francisco. 

OPPOSITE PAGE: 



Another impromptu 

scene: the Funzi 

Island camp mascot — 

a Jack Russell 

terrier — takes a leap. 

Turlington holds her 

own in a circle-skirted 

sundress, backed with 

crisscross straps. 

Vogue Pattern #2479. 

Cotton fabric by 

Rosen & Chadick. 

Details, last pages. 



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tropical whites 



The prop for 
summertime: o foce- 

shading brood- 
brimmed hot. Echoing 
the texture of the 
natural straw: a 
jacket in waffle- 
weave cotton pique. 
By Marc Jacobs for 
Perry Ellis, about 
$420. Bergdorf 
Goodman; Dayton's, 
' Minneapolis; 

ion's, Detroit. Hot 
»y Hat Attack, 
tther great prop: 
( deep shade of 
ouge Amethyste, 
from Loncome's 

Hydra-Riche 

hlydrating Creme 

Lipcolour. Details, 

[ more stores, 

last pages. 




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Ws boosted with a rich 

surface treatment, from nubbly 

weaves to glittering sequins 



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Africa is tamed by sea 
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breezes, but the 
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g flocks of rare birds 



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[FT: Native village on Funzi Island, 
eeping cool — in an Isaac Mizrah 
dress, about $1,195. Barneys New 
Ultimo Ltd., Chicago. Funzi Island 
ng Club's floating bar. Mangrove 
reflections. Hot-weather whites — 
line Ala'ia's bodysuit (about $615) 
and pleated skirt (about $545). 

with birds. Primitive dhow under 
full sail. Chow bell at Funzi Island 
Fishing Club. Classic tropic 
ook: white silk from Collection by 
Ralph Lauren. Jacket, about $980; 
, about $450. Bergdorf Goodman; 
olo/Ralph Lauren, Dallas, Denver. 

Details, more stores, last pages. 



241 



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Sequins add a 

surprising, glamorous 

detail to swimwear. 

THIS PAGE: A strapless 

suit by Ana 

Gasparini for 

Brazilian Splash. 

About S204. Bergdorf 

Goodman; Everything 

But Water, Orlando 

FL. OPPOSITE PAGE: 

Combining the 

practical with the 

fantastic — a sequined 

tank suit — by 

Ozbek. For Stendhal 

fans, their first sun 

block with SPF 15 (it 

also has grape-seed 

extract for less 
irritation): Stendhal 

Ecran Hydro- 

Protecteur. Details, 

last pages. 



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I D^jekaboo straps. 

About $1,260. AlaVa 

New, York; Coron 

Cherry, Coconut 

Grove FL; AiaVa chez 

Gallay, Beverly Hills. 

THIS PAGE: More 



white — a treetop 

display of egrets 

roosting in 

mangroves. Details, 

more stores, 

lost pages. 





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^P saw Ivana Trump in London a couple 

I years ago. She had just taken over run- 
ning the Plaza and was whisking round 
Europe in search of chefs, carpets, chan- 
deliers, soft furnishings, china. Hit-and- 
run tours. She held a lunch with Anton 
Mosimann, former superchef to the Dorches- 
ter, at his own new place. 

Mrs. Trump pulled up in a limo. She had 
two or three men with her who looked like 
aides or bodyguards. They're not a common 
sight in London. And she was wearing a sable 
coat. Now, sable coats in London are a very 
uncommon sight indeed. Nobody wears fur — 
nobody. You get spat at. Harrods has closed 
its fur department. Mrs. Trump herself 
doesn't wear fur much at all now. But then she 
did. With her entourage, she wafted into the 
restaurant. The maitre d' gave the group a 
general smile and said, "Mr. Mosimann's 
lunch? Through the restaurant, right to the 
back, along the corridor, up the stairs to your 
left, blue door." 

"Mrs. Trump is here," said one aide, 
choosing his moment. 

"Yeah, ho-kay, ' ' said the maitre d' , unim- 
pressed. "For Mr. Mosimann's lunch? 
Through the restaurant, right to the back, 
along the corridor. . ." He slung a thumb. 
Her aide again said, very New York, very 
tight-lipped: "Mrs. Trump is here. This is 
Mrs. Trump." 

The maitre d' looked blank, and another 
bunch of people flurried into the lobby to take 
up his attention. "For Mr. Mosimanns 
lunch?" he said. "Through the restaurant, 
right to the back. . ." Mrs. Trump's aides 
reached the end of their rope. "Give me your 
fur, Ivana," said one. She slipped out of her 
coat, and her aide shouldered his way to the 
front of the small and crowded lobby, leaned 
over the desk, and said, "This is Mrs. 
Trump's sable." The maitre d', looking ha- 
rassed, shoved it on a hanger. Ivana sailed 
through the restaurant, right to the back. 
Whence I followed. 

I was amused by the little clash at the desk. 
Laid-back London meets fast-track New 
York. I was quite prepared to dislike Mrs. 
Trump intensely as I sat down to lunch. Bil- 
lionaire's wife, OK? All that money and fur, 

"I have five pairs of jeans and I can't remember 

the last time I wore them," says Ivana Trump. 

Here, decked out in something that's more her 

style — but softer: a silk Yves Saint Laurent 

Couture dress — which she "loves" because 

"most American women will never dream of 

wearing such a wonderfully extravagant design." 

In this story: hair, Maury Hopson for 

Louis Licari; makeup, Vincent Longo 

for Pipino-Buccheri. Details, last pages. 



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Ivana Trump is really like. 

Here, an exclusive interview 

with Vicki Woods 



Fashion Editor: Andre Leon Talley 
Photographer: Patrick Demarchelier 



r 



• I no longer like the 
puffball look," says 
Ivana Trump of the 

I dresses the 

' paparazzi snappeo 
her wearing around- 
the-clock last year. 
Her preference: "a 
more columnar" 
shape Here, two 

j takes on the look. 

' OPPOSITE PAGE: A Simple 



white silk and crepe 

gown covered in 
daisies, by Valentino 
Haute Couture. Drop 
earrings. Jewels by 
j Demner, NYC. 
Shalimar Gloves, this 
PAGE A burst of 
color — Christian 
Lacroix Haute 
Couture's hand- 
painted and 
embroidered Lycra 
top (which doubles 

as an ornate 

swimsuit), worn with 

a dramatic silk skirt. 

Jade cuffs, Verdura, 

NYC. Details, 

last pages. 



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the real ivana 



Ivana J? office door opened an 
She looked fifteen years younger tb 



and aides with their New York attitude. I imagined that she'd 
say a few words, chat to Anton Mosimann, and leave. In fact, 
she rose to her feet, took immediate control of the room (thir- 
ty or forty people), and gave a cracking speech, in rapid-fire 
bursts, about the Plaza. She talked money, housekeeping, 
marketing, restoration, management, staffing, interior de- 
sign, personalities. She then took questions, many direct and 
personal, and talked about "the Donald" and her pride in his 
achievements, the children, the money, the clothes, the 
yacht, the houses, and being a working mother. She was soar- 
ing, unassailable. It was very professional. She looked im- 
maculately turned out in a gray wool and velvet dress. She 
looked self-assured and she looked her age (thirty-eight 
then), "happy in her skin" as the Irish say, and she sang for 
her supper. 

The older and snootier of the male guests murmured to 
each other, "My God, what a little powerhouse, eh?" in that 
patronizing English way. In surprised tones the women 
guests said, "Isn't she great? I really liked her, didn't you?' ' I 
said it myself. The whole thing was wildly impressive. From 
the sable down. 

That was then; this is now. 

^^ saw Ivana Trump at the Plaza after weeks and weeks of 

■ headlines so astonishing that it's hard to believe, look- 
ing back, how much space they took. I had coffee first in 
the Palm Court: lush, gilt, baroque, high-ceilinged, and 
purely joyful. What Ivana has done at the Plaza is quite 
formidable. She took a raddled old heap and saw right 
through the chipped varnish and grime to the well-bred bone 
structure beneath. Ivana spent money, effort, and time on the 
Plaza's makeover. She oversaw every detail herself. Chande- 
liers from glass factories in Czechoslovakia, hand-knotted 
rugs from India, tapestries from Gobelins. She seized every 
opportunity to raise the Plaza's profile by offering the gilded 
spaces for New York's fashion week, for trunk shows, for 
charity bashes, for parties. And she succeeded in turning the 
hotel right around. The Palm Court is bliss to be in. I watched 
a CEO-type in handmade shoes entertain three Japanese for 
breakfast. He couldn't take his eyes off the candelabra. "Are 
those electric bulbs or real candles?" he demanded of his 
waitress. 

"Electric bulbs, sir." 

"Well, how in the hell do they flicker?'' She laughed and 
told him. (The CEO-tyj)e wouldn't have had this conversa- 
tion two years ago. He'd have been at the Carlyle.) 

Upstairs, the executive offices are very plain: a warren of 
small, unluxurious rooms, windowless (except for Ivana' s), 
crowded with assistants and busy, busy, busy from way be- 
fore 8:00 A.M. There were no male aides, except a uniformed 
guard at her outer door. Her personal assistant Lisa Calandra 
shot out to greet me, managing to look both controlled and 
hunted by demons at the same time. Lisa is fabulous, thin as a 
rake and smart as a whip. Uhhh! What a day! Wiiat a week! 
What a year! I got the impression that Lisa could give out high 



drama about all this, but I'd have to pull her fingernails out 
before she'd say one word that might harm Ivana. She'd be 
great at the White House. 

Eventually, Ivana's office door opened, and a fragile, deli- 
cate, beautiful blond said, "Hello." I didn't recognize her, 
though a suitcase full of press clippings from across the world 
should have prepared me. I was ready for a softer, younger 
face (remembering her famous quip: "Donald wants me to 
stay twenty-eight and I've told him it's going to cost him a lot 
of money"), and I was ready for the quieter, prettier makeup 
and looser hair, but I wasn't prepared for the fragility or her 
sense of being hunted. Hounded. It made her look young and 
vulnerable. She looked about fifteen pounds thinner than I re- 
membered; also fifteen years younger. It was astonishing. 

She took my hand to shake, and steadied it with her other 
hand. She introduced me to Eleanore Kennedy, wife of her 
lawyer. I said, "Let's start with how on earth you're coping 
with all these horrible headlines? All this press? All this pub- 
lic comment on your private life?" 

There was a short silence. I don't want to be overdramatic, 
but it seemed to me that blood ran down the walls. Ivana 
turned to Mrs. Kennedy; Mrs. Kennedy turned to me, and 
Ivana said, "I can't talk about — about my private life." 

Since New Year's, Mrs. Trump has had no private life. Her 
private life has been taken over by the American press and the 
American public, utterly and completely. Mrs. Trump is used 
to living in the public eye, but not like this. Not like this. Mrs. 
Trump is well used to talking to the press, but she hasn't 
talked to the press since Christmas. Mr. Trump talks to the 
press, though. He's a proper chatterbox, Mr. Trump is. 

"I can't talk about — about — any of that," Ivana said. I 
looked at the wall. There was an oil painting of Donald 
Trump (red tie, dark suit, sulky look), signed T. McDonald. 
It looked as though it had been painted by numbers from the 
Newsweek cover of Mr. Trump that was framed on the oppo- 
site wall (red tie, dark suit, sulky look). On Ivana's window- 
sill were scores of pictures of Donald Trump (blue tie, yellow 
tie, cream tie, dark suit, sulky look). I cast about for neutral 
topics, and as she talked, she calmed. 

We talked about her work, which meant we talked about 
the Plaza, about the "brain sessions," the fact that "anyone 
can walk in and give me a problem, ' ' the 8 15 guest rooms, the 
English-theme suites, the bridal suite, the Frank Lloyd 
Wright suite. It made me uneasy to talk about the Plaza. Ivana 
said "we" a lot. For most wives, the personal pronoun of 
choice is "we." Sometimes, you have to accept that one day 
it may be "I." It sounds strange, "I." You have to roll it 
around in your mind and get used to it. "I" live here; what 
shall "I" do next? But meantime, there's a hiatus — a gut- 
churning, painful, hideous time where "we" is damaged and 
"I" isn't ready. The personal pronoun for this period is a 
floundering "who" — who am I? who am I going to be? 

We talked about clothes. She's passionate about clothes, 
knowledgeable and interesting. She picked her way through 
the American designers, emphasizing their different 






iagile, beautiful blond said, "Hello, 
emembered; it was astonishing 



?? 



strengths like an articulate fashion 

■ditor. She praised things from her 

riends, acknowledging the fact 

hat they are her friends: Carolina 

Icrrera's slim silhouettes, Caro- 

\ ne Roehm's apres-ski, Bi 
Class's embroidered sweater, Os- 

ar de la Renta's colors. She raved 

ibout America's young designers: 
Rebecca Moses' silky beige T-shirt 
ind lace jeans and Carmelo Pomo- 

loro's shearling ponchos. 

In America, you cannot 
Wear fur anymore like be- 
fore," she said. "So 1 took 
two of his wonderful ponchos 
to Aspen, in olive green and vi- 
olet, to wear instead of fur. ' ' 

She then ran into a paean of 
praise for Victor Costa, de- 
scribing how he's "despised by 
designers" for copying, but his 
clothes/i/. "If a girl can't afford 
expensive gowns she can still 
have a wonderful dress for three 
hundred dollars," she said. She 
described how she watched Mr. 
Costa naughtily sketching away at 
Yves Saint Laurent two years ago. 

As the ladies applauded a certain 
dress, he immediately started to 
sketch!" And she waited heart in 
mouth for the YSL minders to throw 
him out. 

Mrs. Trump's delivery is rapid 
and her accent is endearing. She told 
me that Oscar de la Renta's last col- 
lection was spectacular with its "Ur 
stones." Oh, earth tones! She also 
said that although she normally ate 
sensibly, she was just like anyone 
else when it comes to chocolate. 
"Once a year I have a very big carv- 
ing, the chocolate carving," she 
said, "but then I eat a whole block. " ' 
And? "And the carving disappears." Oh, right. She speaks 
Czech, Russian, and German. A little French. "But if you 
speak Czech, you speak Polish, and if you speak Russian, 
you can speak. . .Yugoslavian; I have a Yugoslav house- 
keeper and we speak fluently together. ' ' 

In her office are clusters of photographs of her children, 
daughter Ivanka, a little beauty ("she has the same personal- 
ity as me, the same energy") and both boys, breathtakingly 
blond. Ivana took her younger son to her hairdresser Louis Li- 
cari . ' 'This is the color I want ! ' ' she teased , pointing to Eric ' s 







Other places 

other times, clockwise 

FROM TOP: Last year 

with Donald Trump 

and Mayor Koch; 

at the Metropolitan 

Museum Costume 

Institute galas in 

1987, 1989. 



cottonball head. 

So Monsieur Louis cuts Eric's 
hair, does he? I asked. ' 'Certain- 
ly not," she said. "I cut it," and 
laughed at my obvious disbelief. 
People like me cut their chil- 
dren's hair, people like Ivana 
Trump surely pay fifty dollars at 
ritzy salons. "You have to have 
the very sharp scissors," said 
Ivana, snipping at her bangs with 
her fingers, "and I also have 
the — the scissors like a cutting 
comb? The comb where 
you run it through 
the hair and it. . . " 
"Thins," I said 
from, experience. 
"Yes. Thins." 
Having children of 
my own, I feel very 
protective about chil- 
dren. Starving chil- 
dren, abused children, 
my friends' children, 
anybody's children. 
Children of billionaires, 
whatever. Motherhood 
makes you nosy, bossy, 
interfering. It also makes 
you a judge of other moth- 
ers. The idea of Ivana using 
"the very sharp scissors and 
the cutting comb" on Don- 
ald Jr. , Ivanka, and Eric sud- 
denly made me feel better 
about them. 

It can't be easy bringing up 
the children of billionaires. Or 
rather, it can be too easy, be- 
cause you can simply devolve the job to others . Ivana Trump 
honestly seems to understand the scale of the task. I believe 
she gives her children love, thought, care, energy, and time. 
She has two nannies, both Irish, one older and one youn- 
ger, which doesn't seem inordinately excessive: I know fam- 
ilies with two nannies for only one little ewe-lamb (Duchess 
Fergie, for example, before her latest). Ivana eats breakfast 
with her children before she goes to her office, and leaves 
work about five to look over their homework and have dinner 
with them around seven. 

"They know, of course, that they have bigger homes than 
other people. And ... a private plane, but I try to let the chil- 
dren earn what they have; they have to do errands around the 
house. I concentrate on the manners all the time. We enter- 
tain, and they mingle with the guests and they are se- ^324 



251 



Trump says she 

never thought she 

would look good in 

yellow, "but when I 

decided to wear it, 

it became one of my 

favorite colors." this 

PAGFj^A decollete silk 

crepe even'ng dress 

by Vgien+lno Haute 

Couture. Pin by Fred 

Leighton Ltd., NYC. 

Louis XV banquette 

from Bern^i'-r' Steinitz 

et Fi'S. OPPOSITE PAGE: 

More Va'pntino 

Haute Co"jt;jr<?, more 

yellow -in a wool 

and silk gabardine 

suit. Shell earrings, 

Fred leighton Ltd., 

NYC. Jade cuffs, 

Verdura. NYC. 
luggage and tote 

bag by Fendi. 
Details, last pages. 



^ 







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Prints by Pucci — 

yesterday and today. 

OPPOSITE PAGE: Marilyn 

Monroe, circa 1962. She 

asked to be buried in a 

Pucci. THIS PAGE: 1990— 

Pucci continues his 

kaleidoscopic color 

scheme. Leggings, about 

$75. Blouse, about $275. 

Emilio Pucci Boutique, 

NYC. Far left: one of his 

fabrics. Details, last pages. 



Fashion Editor: Carlyne Cerf 

de Dudzeele 

Photographer: Penn 



IKs back. It's Pucd— that dazzle-the- 
eye clash of vivid color and pattern 
Ithat signals the end of an era of black 





255 




no need for a Pucci to carry a label: those delirious 
colors and dizzy patterns scream its identity better 
than any signature. As Emilio Pucci, the creator of 
this high-visibility printed clothing, has modestly 
noted, "Gaiety is one of the most important elements I have 
brought to fashion." And gaiety has been his hallmark for 
more than forty years. Since the late 1940s, Pucci has fear- 
lessly created uninhibited color schemes, mixing fuchsia 
with geranium, turquoise with yellow — and at times combin- 
ing up to twelve boggle-the-eyes colors in a single wild 
scramble of pattern. At one time, the Pucci empire was so ex- 
tensive that his prints could be found on everything from lug- 
gage and rugs to rain hats, handbags, playing cards, palazzo 
pants, and pantyhose. 

The Pucci behind Pucci is an aristocrat, Emilio. the Mar- 
chese Pucci di Barsento of Florence, who can make the 
unique claim that he is "the first member of [his] family to 
work in one thousand years." But Pucci has more than made 
up for his ancestors' lack of job-related experience. A scholar 
and expert skier, Pucci served in the Italian parliament and air 
force and has a Ph.D. in political science. 

For an exceptionally self-directed man, Pucci's start in the 
fashion business was pure serendipity. Vacationing in St 
Moritz in the late 1 940s, Pucci lent the ski outfit he 
had designed for himself to a woman who was 
then photographed by a fashion magazine. 
Lord & Taylor placed a large order for those 
stretch ski pants, parkas, and sweat- 
ers. And in 1949, the handful of re- 
sort clothes he designed for a visiting 
friend (she'd lost her luggage) be- 
came a runaway hit on the shores of 
the Mediterranean. Pucci was 
swamped with orders and set up shop at 
home in Florence, in the ancient Palazzo 
Pucci. There, seamstresses labored in 
frescoed rooms while models paraded be 
neath a centuries-old masterpiece of a mar- 
tyred saint. 

By the 1960s, boutiques selling Pucci were 
scattered from Monte Carlo to Palm Beach. If 
there had been a "Me and my Pucci" advertise 
ment created at that time, Jackie Kennedy or Eliza- 
beth Taylor might have answered the call. (At her 



In the 1960s, putting on 
Pucci was a Hollywood 
habit. THIS PAGE, 



clockwise from top: 
Elizabeth Taylor slips 
hers under a fur coat. 
Emilio Pucci and his 
prints. Lauren Bacall in a 
man-tailored shirt. Ann- 
Margret models the 
"baby doll" look. 
OPPOSITE PAGE: Lycra 
leggings, about $75. 
Cashmere and silk 
sweater, about $350. 
Bag, about $275. Emilio 
Pucci Boutique, NYC. 
These pages: hair, Oribe 
for Oribe at Parachute; 
makeup, Laura Mercier. 
Details, last pages. 




White, tt 
coolest col( 
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Classic summer 
staples reinterprete 

^with the body in 
mind, this page Isaac 
Mizrahi's linM^Ht. 
Jacket, about ^00 
Skirt, about $310. 
Bergdorf Goodman. 

OPPOSITE PAGE - 

Azzedine AlaTa's little 

dress, about $900 

Alaia New York: 

Caron Cherry, 

Coconut Grove FL; 

■ Linda OM»|rThese 

pagesln^B^m 

McKnight fo^Biniel 

Galvin at La Coupe: 

/makeup. Vincent 
LongoTipr Pipino- 
Buccheri Details, 
more stores, last pages 



1 




Fashion EdKor: 

Grace Coddington 

Photographer: 

Patrick 
Denu^elier 



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Adding interest to 
familiar shapes: 
patterns that are cut 
* out to reveal the 

skin. THIS PAGE: Ttte 

sleeveless dress — 

with crisscross back. 

By Mary Ann Restivo. 

about $300. Saks 

Fifth Avenue; 

Montaldo's; Neiman 

Marcus. A new 

Ibrmula for a familiar 

fragrance: the 

moisturizer, Ysatis 

" de Givenchy's 

Perfumed Beauty 

Cream, opposite page: 

One of designers' 
favorite pieces — the 
trench coat — in one 
of designers' favorite 

fabrics — lace. By 

Isaac Mizrahi, about 

$1,660. Bergdorf 

Goodman. Details, 

last pages. 




The way to dress up 

casual pieces so 

they can become city 

bound; with longer, 

unconventional 

jackets, opposite 

PAGE: The dress is 

skintight, the jacket 

is a trench coat. 

Dress by Isaia NYC, 

about $120. Fertility, 

NYC; Clare Feldman's 

Allure, Coral Gables 

FL; Gal lay, West 

Hollywood CA. Trench 

by Donna Karan New 

York, about $530. 

Bergdorf Goodman; 

Bullock's. THIS PAGE: 

The new suit — with 

shorts — gets pulled 

together with a 

hooded cotton 

canvas jacket. 

Bodysuit (about 

$615) and shorts 

(about $420) by 

Azzedine Alaia. Both 

at Ala'ia New York. 

Shorts at Gallay, 

West Hollywood CA; 

Alaia chez Gallay, 

Beverly Hills. Jacket 

by Michael Kors, 

about $330. 

Bergdorf Goodman; 

Hirshleifer's Etc., 

Manhasset NY; 

Neiman Marcus. 

Keeping skin soft: 

L'Oreal's new 

Plenitude Action 

Liposomes Targeted 

Daily Skincare. 

Details, more stores, 

last pages. 




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A study in opposites: 

the straight-and- 

narrow body-covering 

pantsuit. . .and the 

bare curvy bra and 

skirt. THIS PAGE: CalvJn 

Klein's perfectly 

tailored washed silk 

jacket and pants. 

Jacket, about $450; 

pants, about $265. 

Saks Fifth Avenue; 

Marshall Field's; 

Calvin Klein Store, 

Dallas. OPPOSITE PAGE: 



A play of textures — a 
lacy shirt, knit bra, 
and quilted skirt. 
Shirt by Comp'ice. 
Hirshleifer's Etc., 
Manhasset NY. Bra 
by Azzedine Alaia, 

about $285. Barneys 
New York; Galiay, 

West Hollywood CA; 
Alaia chez Galiay. 

Beverly Hills. Skirt by 
Geoffrey Beene, 
about $690. At 

Geoffrey Beene— His 

World, NYC. A 

lipstick in a pretty 

shade ta heighten 

the femininity of 

lace — ^The Nakeds 

LipChrome in 3. 

Details, more stores, 
last pages. 





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Estee Lauder (n 
Givenchy Haute 
Couture on the lawn of 
her Palm Beach estate. 



Editor: 

Andre Leon Talley 

Photographer: 

Oberto Gili 



i^ - ' 



As her vast beauty 
empire heads into the 
nineties, Estee Lauder 
is still on top, still 
mixing perfumes. 
Julia Reed reports. 

all about 




* 'The way to do it is to spray the room and then walk through 
it. " Estee Lauder is explaining the proper way to experience a 
scent. "I never use an atomizer. It's not natural." She ought 
to know. Lauder, who made her first perfume almost forty 
years ago, has been called the only true American "nose," 
but she insists that she actually sees her fragrances. The fra- 
grance Estee was bom from the light of two crystal chande- 
liers reflected in a glass of champagne; Azuree was meant to 
conjure "a golden girl basking on a Mediterranean beach." 
Aliage, she says, was inspired by the cool green of a palm 
leaf. Indeed, from the inception of the groundbreaking Youth 
Dew in 1953, Estee Lauder's famous nose — and her eyes — 
have proved their worth. 

Today she presides over a private company worth an esti- 
mated $2 billion. The business she started with a few pots and 
her uncle's recipes now accounts for almost 40 percent of the 
upscale cosmetics market and is moving into the nineties with 
a prescient position in Eastern Europe and a dynamic new 
president, Robin Bums. Estee Lauder receives royalty and 
heads of state; she has been awarded the French Legion of 
Honor. Last year. The Wall Street Journal included her in the 
centennial edition's "Gallery of the Greatest" — with no less 



than Alexander Graham Bell and Walt Disney. Clearly, she is 
a woman who can do anything she wants. Yet here she is on 
her Palm Beach patio pouring oils into test tubes: "I am al- 
ways working on a fragrance. ' ' 

Her staff says she is most inspired in Palm Beach, and it is 
no wonder. Her house is dazzlingly white, a gracious porti- 
coed mansion with a stunning view of the Atlantic and interi- 
ors the pastel colors of after-dinner mints. Here in the brilliant 
Florida light, she inspects new packaging and tries out prod- 
ucts on her mah-jongg group. On her patio, as she's done 
countless times before , she mixes her wares for the photogra- 
pher. As in all her residences, she keeps trays loaded with vi- 
als and droppers, essential oils and bottles of "bulk," the 
base of every fragrance. Mixing and pouring, she pushes 
aside the blotters that are the tools of her trade and never takes 
a single note — "I just smell." Done, she energetically rubs 
our palms with this latest creation and watches our eyes to see 
ourreaction. "That's how I know if I've got a winner." She 
does. "It's going to be very sexy," she says of her next scent. 
" I want a Youth Dew 1 992 . " 

In 1 953 the assertive Youth Dew, first introduced as a bath 
oil, revolutionized the American fragrance industry and cata- 
pulted a reasonably selling skin-care line into a wildly suc- 
cessful business. Until then perfume was meant to be subtle 
and romantic, something to be given by an admirer and kept 
on a dressing table. But women could buy Youth Dew them- 
selves for $8.50 a bottle, pour it in their bathtubs, and smell 
good all day. Lauder sold it by the gallon, used it to promote 
her other products, and repackaged it as a perfume. ' 'Middle 
America," says a former employee, "went bananas." But 
Gloria Swanson wore it too, as did Joan Crawford, who 
claimed she snared her fourth husband with it, and Dolores 
Del Rio, who bmshed it through her hair. Once, at a store ap- 
pearance, Lauder was asked if she was the Youth Dew lady. 
When she said yes, the woman said her husband had left her 
four times, but each time Youth Dew had brought him back. 

The success of Youth Dew, still a strong seller without the 
benefit of advertising, spawned another twenty scents, in- 
cluding Estee, a favorite of Pat Buckley and the Duchess of 
Windsor; Private Collection, promoted as Mrs. Lauder's own 
private fragrance; the best-selling Beautiful; and Knowing, 
which made its debut with Paulina Porizkova in 1988. But the 
fragrances are more than profit makers for the Lauder empire. 
Fragrance, like a proper hat and gloves or a beautifully made- 
up face, is a facet of the well-bred image Estee Lauder has so 
relentlessly cultivated for herself and her company. From the 
beginning, her ads were aimed at the woman she calls "the 
elegant achiever," the woman whose closets were "impec- 
cable," whose guests were "pampered," and whose chil- 
dren were "well behaved. ' ' Not for Estee the hard-edged sex 
appeal of Charles Revson's Fire and Ice girls. The Estee 
Lauder models, epitomized by fifteen-year veteran Karen 
Graham, were the image of cool, upper-class refinement. 

In real life, the two women who most closely defined the 
image were her great friends — and longtime idols — the 
Duchess of Windsor and Princess Grace, whose royal airs 
she has taken to with alarming ease. In front of the cam- 
era — lighting candles, descending a staircase — the grand 
gesture comes naturally. Her poses so often seem to de- 
mand applause that we actually find ourselves giving it. 
"Now," she says, "you see why I wanted to be an ac- 

269 



all about estee 

tress. ' ' She adores to show off the photographs of a hfetime: 
Estee on the polo fields with Charles and Di, Estee and husband 
Joe with the Duke and Duchess, Estee in egret feathers at a 
masked ball with Princess Grace. Maybe it's all that royalty, but 
Beauty Queen, she says, is an overused term. The appellation 
she prefers is Empress. 

The Duchess, Mrs. Lauder tells me, met her for lunch at 
Orsini's one day and changed her gloves twice. Princess 
Grace "never went anywhere without something in her 
hand" — so Estee herself steps out with evening bag in one 
hand, an orchid in the other. Renowned for her clothes, she 
is big on what she calls ready-to-go outfits. "In a pressed 
blouse, a simple suit, a simple hat and gloves," she says, 
' 'you can face anybody walking the streets . ' ' With an inex- 
pensive ready-to-wear dress, she advises shoes to match, 
"a lovely scarf around the neck with a knot to put a pin 
on." Though she says she always packs too much, her fall 
travel staple is a red velvet hat. "That, above all, is the one 
item I ' ve found of infinite use . ' ' 

She delivers her advice with the pushy intima- 
cy of a concerned great-aunt. She is famous for 
teaching people how to achieve her famous 
"glow" (a few drops of Swiss Performing Ex- 
tract, cream rouge with powder or foundation on 
top, and eye shadow applied with the fingertip 
only). "I love making up faces and showing peo- 
ple what to do with their skin. ' ' When she notices 
lines around the eyes of the Vogue photographer, 
she presses her Aramis eye cream into his hand. 
To me she says, rather ominously, "We'll talk 
about your skin later." She is a zealous believer 
in the worth of her own products, and she simply 
cannot stop spreading the word. I tell her my 
mother is a fan of her cosmetics, and I am handed 
armloads of beribboned shopping bags for her. At 
lunch, under the umbrellaed tables outside, we 
eat a ladies' lunch of tomatoes stuffed with tuna 
fish, crackers, ice cream, and Pepperidge Farm 
cookies. "Eat, eat," she says, and we do. She is 
so sure of her own correctness that there seems no 
choice but to let her take care of us. 

When Pat Buckley's son, Christopher, got 
married, Estee counseled her friend to give her 
new daughter-in-law something cherished of 
her own. "Love and trust are wonderful," she 
said, "but don't forget the earrings." One of 
her favorite admonishments is "Remember, 
when a person is talking to you they are only 
looking at your face," and if she thinks she 
can help you, she cannot help herself. 
"Blonds fade out at night, C. Z.," she told a 
startled Mrs. Winston Guest, whom she ad- 
vised to wear more blush. 

Much of her litany is eminently practical. She 
is, after all, the woman who brought the three-minute makeup 
technique to the department-store counter. Until then, women 
paid a fortune for a makeover and spent an hour in a salon. "I 
was a businesswoman, and I brought up two children," she 
says. "Who has time to stand in front of a mirror?" Then there 
is: "Even if you are feeling low, put on lipstick and a blush. It's 
a pickup." And perhaps the most sound advice of all: ^324 




entrance hall with 
Federal sofa; the 
quintessential Palm 
Beach patio; the 
courtyard surrounded 
by a topiary hedge; 
Estee's collection 
of antique silver; 
one of her signature 
place settings; 
Estee at work. 
CENTER A view through 
the living room. 
INSET: Estee strikes 
a dramatic pose 
early in her career. 



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271 




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life. I accept change. People live and then die. You cannot 
hold back time. This quest of yours, I want to tell him, is not dig- 
nified. It's banal: the futile yearning for lost youth. 

But Richard thinks with his senses; he forgets the solid basis 
of things. 

He talks as though smell were easily detachable. But how to 
describe a scent, a fragrance? Things smell like themselves. Pine 
smells like pine, coffee smells like coffee, leather smells like 
leather, a rose is a rose. Smell can be compared only to itself; it is 
inseparable from the thing smelled; it is indeed its essence, its 
identity. If Richard has lost my smell, he's lost sight and under- 
standing of me. 

I can track him now, imperceptible, unseen. On the bus he 
turns his head to a teenage girl in denim. She leaves a whiff of 
burnt ginger behind her, like a plainclothes Hare Krishna, as she 
passes, claims a seat. He descends to the street; so do I. He takes 
a sharp breath. He's got a scent. Leather. He sniffs. We see: 
black boots, black jacket smooth as butter. Oh, she looks tough 
and soft to touch, but it's the smell that counts: pricey and sav- 
age, fetid stockyards mixed with society and country homes. 
And I think, Richard, you must be punished. 

Discipline of course is barbaric unless it leads to correction. 
We must cleanse your senses and start afresh. I say "we" be- 
cause the others will help me, all the sweet-smelling chippies, 
pungent thinkers, fragrant temptresses, hikers with wood- 
smoked hair, natural gourmets with crushed basil at their finger- 
tips. A grown-up Catholic schoolgirl in skirt and blazer, safe and 
fragrant as a cedar chest. An island beauty, emanating cinnamon 
and vanilla, even her sweat an extravagant musk. 

In my angry fantasy they will lure him to me, to the doctor's 
office with its antiseptic smell. "Nasal irrigation," I say. "We 
are civilized people. We'll just. . .flush out your passages." I 
smile. He struggles, his nostrils wide, as I strap him to the chair. 
"You'll smell me yet!" I say, approaching with the tube. 

How did love come to this? 

Where have they gone, the dizzying perfumes of our court- 
ship? Where have they gone, the botanicas that used to offer their 
sacred and magical wares? I take the bus uptown, seeking grace 
relocated. I'm a visitor from a neighboring culture, crossing in- 
visible borders. They have seen my type before, I'm sure, drawn 
inside the shop in humility and despair. I need herbs to bum, to 
drive the evil spirits from my home. Please, I say, help me. Sell 
me an incense to guarantee love. 

He'll come forme, and spirals of smoke will rise from smol- 
dering cones and freshly lit incense sticks. I will have put 
scented oils on light bulbs; fragrance will rise from the heat as 
from a lover's pulse. A foul brew will bubble on the stove. 
While I. . .1 have passed through department stores. I have 
submitted, been anointed, like some priestess or sacrificial 
victim, with every sample spray. 

Richard, you will search your memory for the aroma of our life 
together. Our past. Through clouds of exotic scent you'll try to re- 
member. You'll be sorry you didn't wake up and smell the coffee. 
What have you got now? A cacophony of fragrance, an olfactory 
riot, odor run amok. It's getting late. Where there's smoke, my 
love, there's more than a smell. There's fire. • 



There's a classic appeal to dark red lips and a decollete chiffon 
dress. On the same glamorous wavelength— rich scents such as 
Coco by Chanel, Boucheron, 273 by Fred Hayman, Red Door by 
Elizabeth Arden, Chloe by Parfums Lagerfeld. Dress from Chanel 
laute Couture by Karl Lagerfeld. Details, stores, last pages. 



essence; 



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Perfume evokes different 
moods for different 
people. Lace appeals to 

almost everybody. 
Christian Locroix's gilded 
and jeweled mule for 
Christian Lacroix by Sidonie 

Larizzi. Evan Picone 
Hosiery. Bracelet on his 
right arm, Tiffany & Co. Just 
OS compelling — Cartier 
for Women, Red by Giorgio 
Beverly Hills, Somsara 
by Guerloin, and the soon- 
to-be-released C'est 
Id vie! by Christian Lacroix. 



Scent and sensibility: more 

designer fragrances are competing 
to seduce the woman of style 



Ask Oleg Cassini and he'll tell you. At 
the age of seventy-seven, he has just 
launched a new fragrance. Why? "I 
compare it with the knights pf old. If they 
didn't have a horse, they weren't knights. 
Today, if you don't have a fragrance, 
you're not a designer." Cassini has 
perspective on the subject. He's seen 
styles he created for Jacqueline Kennedy 
in the sixties come back into style for the 
nineties. 

Long before celebrities attached their 
names to scents, designers had 
fragrances. Coco Chanel started 
something in 1924 when she put her 
name on Chanel No. 5. 

Now every designer worth his label 
wants his own fragrance, and many 
designer scents of the past are enjoying 
a renaissance: Lanvin's Arpege (1925), 
Jean Patou's Joy (1930), Christian Dior's 
Miss Dior (1947), Nina Ricci's L'Air du 
Temps (1948), and Robert Piguet's Fracas 
(1948), which is back in stores in an 
unusual, attractive tulle package. 

Imagine the scene in Paris earlier this 
year when Christian Lacroix entertained 
a thousand guests at the Opera Comique 
with dancing bears, a bottle-shaped 
cake, Siamese twins in drag, a well- 
known French ballerina, tap dancers, a 
German singer, and a black-faced clown 
serenading a dancing monkey. What was 
it all about? It was a grand gala to 
introduce Locroix's first fragrance, C'est 
la vie! The American press was invited, 
even though not a drop will be sold here 
before September. Still, the hoopla was 
meant to be memorable because Lacroix 
knows, like so many designers before 
him, that developing a successful 
fragrance can far exceed the rewards of 
designing dresses. 

It all started a couple of decades ago 
when the fragrance habits of American 
women began to change. Traditionally, 
they had used scent sparingly; perfume 
was hoarded for years. Then more and 
more "born in America" fragrances 
appeared, competing with French 
perfumes. 

In 1969 Charles Revson, the founder of 
Revlon, asked Norman Norell to create 
the first American designer fragrance. It 
was an immediate success and the 
beginning of a designer deluge: Pauline 
Trigere (1973), Halston (1975), Geoffrey 
Beene (1975), Oscar de la Renta (1977), 
Bill Blass (1978), Ralph Lauren (1978), and 
Galanos (1979) all introduced scents. 

Next came fragrances from jewelry 
designers. Van Cleef & Arpels was 



followed by Boucheron, Tiffany, and 
Cartier, and many more scents from 
fashion designers: Calvin Klein (1981), 
Anne Klein (1984), Perry Ellis (1985), Liz 
Claiborne (1986), Bijon (1987), Norma 
Kamali (1987), Carolina Herrera (1988), 
Jessica McClintock (1988), Canadian 
designer Alfred Sung (1988), and Arnold 
Scaasi (1989). This year, it's Vicky Tiel, 
Oleg Cassini, and Ralph Lauren, with his 
fiffh fragrance. Safari. Expected soon are 
fragrances from Bob Mackie and 
sportswear designer Adrienne Vittadinl. 

When American women showed how 
much they loved designer scents, 
European designers joined the throng. In 
the last two decades Fendi, Hermes, 
Gianfranco Ferre, Valentino, Emanuel 
Ungaro, Poco Rabanne, Giorgio Armani, 
Pierre Cardin, Paloma Picasso, Jean 
Louis Scherrer, Givenchy, Claude 
Montana, Krizia, Yves Saint Laurent, and 
Karl Lagerfeld all launched fragrances, 
and the number of fragrances keeps 
growing. Chanel now has eight, Yves 
Saint Laurent seven, and Karl Lagerfeld 
four, with his fiffh, Lagerfeld Photo, 
coming out in September. 

With designer fragrances a staple of 
department stores' perfume bars, it 
wasn't long before American scent 
makers came up with another bright 
idea: the celebrity scent. 

The first was Sophia Loren, who 
licensed her name to Coty in 1980, but it 
wasn't until 1987 that a celebrity scent 
really took off — when Elizabeth Taylor 
set the standard for the genre with 
Passion, the best-selling celebrity 
fragrance to date. 

Taylor's success story has attracted 
more and more celebrities to the fickle 
world of fragrance, and it has tempted 
companies, large and small, to offer 
celebrity star status in a bottle. Only one 
celebrity, however, actually owns his 
fragrance — trumpeter Herb Alpert, who 
decided to take his name off Listen, the 
refreshing women's scent he created in 
1988. This year, only two celebrity scents 
hove been launched so for, those of 
Priscilla Presley and Billy Dee Williams. 

Perhaps the marriage of fragrance and 
fashion is destined to outlast that of scent 
and celebrities for the very good reason 
that designers already have a fashion 
image, and their names have an 
immediate appeal for the style-oriented 
woman. One thing's certain. No matter 
whose name is on the bottle, the consumer 
only comes bock for more if she likes the 
smell.— ELIZABETH COLLIER 



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OP POSITE PAGE: Plants died W 
these: River Phoenix does n 

wear leather. He does wear 

cotton. Like 100 percent 

cotton. Like these black jeans 

and this white T-shirt, both 
by Guess? These eight pages, 

grooming by Thorn Priano. 

Details, stores, last pages. 

Photographer: Bruce Weber 
Stylist: Joe McKenna 



dM 



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,/• 



iver Phoenix doesn't want to be a teen hearttlfrob. 

He wants to make movies, play music, and ... 
'ell, maybe save the planet. Vicki Woods visits him 
^ in Florida and shares a vegan omelet 



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28]iL 



iver Phoenix is onls ninetei 
That's the most important tH 
about him. He's been in the m 
ies so long you'd think he'd be older 
now; really knoeking on. like. . .oj 
don't know. Twenty-two or somethi 
But nope. Nineteen. Wholesome i 
tot'u omelet. And as good-looking ai 
get-out. , 

Another important thing is his fu 
name. River Jude Phoenix. All the b 
Phoenixes have Spaceship-Har 
Save-the-Planet sixties names, wi 
their parents (Arl\n and John) cle. ' 
gave a lot of thought to. and now i 
the kids have lived w ith their names 
some years and worn them in a bit. t ' 
suit them right down to the grou 
Rainbow Joan of Arc Phoenix. se\ 
teen, is called Rain; Leaf Joaquin Pf 
nix. fifteen, is calling himself Joac 
these days; Liberty Mariposa Phoi 
(mariposa is Spanish for "butternN 
thirteen, is known as Libb\ ; and Si 
mer Joy Phoenix, twelve, stick' 
Summer. These are great names 
end-credits titling, aren't they? Be 
than. . .Meryl Streep. 

When River isn't making mov, 
he's making music. He lives with 
famil\ in Gainesville. Florida. H 
been to Gainesville'.' Neither ha« 
North central Florida isn't exactl 
tourist hub. being humid. Hat. sp( 
with alligators, and at least a hunc! 
miles from the ocean in any directi 
But it's warm, and Arlyn Phoenix \\ 
the heat. And Gaines\ille (popula , 
ninety thousand and rising ) has thi 
five thousand college students liv 

there. The University of Florida. 

1 

student told me. is about the chea' 
public university in the entire L'n 
States, which is v\hy it's busting al 
seams with crop-headed, athletic-lc' 
ing boys in white T-shirts and bermi 
w ho play football by floodlight until 
early hours of the morning. .Arlyn ?Y 
nix liked the idea of a university td 
when it came time to settle finally, 
cause she wanted plenty of cultural (^ 
cilities for her brood oi children: i % 
music, drama. ^ 

River Phoenix isn't crop-headed ^ 
course. And he doesn't wear bermu< .(ti^ 
He anived at my hotel in his mothi iS 
car wearing a jade green Gap swi '** 
shirt, navy blue long Johns, and tei ^ 
shoes. He's grown since we last ^ 
him (in Running;, on Empty — \i7/i "'"e 
tearjerker). He's now five elc' 



tof u guys don't eat meat 



iS 



eartthrob: 
J gentlemanly modesty is 

ver Phoenix's strong suit. 

Pg osiTE: He dons a tie by 
J thji Yamamoto New York, 
mcket by Paul Smith New 
/ork. Shirt from Polo by 

ph Lauren, this page: River 

id friend Suzanne Solgot. 
'is white cotton T-shirt by 

■mporio Armani. Details, 
stores, last pages. 






("Barefoot!"), slim as a willow, and 
hung with wisps of beard like Florida's 
Spanish moss. He wouldn't shave them 
off, even for Bruce Weber's pictures. 
He didn't have to fatten up for his new 
role in Lawrence Kasdan's / Love You 
to Death . He plays a pizza chef who has 
a fairly off-center Weltanschauung and 
tries to help his boss's wife (Tracey Ull- 
man) attempt to murder her husband 
(Kevin Kline) numerous times. He's a 
lean pizza chef . play ing his age . ( He put 
on fifteen extra pounds for Stand by Me 
because he was fourteen playing 
twelve, and fatter looks younger.) After 
/ Love You to Death comes Dogfight, 
directed by Nancy Savoca. I'm really 
looking forward to it. River plays a ma- 
rine who has a bet with the other guys 
that he'll pick up a worse dog — an un- 
handsome woman — than any of them. 
Thisshould be a real coming-of-age mov- 
ie and the first that he'll have to carry on 
his own. Director Savoca says. "River 
has an emotional weight that other 
young actors just don't have. ' ' 



We went for coffee in 
Gainesville. The teenage 
waitress was a little excit- 
ed . but she kept her cool . " Do you have 
Venezuelan coffee?" No. "Do you 
have carrot juice?" No. "Well. I'll just 
have a double espresso then." he said, 
and promptly ticked away for hours 
about how hyper he felt from the caf- 
feine. I told him he was a pinup even in 
the British teen mags and then immedi- 
ately wished I hadn't. So did he. He laid 
his beautiful head on the table and 
groaned with real embarrassment. "A 
pinup. Oh. God.T wish you hadn't said 
that. A pinup!" He told me about the 
publicity stills that were taken of him 
"when I was younger." You do every- 
thing they tell you, he said. "They 
teach you how to pose, you know; they 
say. 'You have to do it like this!' And 
you tilt your head, and they show you 
how to push your lips out and suck in 
your cheeks. . .oh. oh [groans]. . .and 
then all the outtakes that you never w ant 
to see again in your life go through the 
teen magazines /o;T\rr. Oh. oh [more 
groans]." It was very funny, but he 
meant it. Gentlemanly modesty is Riv- 
er's strong suit. 

River's press so far has been a combi- 
nation of large paragraphs about the 
state of the planet (which can read kind 
of irritating from a fifteen-, sixteen-. 



T- 



d tohi guys don't 



<wN 




C' 



"V 



/ 



:t 



.^ 



River Phoenix ha* a lot to 

•ay about tree*, but a* ooe 

'can %ee, a picture >« worth a 

thousartd words. Rrverr goe* 

natural in >eans by Calvin 

Klein Sport for Mem artd a 

Wack cotton tank top by Calvin 

Klein Men's Underwear. 

Details, stores, last pages. 

2M5 



tof u guys don^t eat meat 



^ ' \0 




seventeen-year-old) and a ""W 
freaky!" examination of his uncon 
tional family. Let's take the family 1 
Arlyn and John Phoenix (him 1 d 
meet — he was in Mexico with Leaf 
quin) had a pretty wacky life until 
got to Gainesville (and compared 
Married. . .with Children mainstr 
America, it's still a tad wacky). 1 
were sixties dropouts, they were oi 
road, they thought LSD was a truti 
rum. they found God, joined a j 
went to South America as missiom 
(River was fluent in both Spanish 
English from age three), had theii 
bies by natural childbirth, believed 
Whole Earth. . .you know. 

Arlyn and John seem to have 
lowed the beat of the sixties drum h 
erthan most, and instead of turning 
eighties yuppies, they've hung o 
there. They are now perfectly reg 
folks, with twenty acres of propen 
few cars, a few bank accounts, a coc 
gardener, a business manager, and 
handsome kids, most of whom art 
tors, but — they do vegetables instei 
drugs now. they don't eat animal p 
ucts. don't waste paper, wear leal 
or overconsume any of the planet' 
sources. They have save THE R.ai.n i 
EST stickers on their cars, and thein 
big dogs, a Doberman-German sS 
herd mix and a full German sheph 
are both vegans. (They don't smell 
sweeter than regular, carnivorous d 
1 might add.) 




Gainesville, Florida, may be 
the last place you'd expect 

to find even the most 
eccentric movie star, but it 
suited River's mom, Arlyn, 
OPPO SITE, because it was a 

college town. Details, 
stores, last pages. 



o River's handsome little h 
from an early age, has been 
of global concerns and the t 
to save water when you flush. Th 
flne. except when you're a Hollyw 
star at the same time and w riters jet 
ask you what you think of God. Hi 
son Ford. Rob Reiner. Sidney Lur 
President Bush, and all those o 
grown-ups. And you've been broi 
up to think for yourself, hold your < 
in conversation, stick up your chin 
talk. So they take it all dow n as if it v 
gospel and you end up sounding li 
real dweeb. River groans again aO 
thought of his early interviews, 
oh. 1 just And them ver> misleadin 
don't recognize myself. . . .1 soi 
kind of like. . . bright boy. teenage ri 
siah. health fanatic. . .uh. Save! 
World. . .hippy-dippy bai 
ground. . .the whole collage rq 
false. It's the terms that are W 






a\ 



a story by louise erdric 



best we 



There've been a million 



great songs written 



about unrequited love. 



But requited love. 



like answered prayers. 



is the kind of thing 



that can make you 



lose your voice 



was a straight- A high school English student working my^ 
way through community college when I ditched it all and 

Iran away with Ricky Zachs, the lead tenor in the Flathead 
Valley choir. My voice was adequate, that's all, but I 
was a fair piano accompanist. Ricky and I formed a duo, 
the Midnite Specials, and through an agency we booked] 
ourselves to play hotel lounges, wedding dances, and live- 
music bars from Oregon to the sad, black, forest towns of up- 
per peninsula Michigan. I was a clear alto. My voice had no 
range, no upstairs, but I knew just how to dress for the spot- 
light and for my weight. I wore zircons on my fingers so my 
hands, on the keyboard, glittered. Home ec had taught me 
where to vertical stripe and where to drape, showed me accent 
points, the tricks of choosing jewelry pieces to draw attention 
toward good anatomical features and divert the eye from oth- 
ers. I was the visual asset, but Ricky's voice carried us. An 
Irish lilt, a touch of Hungarian soul, even moments of clear 
falsetto, it had everything, all of the whole of Europe I used to 
think, a world about which Ricky didn't know any more than 
I did, except he was it, a blend that gave him a haunted, wavy- 
haired look. When he sang "Volare," he was passionate. At 
the same time he was darkly wholesome with his big square 
face and preacher-clean smile. 

I had always been the kind of girl that people called at 
tractive, never pretty; the kind who worked for every bit of 
notice that she got, who never took appreciation for grant 
ed. I was the kind of girl who'd go on a date that consisted 
of six rounds of miniature golf. I fell in love all the time, I 
couldn't help it. Movie stars, rock stars, even faces in com- 
mercials. Football captains, all the assistant coaches, civ- 
ics teachers, then professors. I nursed unrequited affection 
until Ricky Zachs. He'd been one of those I'd worshiped 
from afar, not that he was always handsome. 

The thing about Ricky was he had an ugly childhood. All 
through grade school he was the one the others herded out, the 
skinny boy who'd give up without a fight, cry, tattle, eat dirt. 
Then he blossomed into a hunk. In eighth grade, he joined the 
football team and paid people back. He had no friends, exact- 
ly, yet everyone was awed by him. By the time we were out of 
high school, he'd run the gamut of available girlfriends, 
down to the little swaybacked sophomores. He was at loose 



im 



ends after graduation, working resort clubs here and there, 
then he noticed'my thick blond hair. 

"How come we never got together back in high school?" 
he wondered. "Where were you?" 

I was about the only girl left he'd never taken on a date, but 
I said nothing. I never told him how I'd watched him, just 
wishing. It was luck. I was the last one left and maybe that 
helped. He talked of eloping, not putting up with church and 



r, 



L 



ern 



community bullshit, a wedding, all that. And though I'd al- 
ready planned a Princess Di dress in white satin, with a tiny 
sophisticated diamond of a hat and a long lace train, I figured 
running off might be my best chance to keep him. So we got 
married in Vermillion, South Dakota, by a justice of the 
peace with thongs on her feet, whose house smelled of just- 
canned pickles. 

Requited for the first time, I threw sparks. I felt it. When I left 
home we hid out for a month at the Garden Court in Eugene, 
where Ricky had gone to college. We used my savings, holed 
up in a room with a narrow balcony and pictures of pots of 
flowers on the rough tan walls. The double glass-door win- 
dows looked out on a parking lot. We didn't care. One after- 
noon we got in, exhausted, from a live audition, and sitting in 
our twin captain's chairs, we poured ourselves iced Cokes to 
cool down. We were silent. Actually, the day had not gone 
well. In Ricky's casual refusal to meet my eyes I thought I 
could detect repressed blame. I'd hit a few bad notes. He'd 
had to sing over my mistakes. He stared moodily down at 
the side of the fish restaurant next door. Suddenly, around 
the corner, came a young long-legged blond girl in shorts, 
tanned and tall, carrying a violin case in one hand, a large 
soft drink in the other. 

"That's sweet," said Ricky. I could tell he was wondering 
if she would practice. He was mortally sensitive to noise. 

Behind her, a boy, also carrying a violin, popped over a 
hedge. Then a dozen, some with cellos, and then more girls with 
all sorts of instruments in cases of molded leather. French horns, 
trumpets, tubas, and most ominous of all, drums. 

"It must be some sort of convention," Ricky said uneasi- 
ly. We watched as they came toward us across the lot, laugh- 
ing, swaggering, shrieking, showing off for one another. 
They streamed toward the Garden Court. We heard them on 
the stairs. They plunged up, down, thundered. In their rooms. 
Doors slamming. Out of their rooms. Doors again. 

"No, no," Ricky's voice rose, an edge to it, hysterical. "I 
need my sleep.'' 

Sleep was not mere routine to Ricky but something much 
more vital and elusive. I'd never thought much about sleep 
before I shared it with him. Love was the thing he took for 



granted, adoration. Sleep was the thing he had to court. At the 
desk, he had asked for the quietest room. Walking into it he 
put the bags down and turned his face intently, from side to 
side, checking for the roar of traffic, cries of pleasure from 
the outdoorpool, thumps overhead, orthe whine of television 
from next door. Even in the deepest quiet of the night, howev- 
er, it is true that sleep for him was an attainment. 

I sensed him beside me those first weeks, till I got used to 
it. He'd hum to himself a little, trying out new arrangements 
in his head, or replay the day's tensions, the fights he often 
had with bar managers, arguments that I smoothed over. As I 
dropped off, I'd feel him flexing and relaxing each part of his 
body in a kind of yoga exercise that he had learned from Tar- 
zan books. Sometimes he screwed in foam ear stops and some 
mornings, when I woke, I saw that he'd won his battle only by 
donning a black silk eye mask. He claimed that lack of sleep 
destroyed the timbre of his voice , and whether that was true or 
not, it sure wrecked his disposition. I began, very early on, to 
try and ensure a full eight hours. And so that afternoon in Eu- 
gene, when he turned to me, his sleek brows wild, his mouth 
stuck half-open, I was already thinking. 

As always, we were in the No Smoking wing. He hated 
smoke. Breathing cigarette smoke, he said, was our only oc- 
cupational hazard. 

"Let's move to a smoking room," I said. "They're teens. 
They're not supposed to smoke, right?" 

I could see him weighing the noxious alternative. He gave 
in and that night, in the blessed and stale-odored quiet, his 
nerves soothed by the white noise of a blank station on the ra- 
dio, Ricky fell asleep in my arms. It was such a rare thing, 
sleep overcoming him with his neck crooked at an uncomfort- 
able angle, that I didn't dare move although his head on my 
chest was a weight I had to lift with every breath. 

That night at the Garden Court was a high point. I should have 
known we were heading for a low . The only nature I got to see 
in those days of marriage was landscaping. It comes back to 
me so clear sometimes. Moments. Places. There we were at 
the Knight's Inn, Detroit. I was looking at the boulevard, at 
the plantings around the parking lot and pool, at the way the 
flat yew bushes grew between the clumps of candy-striped 
petunias and yellow snapdragons. I was looking at the soft 
shapes of pines, when I suddenly wanted so badly to just lie 
down. It was midday, the parking lot quiet, but Ricky was in 
our room, in the bed underneath the crossed spears on the 
wall. He was catching up on sleep. I needed sleep, too. but I 
didn't dare go back in the room for fear of waking him. 

The pines were six feet tall, maybe more. Their lowest 
branches touched, forming caves. The cedar bark and shred- 
ded wood spread across the ground beneath looked springy 
and cool. It looked so inviting that I decided, why not? I could 
choose a lawn chair beside the pool and fall asleep in it. No 
one would bother me. Why not the little shadow, the cave un- 
derneath a tree? I stepped carefully around the bright flowers, 
and I stretched out right there. And it was comfortable. 
Outside the greenery, it didn't seem there was a breeze at 
all. Under the tree, though, I felt the sigh of needles, heard 
the singing of some tiny unfamiliar insect, native to Detroit 
I guess. There could have been a bird, a sparrow or some- 
thing. There was the smell of earth, the thick white odor of 
petunias. I closed my eyes. 

289 



In my bones, as I lay there, I felt the traffic beyond the bou- 
levard, the shudder of life. Voices passed, but I felt safe. AH 
around me, leaves ticked and flowers hummed and took in 
light. The world was drunk with light. I was sliding deep into 
the dark. Underneath the chipped bark, below the plastic set 
down so the weeds could not poke through, under the layer of 
broken glass and topsoil and clay gumbo, I pictured a dark- 
ness so total it was a fabric of air. 

I fell heavily and did not wake up until the sprinklers came 
on and soaked the ground. Then, as I stumbled out, back into 
normal life, I realized that Ricky would have been absolutely 
furious if he had seen me, and I was glad he had not. It didn't 
occur to me how strange it was that 1 was sleeping outdoors, 
while inside the motel my husband had two queen-size beds 
to himself, with royal blue vel- 
veteen spreads on them. 

No, the situation did not 
strike me as odd at all. It had 
become normal for me to 
guard Ricky from the world. 

The facts only began to clari- 
fy in Minneapolis-St. Paul, at 
the Thunderbird. I do believe 
that that motel is cursed by In- 
dians. There's a thirty-foot 
chief constructed out of fiber- 
glass in front. That's for start- 
ers. Inside, the place is littered 
with designs. The rubber mats to 
wipe your feet on, the carpets, 
the cocktail napkins, all full of 
squares and diamonds, Indi- 
an-looking. Strange. There 
were a bunch of tired plaster In- 
dians dressed up, enclosed in 
glass. The animals these people lived off were stuffed and hid- 
ing in the rafters, poised to leap down and attack. Foxes, 
wolves, raccoons, squirrels, and wild goats. The night we 
played at the Thunderbird, the lounge was full of families 
bumped off a canceled Northwest flight. You can imagine the 
mood they were in already. Our show did nothing but give them 
a target, a focus for their irritations. 

It was wild, though, the things Ricky tried. He had always 
told me that patter with the audience was his strong suit. He 
started out with a few remarks, talking about his family. "My 
uncle was a deep-sea diver, but he was too polite to last. Met a 
mermaid and tipped his hat to her. I had an aunt, too, an old 
maid. She let the dust accumulate beneath the bed. How come? 
She heard man is made of dust." He got to me, his wife. "She 
wouldn't kiss me last night. Said, 'Honey, my lips are 
chapped.' 'Well,' I said, 'one more chap won't hurt 'em!' 

"You people come here in an airplane? I hate 'em. I stay on 
terra firma. The firma the ground the lessa the terra. 

"Now, seriously, folks . . . . " 

Soon after that, we swung into "Raindrops Keep Falling on 
my Head," "Let's Fall in Love," and "I Fall to Pieces." Then 
Ricky asked the crowd if there were any requests. 

"Harmonize," a voice called from a back booth. There was 
laughter. Ricky shot me a foul look and retorted, ' 'You want to 
hum a few bars?" 

Then it was like we had started some kind of trend, or maybe 

290 



It didn^t occur to me 

how strange it vfas 

that I >Afas sleeping 

outdoors, ^A^hile inside 

the motel my husband 

had two queen-size 

beds to himself 



our airline passengers had got a fright that day and, you know, 
the way you wake up in the morning and a song is going in your 
head and you realize it is a comment on your life, they asked for 
"Listen to the Rhythm of the Falling Rain," "When Autumn 
Leaves Start to Fall. ' ' We kept singing for them, taking requests 
for Falling numbers. I think the emphasis on getting dashed to 
the ground set some kind of tone. Morbid. And when we sat 
down tQ take our break a weird thing happened. Of course, 
Ricky hadn't slept well and I was walking on pins anyway, but 
he looked at me, all critical. 

"Your lipstick's off-center," he said. 
"Oh?" I had my purse. I took out a little lipstick tube with a 
mirror attached. I looked at my lips, applied a touch-up. 
"OK now?" I asked. 

But he didn't say yes. He looked 
over my head, studying a stuffed 
hawk, and spoke in a dreamy 
voice. "It's your mouth, to be 
honest, your mouth is set 
crooked on your face. ' ' 

I was astonished, then hol-i 
low with hurt. 

"Oh?" I said. "Oh, really? 
Is it?" 

Ricky tipped the strong line 
of his jaw away from me. 

"Goes with the rest." He 
grabbed my arm, hauled me up. I 
had no time to react, or maybe I 
was numb. Before I even took in 
his remark properly, I was in front 
of the crowd drawing out the open- 
ing to "Snowbird." And then, that 
night, after we had played until the 
lounge closed and we went up- 
stairs to bed, after I hung up our clothes, turned the covers 
down, and loosened the tight, clean sheets, Ricky slid in and , 
closed his eyes to block out my face. I turned the lights off. The 
night, the air, all was still and very black around us. The room's 
drapes shut out the lights from the parking lot. From time to 
time, we heard other people in the outside hallway. Doors 
closed with hollow, watery booms. Voices dropjjed like stones 
into the hush. 

"Please, ' ' I said. I held my breath as he turned in his slumber. 

The silence deepened. I didn't dare speak or make any 

noise at all. Even the sound of my breathing, the ragged need 

of it, even the rustle of the bed sheets, seemed much too loud. 

Since the day I turned thirteen and my mother let me put on 
makeup, I have never begun my morning without the ritual of 
eyeliner, mascara, blush, and lipstick. The next morning was 
a first. I forgot about it, didn't even check my face and hair in 
the mirror. Ricky was downstairs, eating breakfast. He must 
have slept real good, that meant. After long sleeps he always 
ordered the specials that included minute steaks, hash 
browns, three eggs instead of two. 

After a good night's sleep, after making love, I'd usually 
go downstairs fresh and put together, perfect as I could make 
myself. Ricky and I would sit across the table from each oth- 
er. Everything around us would seem interesting and intense. 
We'd read our place mats out loud, flip through the packets of 



vogue fiction 



sugar. Even the words on the menu would make us laugh. But 
that morning, as I stood in the doorway by the Please Wait To 
Be Seated sign, Icaught sight of Ricky from behind. He sat 
alone at the counter. Clearly, he did not want company. His 
back was hunched over his fo<}d and his elbows were mov- 
ing, up and down, up and down, pumping at his work. He 
ate like a mechanical horse, everything about him given 
over to the one task. 

I turned and walked out. Drumbeats, a wailing kind of far- 
away sound, Indian-theme music came from the loudspeak- 
ers. It was a music so foreign to me that I could not tell 
whether it was meant to be sad, happy, or something more 
complicated. I sat down in the lobby, next to a shallow pool 
laid with blue tiles. Under the ripple of the spotlighted water, 
coins glinted, a hundred of them, two hundred, each one repre- 
senting a person's wish. Glass cases lined the wall, floodlit and 
labeled with names and dates. It was just me and a hundred dol- 
lars' worth of small desires. I couldn't stand my thcjughts. I took 
out a quarter. I wanted to get my wish all right. 

"I hope lightning strikes and bums this place down," I said. 

When I threw in my coin the ripple from the little splash 
spread and continued, moving outward, widening all day. 

I'd seen Ricky mad. In his anger once, he'd loomed toward 
me and I was afraid that he was going to hit me, but his hands 
stayed at his sides. I never thought he would hurt me, not real- 
ly. But I was wrong. We stopped on the way to Billings, in 
one of those wayside parks. I made Ricky a sandwich of 
meat, cheese, and bread. I was cutting it in half with a little 
paring knife I'd bought when Ricky came up behind me and 
grabbed my arm and twisted it so the knife went springing 
across the table, cartwheeled off onto its point. 

I heard myself yell, scream really, and I watched the knife 
as it fell. I watched very closely because the pain in my arm, 
the wrench, electrified me. The wooden boards stood out in 
focus. The texture of the bread. 

"Surprise!" said Ricky, letting go. "I read your mind 
just now." 

I turned, cradling my elbow. 

■'Wha'dya mean?" 

"Whadya mean?" He mimicked a high-pitched whine. I 
had never been struck, hurt, or touched wrong before. I was 
like a baby. I could not connect Ricky with the wrench of pain 
I felt. At the next table over a woman watched us. She looked 
shocked, her mouth open to say something, so I shrugged at 
her and shook my head. 1 was first and foremost terribly em- 
barrassed for Ricky Zachs. But he just bit into his sandwich, 
chewed, and then that big clean football captain smile spread 
across his face, all white keys. I held my arm and looked into 
his eyes, and I don't know. I smiled back at him. I didn't 
know what else to do. 

I kept smiling as we got into the car, as we drove. What hcul I 
been thinking, I wondered. What had he seen? My smile was 
easy to hold now. I felt cheerful. The grin was painted there. 
Then just before Billings, in one of those big gas station stores 
that sell everything, words began to stick to my feelings. I had 
gone into the ladies" room. When I came out of the stall. I 
stood before a padlocked dispenser of condoms. Placed in 
this establishment for your convenience, said the lettering on 
its front. 50 cents. 2 quarters only. 



"Too much," I thought. 

I went out the door and stood beside Ricky. He was putting 
some money in the slot of a plastic b<jx full of small soft ani- 
mals, plush rhinos and pink elephants and candy-striped 
bears. Over them a little tin crane's arm swung loose. Ricky 
worked it from a lever. 

"Which one do you want?" he said. 

"None of them." 

"Tough," said Ricky. 

The tin claw hovered, touching down. He was going for a 
small blue bear with shoe-button eyes. The back of the box 
was mirrored, reflecting the scene somehow from another 
mirror, one of the infinite-dimension tricks from movies. The 
pointed tips of the pincers touched the little animal's fur. 
Ricky had gfxxl small motor co-ordination, that's what he 
said. He always won prizes at the carnival stands pitching 
softballs at wooden milk bottles, shooting lead ducks. Part of 
me admired his delicate touch with the loaded controls, and 
part of me watched this all happen in the mirror. 

1 grabbed his arm, as if in excitement. 

The crane swung and clinked against the side of the box, 
the claw bounced and Ricky went dark with anger. 

"Get in the car," he ordered. 

I walked past him. I was glad. I couldn't stand that fur toy's 
little stitched-on mouth, its shocked black eyes. 

That night, I took a long time getting my hair perfect, setting 
it to ripple down my shoulders in a golden mane. I chose my 
red V-neck chiffon and a piece of jewelry with real drama — a 
large filigreed arrowhead hanging from a wire neckband. I 
stayed in the little tile bathroom, at the vanity sink, surround- 
ed by my beauty equipment. Blow-dryer. Electric rollers. 
Sprays. A pronged curling iron. These things were like defen- 
sive weaponry. They bristled, hot and female. 

Ricky did not come near me. He sat right outside the door, 
on the balcony, in a webbed vinyl chair. He sipped from a 
plastic cup and contemplated what was happening below him 
in the courtyard around the pool. It was after dinner and the 
sun's rays were long and cool. The water spread out like a 
gleaming sheet. People sat around on the deck, in white plas- 
tic chairs, also drinking out of cups. I heard one of them 
shout, "You wanna party?" 

"No thanks, " I heard Ricky answer. I knew that as he 
watched them he worried that later this evening, maybe as 
late as after the show , the party would still be going on un- 
derneath our room. I knew it too. I could hear it — their 
voices rising, their laughter, loud and drunken. He would 
be stuck, listening, and yet he never meant to stay here, that 
was never his intent. This was a stopping place, a way sta- 
tion on the road to somewhere else, a temporary residence 
where he could wait while his luck changed, and the dam- 
age collected behind him. 

Rain fills Ricky's tracks. Luck runs out the holes. He leaves 
his wallet with our money on the bed. and I stuff almost all our 
cash into my bra. And then when 1 do not return from fetching 
ice for his drink, he finds himself stranded at the Billings Best 
Western with ten dollars, a suitcase, and no ice bucket. I can 
see it. He does not believe the truth at first. He continues sit- 
ting in the same spot. 

In the sheet of chlorinated water below, reflecting ^324 



i 




H, 



me work of painter Susan 



has undergone major changes throughout 

"^ her career. Noy^rf^r life is^oing 
li the same, DodieKazanjian discovers 



,*i* n 



i 








292 



'^^ 



^.^ 



\. 



r 




*^ 





"iiUfjkhJ 




•-•^'t' 



A new husband and a new 

locale. Susan Rothenberg 

with Bruce Nauman 

on his New Mexico 

ranch. The artist's 

palette, opposite, in her 

New York studio. 



Photographer: Eric Boman 



<m:- 



new image 

jH ust about everything in Susan Rothenberg's life is 

J changing. After twenty years of living and working 
in a New York City loft, she is moving to New Mexi- 
co with her new husband, artist Bruce Nauman. Her 
seventeen-year-old daughter, Maggie, the person 
she has been closest to since her earlier marriage to 
artist George Trakas broke up a dozen years ago, is 
going away to college. And her work, which has been 
through several metamorphoses over the years, is going 
through another one right now. 

"All I know is the 'U-Tum' body image I've been 
working on for the last year or so is coming to an end, ' ' she 
says. "So I'm doodling and noodling about with new im- 
agery. It's what I always do when I sense that there's just 
not another idea about a particular image. ' ' 

We are in her New York studio, surrounded by some of 
the large unfinished canvases that will be in her next show 
at the Sperone Westwater gallery from April 28 through 
May 26. She is five feet two inches tall, but she doesn't 
have that small-person look, and she seems at least ten 
years younger than her forty-five years. In dark green cot- 
ton pants, a frazzled sweater, and black Chinese slippers 
with red soles, spattered with oil paint, she is spunky, 
friendly, and unpretentious, a woman who makes you feel 
immediately comfortable. Semiabstract paintings with 
blurred images are stapled to the walls. The colors are very 
bright — reds, yellows, and pinks — colors that are a long 
way from the siennas, blacks, and whites she is known for. 
Painting has never been easy for Rothenberg. Her can- 
vases develop very slowly and with many false starts. She 
probably destroys more pictures than she finishes, and she 
has a lot of anxieties about exhibiting new work. "Going 
public with what you've been doing privately for a couple 
of years is a frightening position to be in. Every time, I 
think it's all over. The critics are going to slam me. No- 
body's going to buy the work. The dealer will drop me. 
Complete negativity all around me. Black cloud. ' ' 

Rothenberg made her reputation in 1976 with her first 
show at the Willard Gallery . Her ghostly , painterly images 
of primitive-looking horses established her immediately 
as one of the leading "new image" painters, a group that 
also included Lois Lane, Robert Moskowitz, and Neil Jen- 
ney. When she began painting the horse image, she says, 
"I thought, now you've really put yourself out of the New 
York art world, because nobody's going to take an image 
of a horse. It was too much image for how cool and formal- 
ist those times were." But Hilton Kramer, then the critic 
for The New York Times, wrote about her first show. 
" . . . it is the quality of the painting that is so impressive — 
the authority with which a highly simplified image is 
transformed into a pictorial experience of great sensitivity 
and even grandeur." She soon had a waiting list of eager 
buyers. William Rubin, the director of painting and sculp- 
ture at the Museum of Modem Art, bought two paintings 
out of her studio after the first show. "I don't think I've 
ever had a bigger charge from anything," she says. "He 



A painting in progress, S/ue U-Tum, that Rothenberg 
originally began as a portrait of Nauman. The work will 

be included in her new exhibition, perhaps in a 

somewhat different form, since she continues working 

on her paintings until right before a show opens. 



~^ . 



'^"^ 



uri.? 




295 








came clumping up my splintered stairs, and he waved his 
cane and told me he wanted to see them all around the 
room, instead of one by one." 

the horse image obsessed her for six years, but 
then, as she says, "it left me. It disassembled 
itself and then it abstracted itself out of my life, 
which left the gap that the heads and hands 
filled." The images that took its place were 
semiabstract, isolated human hands and iconic heads in 
fields of acrylic brushstrokes. Her work remained in 
great demand, but Rothenberg herself stayed very much 
in the background. She turned down retrospectives right and 
left, including one at the Whitney. "Those shows were being 
produced one after another, and there was too much hippity- 
hop." she says. Martin Friedman, the director of the Walker 
Art Center in Minneapolis, did persuade her to let him orga- 
nize a retrospective a couple of years ago; it was going to 
come to the Museum of Modem Art after the Walker, but 
Friedman and Bill Rubin couldn't agree on the details and the 
whole show went down the drain. "It was exciting. These 
two bulls of the art world. But I got lost in there somehow." 
She has avoided meeting collectors, given few interviews 
(I waited three years for this one), and refused to think about 
career strategies. Unlike Julian Schnabel. David Salle, and 
other successful artists of her generation. Rothenberg has 
shunned the publicity and hoopla of the art world. She has 
produced relatively little work. After the heads and hands, 
she went on to full-length human figures at rest and then in 
more and more agitated motion. The image of the Buddha ob- 
sessed her briefly. She spent most of 1988 on a corporate 
commission for the Paine Webber building in New York 

296 




Scenes from a painter's life, clockwise from top left; a 

new work in progress; the recently issued marriage 

license; Rothenberg with one of the quarter horses on the 

New Mexico ranch; the living area of the New York loft, 

with a full-size pool table, Rothenberg's Four Color, and a 

horse painted by her daughter, Maggie, when she was five; 

an early painting, Butterfly, 1976, done from memory. 

City. Now she's struggling with the next step. 

Rothenberg works from mental images and memory, not 
from life. In this, she is very similar to Bruce Nauman, whose 
work she has admired since she first saw it in 1969. "I've 
known him — just hi. how are you, nice to see you, liked your 
show — for twenty years, and I've always had a crush on the 
guy. I actually even wrote him a fan letter once, which he 
doesn't remember." In 1969. artist Mary Heilmann took her 
to lunch with Nauman; he doesn't remember that either. "I 
would see Bruce for five minutes every three or four years. I 
would go to an opening just to see him. 

Nauman was aware of Rothenberg's work before he be- 
came aware of her. "I noticed Susan's work about ten years 
ago." he told me. "[The critic] Peter Schjeldahl took me to 



ew image 




Jtta. 



new image 



her show of heads and hands, which was very important 
for me. I liked it a lot and thought about it a lot. I had been 
thinking about a head and about hands. And her work 
helped to clarify my thinking." 

Bruce Nauman is not a painter. One of the quirkiest and 
most respected Conceptual artists around, he has worked 
with objects, with cast body parts, with film and video, 
with verbal structures, and, currently, with cast or uncast 
taxidermy forms of caribou, bobcats, bears, foxes, and 
deer. (He had three shows in New York in March and is 
prominently featured in a minimalist sculpture show at the 
Whitney; the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston is planning a 
major retrospective for 1993.) In the winter of 1968-69, 
Nauman, who grew up in the Midwest and took a master's 
degree in fine arts from the University of California at Da- 
vis, was living in Southampton, Long Island. Leo Castelli 
started to show him at that time, along with Keith Sonnier 
and Richard Serra, and there was suddenly a tremendous 
demand for his work. "I was able to complete every 
thought I ever had and execute it. I felt completely used up 
at the end of six months. It was necessary to put a distance 
between me and New York. I hadn't learned to say no." 
Nauman moved to California ("Even when I lived in Pasa- 
dena, I was living outside L. A. I've always felt more com- 
fortable on the edge"). He lived there for the next ten 
years. Then he moved to New Mexico, where he has spent 
the past decade. 








rothenberg took a trip to New Mexico in 1985, 
and while she was there she learned that Peter 
Schjeldahl (who had written favorably about her 
work) was visiting Nauman at his house in Pecos. 
"So I got myself invited there for one night — to flirt, ' ' she 
says with a giggle. In October 1988, Rothenberg's new 
dealer, Angela Westwater, who represents Nauman joint- 
ly with Castelli, gave a dinner after a Nauman opening. 
She invited Rothenberg and sat her next to Nauman. 
"There were about ten people there," says Rothenberg. 
"I was not in good shape, nor was he, both of us having 
recently broken up with our prior partners . ' ' 

He asked her to lunch in the Village. Afterwards, they 
walked all the way uptown to see a show at Asia House. 
"It was kind of quiet and awkward that day. We didn't 
quite know how to be together. We shared a cab, and I 
dropped him at the Gramercy Park Hotel and went on 
home. I thought, it didn't happen. I've liked him so much 
for so long. This time I wasn't thinking romantically. We 
were shy with each other. So I thought he wouldn't call 
again. But he did. And I said that I was having a dinner 
party on Friday, could he come? He came to dinner and he 
never left." 

Four months later they were married. "One morning he 
said. Do you want to see the Siennese show at the Met or 
do you want to go check that deal out down at City Hall? 
So I said. Are you kidding? I want to go check the deal 
out." They got their marriage license and the next morn- 
ing grabbed a cab, ran to Chinatown to buy the wedding 
rings — "that old yellow gold stuff" — then taxied to the 
Staten Island ferry, she in a black silk Armani suit, he ► 320 

Rothenberg relaxing in her studio with one of the 
unfinished works to be included in her latest exhibition. 

298 



i 



If you believe the hype, weVe all walking around 
with time bombs in our rib cages. But cholesterol 
is not a code word for heart disease. Things 
aren't as bleak as they seem — especially for 
women. Mary Roach examines the evidence 




he waiting room at the local walk-in cholesterol 
screening clinic doesn't have much in the way of 
reading material: U.S. News & World Report, 
Cat Fancy, a selection of American Heart Asso- 
ciation pamphlets. I choose one of the latter — 
"The Truth About Women and Heart Dis- 
ease" — and sit down to wait my turn. 

Should have gone for Cat Fancy. "Heart at- 
tack is the number one killer of American women." "The 
steadily ticking time bomb of heart disease. . . " "Five hun- 
dred thousand women's lives each year. . ." "The higher 
your blood cholesterol, the more likely ..." 

I came here because I was curious. Now I'm just plain ner- 
vous. Three minutes to the moment of reckoning. The ma- 
chine considers my lipids, silently, irrevocably. 

Total cholesterol, flashes the display, 203. Over 200! Bor- 
derline high, according to my pamphlet. How can this be? 
I'm young. I'm skinny. I put oat bran on my Frosted Flakes. 
The technician shrugs. "It's not that bad." She hands me a 
guide to heart-smart eating and sends me on my way. 

Not that bad? From all I've heard, there's a time bomb in 
my rib cage. And if it's not that bad, why do I have to stop 
eating cream cheese? 

This is typical of the sort of "advice" we've been getting 
about cholesterol and heart disease. We're up to our aortas in 
books and articles and nutritional labeling, but we can't get a 
straight answer about whether we should really worry about 
cholesterol. The National Cholesterol Education Program 
(NCEP) and the American Heart Association advise women 
to start checking their blood cholesterol levels at age twenty 
and to follow a low-fat diet, regardless of their health. (At the 
end of February that advice was extended to children and the 



elderly as well.) Books like Thomas J. Moore's Heart Fail- 
ure are saying all this is just hype — scare tactics designed to 
get healthy, low-risk individuals to spend their money on lab 
fees and "heart healthy" packaged foods. We're stuck in the 
middle- — concerned, confused, thoroughly fed up. 

As well we should be. The fact is, very little research has 
been done on cholesterol and heart disease in low-risk 
groups . Studies of women are under way , but in the meantime 
the American Heart Association and the NCEP are giving us 
the same advice they're giving middle-aged men. Cautious, 
yes. Rational? Not really. 

' 'Forty-five-year-old men are getting heart disease like no- 
body's business," says Peter W. F. Wilson, director of lab- 
oratories at the Framingham study of the National Heart, 
Lung, and Blood Institute, the one major cholesterol and 
heart disease study to date that includes women. "Is that di- 
rectly translatable to women? No. Almost regardless of their 
risk factors and their cholesterol, women don't get heart dis- 
ease till after menopause. While I agree with the sentiment of 
these programs, we're one of the few studies that can say, 
Look, it's not as simple as that." 

The Female Advantage 

Ask any scientist about women and cholesterol, and the 
discussion soon comes around to the topic of "female protec- 
tion." Women have built-in defenses against the buildup of 
fatty deposits in their arteries. Compared with men, they tend 
to have higher levels of "good" cholesterol — the kind that's 
carried around inside tiny spheres of high-density lipoprotein 
(HDL). Unlike their low-density kin, LDL, which tend to 
park cholesterol on your artery walls, these benevolent HDL 
blobs transport it safely back to the liver. (Whether cholester- 



omen are given the same advice about cholesterol 



ol is good or bad may simply dep)end on where it's headed. 
It's like chewing gum: most gets thrown out in the trash; it's 
the stuff that sticks to the edge of the bus seat that you've got 
to watch out for.) 

Unfortunately, female protection doesn't prevent heart 
disease — it simply delays it. "Women are about ten years be- 
hind men," says Wilson. "Men don't have much heart dis- 
ease until around age forty; with women it's fifty." After 
menopause, good cholesterol seems to dry up, and the bad 
stuff accumulates rapidly on artery walls. By age sixty, rates 
of heart disease among men and women are about equal. 

Why women get this reprieve isn't fully understood. For 
years, physiologists have assumed that the female hormone 
estrogen somehow makes arteries more resistant to deposits 
of cholesterol. (During menopause, of course, estrogen lev- 
els fall off.) Estrogen may also be responsible for women's 
higher levels of HDL. But recent findings indicate that body 
fat distribution may play a role, too. That is, when it comes to 
having plenty of protective HDL cholesterol, being shaped 
like a woman may be more important than actually being a 
woman. Pear-shaped (gynecoid) women and men, who carry 
their weight on their hips and behinds, have higher levels of 
good cholesterol than the more slim-hipped, paunch-prone 
(android) types. 

Where Tests Break Down 

All this talk of good and bad cholesterol should clue you in 
to an important point: for women especially, a test that lumps 
HDL and LDL cholesterol into one big number can be mis- 
leading. A high total may simply be due to a surplus of 
HDL — which is good, not bad — as was the case with me, I 
learned. Based on my total score, the American Heart Associ- 
ation would put me in the borderline-high-risk category. But 
a more accurate gauge of risk is the ratio of total cholesterol to 
HDL, and by that measure, I'm low-risk. A ratio of around 
four to one is normal; seven to one would be high-risk; three 
to one, low-risk. 

Walk-in tabletop screening tests don't give you that ratio. 
Nor do they measure other blood fats, such as triglycerides. 
Triglyceride levels are proving to be of particular relevance to 
women. The Framingham study found that among women, 
but not men, higher triglyceride levels were related to a high- 
er risk of heart attack. Why? No one knows for sure, but it 
appears to be related to HDL. When triglyceride levels rise, 
HDL tends to go down. 

To get the best cholesterol test, have your doctor send your 
blood sample to a hospital lab equipped to measure HDL, 
LDL, and other blood lipids. The analysis will not only be 
more complete than a tabletop reading, it will also be more 
accurate. A vtctni Journal of the American Medical Associa- 
tion survey found 5 to 27 percent variation in portable screen- 
ing machines. The people who ran them often compounded 
the problem; of four testing sites, investigators found just one 
that issued reliable results. Even if you do luck into an accu- 
rate test, most screening staff know next to nothing about 
heart disease. They can tell you your score, but it's up to a 
doctor to follow through with advice. 



Calculating the Real Risks 

Once you know your cholesterol levels, what do you do? It 
depends. "You can't look at cholesterol in isolation," says 
Robert E. Olson, professor of medicine at the State Universi- 
ty of New York, Stony Brook, and author of Balanced Nutri- 
tion: Beyond the Cholesterol Scare. "Let's take a woman in 
the borderline cholesterol category — say 230. Say she's got 
no family history of heart disease, she's physically fit, has 
normal HDL, normal blood pressure, normal weight, doesn't 
smoke. I would say to that lady, 'Forget it. Don't worry about 
it.' Cholesterol has become a code word for heart disease. 
People are looking at their cholesterol numbers as the all-de- 
termining variable. And that's just not true." 

Indeed. Here are some other important variables to consid- 
er in determining your risk of heart disease. 

Smoking. Smoking is the most significant heart attack risk 
factor for women — much more significant than cholesterol 
levels. Women who smoke are two to six times more likely 
than nonsmoking women to have heart attacks. Smoking not 
only raises your blood pressure — which puts a strain on your 
heart and arteries — it also contributes to atherosclerosis, 
thickening of the artery walls. "Instead of having lots of oxy- 
gen in your blood," explains Peter W. F. Wilson of the Fra- 
mingham study, "you have carbon monoxide. When the 
cells that line the artery walls become starved for oxygen, 
they're more likely to build up deposits. ' ' 

Smoking is particularly dangerous for women who use 
birth control pills. Women who smoke and take oral contra- 
ceptives face a forty-fold increase in their risk of heart attack. 
(There is conflicting evidence as to whether the pill increases 
heart attack risk among nonsmoking women.) No one knows 
exactly why this is. Oral contraceptives may contribute to the 
formation of blood clots, and smoking constricts the arteries. 
It's a deadly combination: when a clot gets caught in a nar- 
rowed artery, it cuts off the blood supply to the surrounding 
area. If that area is in the heart, that's a heart attack. (If it's in 
the brain, that's a stroke.) 

High blood pressure. High blood pressure (above 140/90) 
puts a strain on the heart and arteries, making their owner 
more susceptible to heart attack. More than half of all women 
over fifty-five have high blood pressure. 

Obesity. Excess weight also puts a strain on the heart: peo- 
ple who are obese (more than 30 percent over their ideal 
weight) face a greater risk of heart disease and stroke. So do 
people who carry more fat around their waist than their hips. 
In fact, new studies of both women and men indicate that hip- 
to- waist ratio may be a more significant risk factor than over- 
all weight. 

Diabetes. Diabetes is a metabolism disorder — an inability 
to break down sugar properly. Women with diabetes tend to 
have both high blood cholesterol levels and high blood pres- 
sure, making their risk of heart attack more than double that 
of nondiabetic women. For unknown reasons, diabetic wom- 
en (but not men) are also twice as likely as people without dia- 
betes to suffer a second heart attack. 

Family history. Heart disease runs in families. If your par- 
ents, grandparents, uncles, or aunts have had heart dis- ► 323 



im 



ddle-aged men. Cautious? Yes. Rational? Not really. 




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Anoraks and shorts began as gritty ail- 



American gear European designers raised them to 



couture status. Never easily outdone, Americans ' 
strike back- with chic interpretations in navy and 
^■^ white at a considerably redefined price 



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The Eisenhower jacket in lightweight rayon, a more polished fabric, to wear for day or evening. Paulina "in disguise"— in a 

Louise Brooks-style wig. Battle jacket, about $65, by OBR at The Limited. The natural makeup that's both sporty and 

sophisticated: Perfect Pearl Perfect Lipstick by Estee Lauder Signature. Details, stores, last pages. 

Fashion Editor: Polly Mellen Photographer: Arthur Elgort 




^ 



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dres^ for les 



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The duafjjfature of 

sportswear- inspired pieces: 

an anorak that becomes a 

blazer, leggings stolen from 

exercise gear;to replace a 

city skirt, opposite page: 

Donna Karan's'urban anorak, 

about $280; From DKNY. 

Bergdorf Gjoodman; I. 

Magnin. Dre^ by Michael 

Leva, about |f220. Bergdorf 

Goodman. T^^ page. Giving 



the "Cha 
younger, ligl 
leSKings, 

Crew. J. Cr 

Hill MA 

Cardigan ja 




jacket a 

learted edge — 

$38, by J. 

NYC, Chestnut 
Francisco. 
.It, about $162, 
by J. H. /follectibles. 
Bloomingt^e's. Details, 
more sto»es, last pages. 






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What takes a pair of shorts 

or a polo shirt into evening: 

an unconventionally luxurious 

fabric, opposite page: Lace 

shorts and a cotton twill 

riding jacket. Shorts, about 

$140, by Thea Anema. Henri 

Bendel. Randolph Duke 
riding jacket, alMMit $298. 

Henri Bendel; Neiman 

Marcus, in the background: a 

taffeta peasant top. about 

$220. byTarlazzi II. 

Silhouette. Washington DC; 

Anastasia. Beverly Hills, this 

PAGE: A cashmere polo shirt 

paired with a Lycra skirt. Top, 

alMut $170, by Marc 

Jacobs for Perry Ellis. 

Bergdorf Goodman; I. 

Magnin. Skirt, about $65, by 

isaia NYC. Fertility. NYC; 

Tootsies, Houston. Details, 

more stores, last pages. 







aress ror less 





I 



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m 



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dress for less 



"What could be easier than a 
T-shirt and a pair of jeans?" 

asks Michael McCollom, 

designer for Isaia. Here, he 

sinnply eliminates the jeans — 

and attaches biker-style 

shorts, OPPOSITE PAGE. 

Romper, about $150, by 

Isaia NYC. Fertility, NYC; 

Clare Feldman's Allure, Coral 

Gables FL; Gallay, West 

Hollywood CA. this PACL: 

Making a jean jacket softer 
and more comfortable terry 

cloth. ByTarlazzi II, about 

$355. Carol Rollo/Riding 
High, NYC; Silhouette, Chevy 

Chase MD; Anastasia, 
Beverly Hills. Sw/imsuit, about 

$135, by Dianne Beaudry. 

Henri Bendel; Serge Paris, 

Chicago; La Befana, San 
Marino CA. In this story: hair, 
Michael Tammaro for Bumble 

+ Bumble; makeup, Sonia 
Kashuk. Wigs from Theresa's 

Wigs, NYC. Details, more 
stores, last pages. 



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Remember, yojn^ap what you sow. 



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Diamonds. They kind of grow on you. Trt^ Diamonds of Distinction Award honors the best in American Design.| 

(^heck this^page each month for the hew v^inners. Or cheat and send for a free booklet showing the entire year's' 

%^' winning pieces, priced from $2,200-$f500. In the US and Canada, call 800 926-2700. A diamond is forever. . 

May Winners • Diamonds of Distinction \ 




el pack rat 
» Shields gets 
mingdale's 
pop-up book. 




fashi 



Editor: Giselle Benatar 



At fashionable events, 
designer loot bags are 

the gift of chic. Here 

revealed, the smart 

set's nightly take 



lette Mosbacher 
Paloma Picasso 
)tion to her 
netics empire. 





Ready, set, take: the very popular 
popcorn bags from Mortimer's 

WHEN IT COMES TO DESIGNER PARTY 
booty, loot hounds believe in the re- 
distribution of wealth. Georgette 
Mosbacher and Kenneth Jay Lane 
routinely slip fragrant favors to their 
office staff, while Jerome Zipkin, 
adds Lane, "recycles his and gives 
them as Christmas presents . ' ' 

TALKING... ► 314 

^^ Table raider Susan 
Gutfreund gets a scarf from 
Oscar de la Renta. 





0<4. 



Mary and Laurance 
Rockefeller receive a tL^ 
fragrant donation from 
Carolina Herrera. 



k Calvin and Kelly Klein 
' get designer doggie 
bags from Ralph Lauren. 



Art patrons 

Nan Kempner • 

and Chessy ^[^ 

Rayner add a 

Canaletto to 

their collections. 



311 




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SAMSARA 

GUERL\JN 



SENSE 

OF 

SERENITY 



PARFUM 



PARIS 



Guerldin Boutique-By-M.iil 1-800-882-8820 

Saks Fifth Avenue, Marshall Field's 



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Michael Kors 



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When fashion design 
Michael Kors Takes 
his show on the road^ 
Rachel Urquhart find^^ 
the star remains in 
the dressing room 
and the audience 
emerges in sequins 




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314 



s Sulphur 




IT IS A WEEKDAY MORNING, AND THE DRESSING ROOMS 
at the Gazebo, an exclusive Dallas retailer, swarm with 
well-groomed, rich Texas women in various states of 
undress. Saleswomen bustle back and forth, their arms 
full of clothes and fluttering order forms. Waiters in 
white jackets pass out pastries and step gingerly over 
discarded dresses. A show model changes outfits every 
thirty minutes. The women, many of whom will spend 
between $7,000 and $25,000 before the day is done, 
keep right on shopping. 

' ' I can see that she ' s buxom , but does she 
have rolls?" 

"There is no way that I'm anything over a 
size six!" 

"Oh. I shouldn't buy it a//. . .lam build- 
ing a house this year!" 

Michael Kors, whose Dallas trunk show 
is the reason for all this fuss, is on bended 
knee in the middle of the changing area. He 
discreetly takes one customer's measure- 
ments, while advising another on what shoes 
to wear. In the moments that follow, he tells 
a young woman — quite convincingly — 
"You look better than Cindy Crawford in 
that dress," assures someone else that she 
can wear a bra under his tight, off-the-shoul- 
der knit top, and, with a mischievous glance 
at the woman he is fitting, tucks a sequined 
hem high up her well-aerobicized thigh. 

He has obviously been through this before. 

Like many designers, Michael Kors has logged his 
share of miles on the trunk-show circuit, taking sam- 
ples from his New York fashion shows on the road in 
order to give clients in other cities a preview of the 
upcoming season. It can be exhausting, but he 
would be the first to agree that for everyone con- 
cerned, a trunk show is a no-lose situation. The 
clients get to consult designers personally and 
order the items they want without having to wait for the 
collection to hit the stores; the retailers get both the 
prestige of having a well-known designer on the pre- 
mises for a day and the chance to make big sales (some- 
times as much as $450,000 in one day for a particular 
designer); and the designers get to publicize themselves 
and sell lots and lots of clothes. 

Like any traveling circus, a trunk show's success de- 
pends largely on the performance of its star. A designer 
with a gregarious dressing-room manner — such as 
Kors or Bill Blass or Donna Karan, to name three of the 
trunk-show circuit's most popular performers — can 
rack up hundreds of thousands of dollars in sales in one 
appearance. In the last year there were over seventy 
Michael Kors trunk shows at venues ranging from spe- 
cialty stores like the Gazebo and the Front Room in 
New Orleans to retailers like Bergdorf Goodman 
and Neiman Marcus. And even though Kors him- 
self was not at every show, 1 5 percent of his ► 316 





fashion 



Kors's spring sequin ensemble dazzles Dallas. 

total sales were made on the road. 

And trunk shows are not only instructive for the cus- 
tomer. "You'd be amazed at the difference between 
what you think people are going to want and what they 
actually end up buying," says Kors. "It can be a little 
scary if you ' ve really guessed wrong . ' ' 

A trunk-show day starts fast and early. In Dallas, be- 
fore it's even nine o'clock, Kors is in high gear, drink- 
ing Dr. Pepper, smoking cigarettes, and tossing pieces 
from his spring collection onto the floor. Surrounded 
by saleswomen, he is leading the designer equivalent of 
apregame pep rally. Most of his audience is strategical- 
ly uniformed in his designs; most are already on their 
second Cokes of the morning. (In Dallas, if you haven't 
drunk at least a half dozen Cokes by midday, you're 
just not normal.) The women oooh and ahhh apprecia- 
tively as Kors waves each new design in the air, ex- 
plains how and with what other pieces it should be 
worn, and then drops it haphazardly at his feet into a 
growing pile of stripes, solids, sequins, and taffeta. 

"Now, ladies," he says, "I won't kill any of you if this 
happens, but we should try not to sell head-to-toe sequins. 
It happens, I know — this is Dallas, after all. And let's not 
even talk about that customer last year. With the gold 
lame pants, top, and jacket with heels to match!'' 

At this remembrance of trunk shows past, there is a 
moment of collective eye rolling. After six years, there 
is an obvious history to Kors's shows at the Gazebo. 

"Michael is one of the best," says Shelle Bagot, 
owner of the Gazebo. "He really seems to care about 
the ladies. His customers herejust love him." 

But even with a loyal base of fans in Dallas, Kors had 
worried that the drizzly gray weather might deter his 
women. "You know," he'd confided that morning, 
"it's the Big Hair Problem." 

As it turns out, he needn't have been concerned. At a 
few minutes after ten, his first customers arrive. With 
their letter-opener heels clicking efficiently on the mar- 
ble floor of the entrance way, they make a beeline ^'or 

316 



the soda fountain nestled between racks of 
Byblos in the designer section where Kors's 
clothes are being displayed. Then they set 
their jaws for some serious shopping. 

The cast of characters in Dallas is, to say the 
least, colorful. There is the woman who mar- 
ried her gardener, and brings him (dressed in a 
white fur coat, no less) everywhere she goes; 
the woman who calls from a tiny Texas cow 
town in search of personal guidance from Mi- 
chael about which of his clothes she should 
buy for her "social dancin' classes"; the 
woman who sends her favorite salesclerk to 
find out exactly who's ordered a particular 
item, so that she doesn't buy anything anyone 
else has. Somehow — perhaps through having 
learned that it is the different personalities of a 
city's die-hard shoppers that make trunk 
shows so interesting — Kors manages to take 
care of them all. 
The current focus of Kors's attention is slightly 
concerned about skirt length , or rather the lack there- 
of. Kors is ready with assurance. * 'The length on this 
stuff is more generous than it seems on these pieces — 
you know, it's all got to be crotch-high for the show. 
The slit won't be quite as dizzying as it looks here." 
Kors's manner is easy and unthreatening. He gossips 
about who's got fake breasts {''Real ones? In Dallas? 
There's no such thing!"). He races back and forth, fer- 
rying as many outfits as any of the saleswomen do. And 
he knows his regulars: who's had babies, what the rela- 
tively rare Dallas career woman will want from him, 
what the young oil magnate's wife will die for, what 
charity balls certain customers need dresses for. 

"Michael really has to be everything," says his se- 
nior design assistant, Anna de Luca. "A designer, an 
entertainer, a hand-holder, a salesman, an adviser. And 
the best thing is , he " s good at them all . " 

Over a quick lunch of Dallas-style barbecue (ordered 
from a take-out stand down the street, just the way Kors 
likes it — shavings of stringy meat on high, humid white 
rolls with plenty of spicy sauce to glop on top), his ex- 
pertise is apparent. He can sum up the character of en- 
tire cities by describing which of his 
clothes the women buy: colorful^ 
fringe dresses in Miami, starkly el- 
egant work clothes in New York, 
down-to-earth cottons in Chicago. 
The big sellers in Dallas this time 
are his sequined miniskirts and 
strapless dresses; the tight off-the- 
shoulder knit tops; and the taffeta pull- 
on shells. 

"You really get to see what's out 
there," he says. Before he can contin- 
ue, a voice over the intercom an- 
nounces that his flight to New Orleans, 
the site of his next trunk show, has just 
been confirmed.* talking. . . ► 318 





Donna Karan's latest collection of socks, tights, and sheers 



^ll 




•b<3 



The one dress Betsey and Lulu Johnson can agree upon 




Designing Mothers When 
it comes to designers and 
their offspring, it's unclear 
who influences whom. Bet- 
sey Johnson finds Lulu a 
mitigating force: "She re- 
fuses to walk with me when 
I look funny." But Patricia 
Clyne finds Emily an inspi- 
ration: one of Emily's 
jackets was such a hit that 
Patricia added larger ver- 
sions to her collection. 



318 



Like mother hke daughter: 
Tatiana and Diane Von Furstenberg 



fashi 



ion 




GIORGIO ARMAM 



OG I' E MAY 1990 



OCCHIALI 



NEW IMAGE 

(Continued from page 298) 

in jeans and cowboy hat and boots. They were married in Staten 
Island City Hall. Their honeymoon was one night at the Carlyle 
Hotel. "Angela got us a room and we had Chateaubriand while 
we watched Rocky on TV. Peter Schjeldahl and his wife and a 
friend of mine came up for breakfast, and then we finally went to 
the Siennese show. When I introduced Bruce to my mother, I was 
wearing short pants, and she said, 'Do you know that Suzy has 
very good legs?" He said, 'Yes, Mrs. Rothenberg." " 

The living side of her downtown loft has two big horse paint- 
ings — one by her ("its the only painting of mine I've ever lived 
with"), the other by her daughter, Maggie, who was five when 
she painted it. The living room is dominated by a full-size pool 
table, for which Maggie is also responsible — the result of a bribe 
whose origins Susan can no longer remember. One wall is cov- 
ered with graffiti applied by Maggie's thirteenth birthday party 
guests, who were astonished and delighted when Maggie's moth- 
er gave them the go-ahead. There are also an Elizabeth Murray 
drawing, an early Bruce Nauman drawing called Arm Pit, and 
four small oil paintings by Susan's mother. Each wall in her bed- 
room is painted a different color: yellow, green, red, and white. 
Her whole living and dining area will become Nauman's New 
York studio after the move to New Mexico. They will come back 
to New York whenever they feel like it, but their real home is go- 
ing to be out there. Since their marriage, Bruce has continued to 
live in New Mexico, and Susan has stayed at herTribeca loft be- 
cause "I want to see this kid of mine through her senior year of 
high school. We're always traveling to see one another. The time 
that we do spend together is more precious, and work takes a side 
position. We've never spent more than ten days together. We're 
longing for the everyday pattern now." Susan and Bruce have 
bought six hundred acres in New Mexico, about twenty minutes 
from Santa Fe. They're building two studios and a one-story ado- 
be ranch house with lots of porches. She's going to paint her stu- 
dio "hot yellow ," his red, and the house brown. 

Although in the past Rothenberg 's images have come out of 
her head, it now seems possible to her that they will come from 
her surroundings. She and Bruce have started collecting Navaho 
rugs. "The imageless rugs are like abstract paintings. I think all 
these color bands in my paintings are coming from Navaho rugs. 
And God knows what's going to happen from the red earth and 
the sky. I have an idea of turning this red desert in New Mexico 
into green." Rothenberg never cleans her brushes, just jams 
them in a can of turpentine along with lots of other brushes that 
haven't been cleaned for years. "That means that every color 
gets into every painting. I'm a dirty-brush painter." 

Nauman's quarter horses run free on the land, and Susan has 
started to ride again, something she hasn't done since she was a 
child in Buffalo. And for the first time since 1980, a horse's head 
has appeared in one of her paintings. "It's pretty abstract. Now 
that I'm around real horses in New Mexico, I'm pretty sure that I 
will paint horses, but quite differently. I'm not interested in 
painting from life. I'll go out and look at a horse. Then I'll turn 
my back on it and go into my studio and reinvent it for myself. ' ' 

She flops down on the beat-up sofa in her studio, lights a ciga- 
rette, and fondles Al. her slightly beat-up, tan-colored semi-husky. 
"In the early horse paintings, the horse was like a Johns target or a 
Warhol soup can. It was a thing I related to. Now it has to do with 
the life of the horse as I'm beginning to observe it in New Mexico. 
The actual size, weight, and physicalness of the animal, which I 
didn't consider at all before. I'm coming to it in a very weird way, 
like they're going to be my pets, out my bedroom window . So I feel 
if I paint horses again, it's going to be because they're suddenly 
there, and they're physically quite amazing." 

Rothenberg spent the first half of last year trying to do por- 
traits. She tried one of Maggie and one of Bruce, but "it was an 
abysmal failure," she says, lighting up anothercigarette. "Itried 
to be too literal and have the person around, and find out where 



the hand was and what color the shadows were. I hated it. " A few 
years before, she did a portrait of her friend Elizabeth Murray that 
was shown at the Willard Gallery . "I just had her over here once 
or twice for a few minutes and did a drawing. But the painting 
was made from memory. It became a memory picture. " 

Rothenberg is still interested in doing portraits. "I like beauti- 
ful portraitS\ I like Velasquez. And Goya, and Giacometti. A lot 
of what I've been doing in the last few years is just trying to work 
with the human figure — body, head, arm, leg. whatever it is. 
Pieces of it. To explore emotional kinds of states. Then that di- 
gressed into motion for a while. It was emotion, then it became 
motion, and now it's so strange that I don't know what to say the 
work is. I think that in portraits, there's another way of continu- 
ing the same exploration of emotional truths. Seeing if I could 
push paint around in a manner that would make their presences 
and some of their inside stuff felt — at least you could infer things 
about them from the way I would choose to paint them." 

She would love to try a portrait of Bruce again. "In fact, that 
portrait of Bruce is what turned into Blue U-Turn. It just kept 
changing until it was all gone." Blue U-Turn, one of the paint- 
ings in her show , looks something like a human figure in the form 
of a U. In her last show, three years ago, the images seemed to be 
in violent motion, spinning and twisting across the canvas. (An- 
gela Westwater thinks this had to do with the upheavals in her life 
at the time.) In Blue U-Turn and her other current paintings the 
motion is slowed way down. "I wanted to do something with the 
body in a much slower way, twist it or fold it or do something 
with it. I don't have the words for it. Not for myself or for you. " 

Rothenberg is strikingly candid when talking about herself. 
She seems to hold nothing back. She has admitted to having prob- 
lems with alcohol in the past, and she still chain-smokes, but her 
manner is open and oddly fearless. I ask her about the eight-by- 
ten-foot painting she was working on when we talked a week 
ago — it has disappeared. "I lost it. I kept trying to turn the paint- 
ing into other things. When that happens, unless you're very for- 
tunate and stumble into a new image, you can drive yourself nuts 
because the painting doesn't have anything pushing it along. It 
becomes a very large mistake. So I tore it off the wall, cut it in 
half, folded each half , stomped on it, and put it in this bag." She 
laughs. "And I thought. Oh, there goes my show. Then I felt a 
huge relief just to have a white wall again. I'll finish these two up 
and draw for a few days, hoping that something occurs to me to 
cut a new piece of canvas for. 

She canceled her show scheduled for last October. "My work 
hasn't been going that fast." she says. "Especially in the last two 
years. I was tearing paintings up faster than I could make them. 
Commuting is making it harder than it's ever been for me to work. I 
didn't want to work hard. I wanted to enjoy it. Then when I wanted 
to work hard, I kept getting stuck. There was some comparison of 
my work and Bruce's going on that I always made detrimental to 
myself, honoring his above mine. But this is ending." 

She talks about her work and her ideas with Bruce, "much 
more than I ever have with anybody," she says. "It's clear that 
most of each other's ideas are not acceptable to the other, but we 
can say whatever we want. That gives great freedom of com- 
ment, knowing that you haven't any real power to affect the other 
person. And some stuff sticks. Bruce is a man of few words, but 
when he walks in the studio and says, 'Boy, are you weird, ' then I 
know something's happening. He sits in my studio for half an 
hour or so. He wants to stay pretty out of it, but he's very curious 
how I paint. He's interested in the whole procedure, and also get- 
ting to know me better through seeing how I work. I feel the 
same. We work very differently. I think we're both very curious 
about each other. This is only the second year of us . 

"Our lives are engaging so intensely and so quickly — some- 
times I get scared that I'll lose my identity. That parts of him are 
seeping into me. That the strangeness of his thinking is affecting 
my thinking. I got scared when I started seeing some crossover in 
imagery, both of me to him and him to me. Sometimes I even 
think the work is close. We're both working with heads ► 323 



320 



V O G I E \\.K\ 19 9 





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The histon of the chiUzed \^orld. 
One month at a tune. 




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NEW IMAGE 

(Continuedfrom page 320) 

now . But I have to remind myself of what my history was and how I 
got there. There are similarities historically in our work. He's 
worked with these cut-up animals for a couple of years, and I have 
done animal forms. Sometimes I think about disengaging from an 
image that he might be working with. But then I don't. I refuse to 
interrupt my train of thought in fear that it's too close to his. He 
doesn't have the same problem with that. He lets nothing in. " 

As Nauman sees it, "We've both been using that same hand- 
and-head image, but it comes out of a different necessity. They 
appear to coincide, but then they don't. " 

The two windows in Rothenberg's New York studio have nev- 
er been washed and don't allow much light to enter, but she likes 
it that way. "I like the grayer light. I like rain and gray ness. I feel 
more comfortable in it." She has another studio in Sag Harbor, 
Long Island, with no windows at all. "It's all electric light," she 
says. "I wanted the wails, you see. I had to choose between win- 
dows and walls. ' ' She made the same decision for her New Mexi- 
co studio. "It's very rare that you see paintings in real light." 

Three pictures are taped to the wall over the sink in her studio: 
a drawing by Bruce caWcd Left Hand with All Thumbs , a sketch of 
hers, and a photograph of Stevie Wonder. "That photo makes me 
very happy," she says. "Stevie Wonder, all alone in his studio. 
Like I'm always all alone in here. There he is with all his ma- 
chines and headphones. It reminds me that it's okay to be alone in 
the studio. You know, sometimes it feels very isolated and drea- 
ry, and why did I choose this life? Let me go out and get a job and 
work with people. But when I remember to look at that picture, I 
just think, there's this whole room you get to create in — all alone 
in your room." 

Sometime this summer, ' 'depending on what my kid is up to, " 
Susan Rothenberg will be moving out west. "It's very strange to 
get a new life at the same time as your daughter gets one. I didn't 
expect that. I expected the regularbeing-left-behind feeling. You 
know, flew the coop, nest empty, and all that stuff. But it's not 
working out that way. I'm going to begin a new life also." • 



CHOLESTEROL 

(Continuedfrom page 301) 

ease, you're more likely to as well. Sometimes it's a specific con- 
dition that's inherited. For example, 5 percent of the population 
inherits a genetic tendency for extremely high levels of cholester- 
ol and/or other blood fats. The condition strikes men and women 
equally. "With a genetic lipid disorder, your female protection is 
diminished," says Mary J. Malloy.codirector of the Lipid Clinic 
at the University of California, San Francisco. 

But in general , when the experts talk about genetics they're not 
talking about a single gene that controls your risk of heart dis- 
ease. It's a combination of inherited traits. To begin with, your 
genes help determine the amount of cholesterol your body pro- 
duces from the fatty foods you eat. (Only a fraction of the choles- 
terol in our blood comes directly from foods high in the stuff, like 
eggs; the rest is manufactured by the liver, which is stimulated to 
produce cholesterol by saturated fat.) Genetics also determines 
how "diet-sensitive" you are — that is, the extent to which your 
cholesterol level will respond when you cut back on foods that are 
high in fat. Your arteries' resistance to cholesterol deposits is 
also partly inherited. It's possible to live to ninety-five with a 
cholesterol level of 450; it's also possible to have normal choles- 
terol and die of a heart attack at age twenty-five. 

All told, genetic factors account for an estimated 35 percent of 
a person's overall risk of heart disease. 

Lowering Your Risk 

Some heart disease risk factors can be controlled; others can't. 
You can't choose your parents, for example, but you can quit 
smoking. And you can lower your cholesterol level. 



Diet, not drugs, is the best way to do it. The experts are wary of 
using cholesterol-lowering drugs for women since there are no 
studies that document the benefits or the side effects among low- 
er-risk groups. "Women and the elderly ought to be managed 
mostly by nutrition," says DeWitt Goodman, former chairman 
of the National Cholesterol Education Program's panel on treat- 
ing high cholesterol. "Doctors rush too easily into using drugs. 
We really want them to be cautious. ' ' 

Dieting may not be as easy as taking a pill, but it can be effec- 
tive. "Ifyou really go on an aggressive low-fat diet," says Peter 
Wilson, "your cholesterol will drop 5 to 10 percent, regardless 
of whether you're diet-sensitive. And that's a conservative esti- 
mate. If you gave it two months and it didn't drop at all, I'd bet 
you weren't following the diet." 

Such a diet should include no more than 30 percent of its calo- 
ries from fat. Watching your fat intake is much more important 
than buying every food labeled "no cholesterol." Ifyou look at 
the nutritional lists, you'll see why: saturated fat is measured in 
grams, but cholesterol is measured in milligrams. 

What types of foods contain saturated fat? Meats and dairy prod- 
ucts are the main offenders: all animal fats are saturated. Store- 
bought cookies and crackers often contain saturated vegetable oils. 
They're the ones you can't pour: coconut oil, palm oil, and any oil 
that's been partially hydrogenated. (It'll say so in the ingredients 
list.) 

So let's say you watch your diet and you do manage to lower 
your cholesterol level. Will this actually decrease your risk of 
having a heart attack? If you're a middle-aged man, yes. If you're 
a woman, nobody knows. "Most of the studies have been done 
on high-risk men," says David Leaf, assistant professor of clini- 
cal nutrition at the University of California, Los Angeles, School 
of Medicine and author of the forthcoming book The Feminine 
Heart. "We have data to show that if a woman alters her diet, her 
cholesterol levels will change, but we don't yet have the data to 
prove that this will change her heart disease risk." 

The one study to date that's looked at heart disease and diet 
in a large population of women is the Nurses' Health Study, 
being carried out at Harvard Medical School. Though the re- 
searchers are just starting to analyze the data, it looks as 
though diet may be relatively insignificant in terms of a wom- 
an's overall risk. "If there is a diet effect, it's almost sure to be 
modest compared with smoking, high blood pressure, and dia- 
betes," says Walter Willett, a professor of epidemiology and 
nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health and a principal 
investigator on the study. "These things already explain a 
huge part of the risk . " 

Still, Willett doesn't advocate a return to bacon and eggs and 
ice cream sundaes. Like most experts on the topic of diet and 
heart disease, he speaks of prudence and moderation. Heart dis- 
ease isn't the only reason to avoid saturated fat. For one thing, 
fatty foods are fattening. Ounce for ounce, fats of all kinds are 
twice as calorie-dense as carbohydrates. And obesity is one of the 
risk factors for heart disease. 

Eating a lot of saturated fat also raises your risk of colon can- 
cer. Among the 89,538 women of the Nurses' Health Study, 
those who ate the most saturated fat were most likely to develop 
colon cancer. Similar evidence comes from a study of 35, (XX) 
men and women who are Seventh Day Adventists (vegetarians 
by faith), whose rate of colon cancer turned out to be 40 percent 
lower than that of the general population. (Interestingly, neither 
study found an association between dietary fat and breast can- 
cer—a finding that comes as a surprise, given the number of 
cross-cultural and laboratory-animal studies in the last decade 
that have found an association.) 

Moderation, not martyrdom — that's the ticket. The sensible 
course lies somewhere between the Pritikin counter and the ge- 
lato parlor. There's more to heart smarts than margarine and oat 
bran. Ifyou don't have many risk factors, there's no reason to get 
all keyed up over cholesterol . As an old roommate of mine used 
to say, "Hey, don't have a heart attack." • 



VOC. I' F. MAY 1990 



323 



ALL ABOUT ESTEE 

(Continued from page 2 70) 

"When you say goodbye to the man in your life, you must smell 
divine. He'll remember your scent all day and not his secretary's." 

Lauder is certainly a living monument to her own set of rules. 
She knows well the importance of packaging — she once put a 
perfume in copies of Faberge eggs, and the Duchess put several 
on a side table. Most important, she knows how to package her- 
self. In addition to her ready-to-go outfits, she has a phenomenal 
collection of hats and veils, pins and turbans, evening bags and 
gloves. She bought all her gloves at Hermes and a little shop the 
Duchess led her to in Paris. She's disappointed that in Palm 
Beach she has only her white gloves to show us. She grabs my 
hand and holds it at her elbow. "In New York I have gloves that 
are suede and come up to here with jeweled black ruffles." Her 
eyes shine at the thought of them. Her jewelry is almost exclu- 
sively Van Cleef and early Bulgari and David Webb, her shoes 
always Helene Arpels, her clothes primarily Saint Laurent, Gi- 
venchy , and Pierre Cardin. She rarely goes to the collections any- 
more, preferring to order by phone. They all have her form, and 
after this year's spring show Givenchy made her an evening 
gown in five days, Andre Oliver at Cardin ran one up in two. She 
says Givenchy used to call her and say, "Estee, I just made this 
dress for Madame Pompidou, and I know it'll look pretty on 
you." In the early days, she preferred the slink of Count Sami 
and dramatic tasseled veils. Now she occasionally donates her 
couture clothes to the Flagler Museum in Palm Beach, but not im- 
mediately. She says she recently wore a five-year-old Givenchy 
to the kind of black-tie dinner she attends at least twice a week 
during the height of the Palm Beach season. 

Summing up her life in her 1985 autobiography, Lauder wrote, 
without a trace of irony, that "living the American dream has been 
intense, difficult work." But she got it — the titled friends, the 
clothes, the jewelry, the houses. She got it, but she won't give up. 
"I invented gift-with-purchase," she says, even now, as though 
there is anyone left who doesn't know. ' 'I was awarded the Legion 
of Honor, the Gold Medal of the City of Paris . . . . " She made the 
trek to Moscow last November to open the Estee Lauder Perfumery 
on Gorky Street, and when her boutique opened in Budapest she ac- 
tually made up the crowds. "She did makeup after makeup," says 
an aide, "and personally taught her three-minute technique." Lat- 
er, when she and her entourage appeared at a Budapest department 
store, the customers were asked if they'd ever heard of Estee Lau- 
der. A half dozen turned and held up their lipsticks. It was a classic 
Esteemoment. "I love going to the stores," shesays, "andwatch- 
ing the people come in to see me. " • 



VOGUE FICTION 

(Continued from page 291) 

nothing, the sky goes darker and voices bounce off the tiny rip- 
ples. Courtyard beach umbrellas topple as folks dance to a porta- 
ble tape deck. A woman passes, bringing ice, and she isn't me. 
The night deepens all around Ricky Zachs. He watches the clos- 
ing of many numbered doors and finally goes inside our room, 
crams the pillow to his head. 

He is thinking of the time in second grade when girls held him 
down and filled his mouth with bark. He is thinking of the time the 
teacher wouldn't let him use the bathroom. He is thinking of me, 
how I'm supposed to take care of him, and he is planning how he'll 
throw me down when I come back. He thinks I will come back, but 
then he sees a cracked bell made of ft-osting, white and gUttering. He 
sees blond hair, a bunch of tin cans tied to a fender, bouncing, rat- 
tling, behind a hot red car that speeds away and disappears. He 
tosses and turns but he is unable to sleep. As more people and more 
people join the party below he grows furious. Their voices are sod- 
den and raucous while his is beautiful, or was, for as the night wears 
on he feels the rich sound rusting. • 



THE REAL I VAN A 

(Continuedfrom page 251) 

cure and not shy with company. I am very firm about the table 
manners. They have terrific table manners. I never allow toys at 
the table and I never allow the radio or television on at meals. " 
She didn^t say "we" much when she talked about her children. 

She is proud of their achievements. Donny, she says, is com- 
pletely fluent in Czech now. "He goes camping in Czechoslova- 
kia each year, just on his own with his grandfather. We have a 
house there in the mountains and Donny and my father fish in the 
streams and pick the mushrooms. " And Ivanka? She auditioned 
for the School of American Ballet. "I didn't go with her to the 
audition," Ivana said. "I didn't want to put on the pressure, so 
one of the nannies went. I thought if she knew I was there, she 
will think it was something important to me. But she was accept- 
ed for classes. And at Christmas all the girls at the school were 
auditioned for The Nutcracker Suite and she was chosen for that! 
She danced in public! for six weeks! at the Lincoln Center!" At 
this point Ivana's eyes danced and she became completely alive. 
Did she go to see Ivanka performing in The Nutcrackerl "Of 
course! Many times! And all the family, and my friends, and her 
friends, and my mother and father." 

On Ivana's desk is a thick file of letters. More arrive every day 
from all over America and Europe. They fill a room at the Plaza. 
Some of the letters are written on schoolbook-lined paper, in 
careful print, by people who aren't used to writing letters. Some 
are in verse. Sixty jjercent are from women, forty percent from 
men, and all the letters — at least the ones that end up on her 
desk — are wildly supportive of Mrs. Trump. She feels "incredi- 
ble support" from them. 

I wanted her to talk about her future. She has started work on 
licensing the Ivana Collection, "for the woman who is striving 
for excellence in everything she does; for the woman who knows 
who she is." The plans are very ambitious — Ivana clothes for 
evening, business, and casual wear, Ivana luggage, Ivana shoes, 
Ivana lingerie, Ivana handbags, Ivana hosiery, Ivana jewelry — 
but the ideas are sound. There'll be an Executive Collection of 
items for the businesswoman, for example: briefcases, appoint- 
ment books, and portfolios that match bags in the handbag range. 

She can't envision a future without work. "It's a question of 
upbringing. I am Czech. Czechs are hardworking; everybody 
works in Czechoslovakia, women as well as men. My mother al- 
ways worked; I will always work." 

I wanted her to talk about her marriage, but she wouldn't. 
Couldn't. Her situation was altering daily, hourly. 

Finally she said this: "I have always been optimistic about 
life. And I believe my children and I will be fine." 

Ivana Trump is coming out of her nightmare. And learning to 
say "I."» 

TOFU GUYS DON'T EAT MEAT 

(Continuedfrom page 286) 

wrong. I mean . . . Save the World. 

As it happens, he did give me a long riff on God ("or Supreme 
Being or Life Force , call it what you will" ) , but you don' t want to 
read it here. (I'm an atheist, I said. "Good move!" said River, 
with tact and charm.) We talked about trees. He wanted to write 
something down in my notebook and I flicked the page over so he 
couldn't see what I'd been writing about him. "Tsk tsk!" he 
said. "You could 've used that bottom half. You shouldn't waste 
paper." Why not? "Why not? Because trees are a diminishing 
resource, that's why not. The American Forest Council ran an ad 
saying that we have 40 percent more trees in America now than 
we had eighty years ago. Sure! Yeah — in the form of toilet paper 
and used paper cups ! In fact, we cut down an area the size of Con- 
necticut every year. The Forest Service plants trees, sure, but for 
wood pulp. I think wood pulp should only be used for writing ma- 



324 



V O G I E M A >• 19 9 



terials. People waste so much paper. In every 
hardware store, you get acres of paper for ev- 
ery receipt. Three copies of all this crap — sure- 
ly our technology is more advanced than this! I 
mean, if they can make a plutonium generator 
that will orbit Jupiter and stay out there for for- 
ty-three years, surely they can make a receipt 
that will save paper." 

River became pretty intense about orbiting 
Jupiter: "Drives me nuts! We have amazing 
superpower technology that will now never 
need to be devoted to. . .to arms, and instead 
of putting the money into building safe sewers 
and protecting the groundwater, they . . . they 
. . .can't even make a damn birth control de- 
vice that will limit the world's population. ' ' 

Now, hang on a minute. How many brothers 
and sisters have you. River? Four, is it? Five of 
you altogether? Uh, not much population limit- 
ing going on here. His eyes opened up, but he 
took it on the chin. "My family," he said care- 
fully, "don't waste the world's resources. We 
eat what we grow, we don't exploit animals, we 
use up less than our share of electricity and pow- 
er, we have solar heating, we aren't materialis- 
tic . ..." It was a spirited defense, and I thought 
he was sweet, and we changed the subject. 

The waitress brought us a small bill (on a 
small piece of paper). "Let's go to the smoke 
shop," said River. He has to smoke in Dog- 
fight (and presumably shave, too), so he's 
practicing. Gainesville's smoke shop is a won- 
derful place, tall and airy with aluminum ash- 
trays and racks of books. 1 asked River what he 
was reading at the moment and he said , " Noth- 
ing"; he was busy with his music; he liked 
reading, though; he was always looking for 
good books; he liked big, universal themes; 
something that told him something large-scale 
about the human condition . Did I have any rec- 
ommendations? he asked with artful flattery, 
head to one side. He'd really appreciate my 
advice. Oh, mercy. I went totally blank. 
Er . . . War and Peace? The nice old guy in 
the smoke shop went off on a long search and 
came up with a dusty copy. River said it 
looked great. And big. We bought it. 

Every time we crossed a street, some little 
person popped up to say, Hey, Riv! and River 
would cross over to slap him on the arm and say 
Hey! back. None of the hailers were crop- 
headed, and they weren't wearing bermudas: 
River's friends aren't among the thirty-five 
thousand college kids of Gainesville; they're 
the cool dudes. Musicians, mainly. They're all 
terrifically polite, just like him. River's in a 
band, too; he loves it. He writes songs and 
plays guitar. It's called Aleka's Attic, and Is- 
land Records is very interested in it. One of his 
friends told me that he changes the band's 
name periodically "so that people will go 
along to see the whole band, not to see River 
Phoenix." River told me that he'd actually 
toyed with the idea of calling himself some- 
thing else for musical purposes. 

We hung out all day. We hung out at the veg- 
etarian lunch place, where we ate falafel and 
tahini, and a blushing girl asked River for his 
autograph. We hung out at Gainesville's sound 
studio, where River picked up fifty copies of 



the tape of his new song and asked the engineer 
to play it for me on the studio equipment. It 
came soaring out , full of guitars and drums , but 
River said it wasn't loud enough. We hung out 
at a frat party in one of the millions of frat 
houses that run through the center of Gaines- 
ville. That was weird. Lots of cheerful kids of 
River's age and with River's dress sense were 
setting up amps and drum kits to play for the 
party, while the athletic denizens of the frat 
house sat around on their balconies combing 
their golden hair. 

We didn't stay anywhere very long. We 
hung out at River's house while Arlyn got a 
meal together for her son, me, and a twenty- 
year-old girl from England who'd met the 
Phoenixes in Mexico. The meal was radical- 
ly vegan, organic, animal-by-product-free, 
and delicious, in fact. Arlyn, a chunky, smil- 
ing woman with graying hair, explained to 
me about milk while she squished tofu, col- 
ored yellow with turmeric, into a skillet to 
make an eggless omelet. "Why should adult 
humans drink milk?" she said. "Human 
milk is for baby humans; cow's milk is for 
baby cows." It was unarguable. 

River clearly adores Arlyn, who does a 
great job as mother Phoenix . Her children are 
all beautiful and they seem as happy as 
clams: also busy, musical, drug-free, and po- 
lite. River gave me another long riff on 
drugs: he works in cocaine country, after all, 
on film sets. He said he becomes completely 
paranoiac in Los Angeles: "People look at 



you if you have a cold; you feel you can't 
blow your nose,'' and he can see the hand- 
shaking and hand-passing that goes on at par- 
ties. "I just stay away from it," he said. "I 
don't even like talking about it. It depresses 
me. The biggest thing that really gets me are the 
girls . . . because of being used, the way men use 
women. It really upsets me — the wonderful ex- 
tra-virgin-olive-oil young ladies, who are so 
wholesome and so together and their heads are 
on tight, and they've been straight, and they get 
caught, and you see them a year later and 
they're" — River puts on a blank, empty face and 
round, blank eyes — "and all they've got left is 
just a recorded message in their heads." He was 
very earnest about this. Then he listened to his 
own earnestness, said, "Uh-oh, I'm going to se- 
gue out of this," put on another face, and 
drawled, "Nancy's said it all for me, anyway. 
Just say no." I thought the whole performance 
was really endearing. 

The last place we hung out was with some 
very laid-back musicians. River bounced up 
the steps of a frame house on Gainesville's 
main street and said, "Hi, guys." The guys 
said hi and looked at me. River looked at me, 
too, and was socially wrong-footed for the 
first time in a long day. "This is. . .my 
aunt," he said. "From England." The guys 
said hi. As we left. River grabbed my arm 
and said, "Sorry about the aunt bit. I'll ex- 
plain it to them later. ' ' He gave me a big kiss 
and drove me back to the hotel. I was 
charmed. • 



VOGUE MAY 1990 



325 




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IN THIS ISSUE 



Details, prices, more stores, more . 



Page 4: For information on jacket and hat see 
pages 234-235. 6: (cover): Belt at Elizabeth Ar- 
denThe Salon, Washington DC; Neiman Marcus. 
76: Top left: linen jacket, S325, and skirt, $150, 
Marc Jacobs for Perry Ellis. Saks Fifth Avenue; I. 
Magnin. Sunglasses, Perry Ellis Eyewear. 
Scarves, Perry Ellis. Top right: cotton jacket, top, 
and pants, Chloe. Patricia Morange, Beverly 
Hills. Earrings and bracelet, Isabel Canovas. Isa- 
bel Canovas Boutique, NYC. Watch, Bulova, 
Macy's Herald Square. Shoes, Manolo Blahnik. 
Bergdorf Goodman. Bottom right: bags, $32 
each. J. Crew, NYC, Costa Mesa CA. Sunglass- 
es, James Arpad, S325. Bergdorf Goodman; Roz 
& Sherm, Birmingham MI. Shalimar Gloves. 
Scarf, John Jacobus New York. 81: 1) Coat, 
Claude Montana. 3) Silk and satin coat, $1 ,200. 
Bergdorf Goodman. 4) Linen coat, 5520. Bloom- 




Location notes: Funzi Island, Kenya 

Funzi Island Fishing Club, forty-five 
miles south of Mombasa on Kenya's Indi- 
an Ocean coast, is the exotic backdrop for 
Vogue's "Tropical Whites" story. On the 
edge of one of the world's richest Fishing 
banks, Funzi lures world-class anglers — 
never more than twelve at one time — who 
stay in large tents with private outhouses 
and outdoor showers where the water is 
heated over a campfire. For those who 
don't fish, Funzi has beaches, swimming, 
windsurfing, waterskiing. It's an idyllic 
place to wind down after a safari. Write 
P.O. Box 90246, Mombasa, Kenya; or 
telex 21126. For information on Kenya 
safaris and tour packages that can include 
Funzi Island, contact Abercrombie & 
Kent at (708) 954-2944. 

To get to Kenya from North America, 
British Airways has daily service to Nai- 
robi (via London) from twenty-two gate- 
ways: Boston, Chicago, New York, 
Newark, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Wash- 
ington DC, Miami, Tampa, Orlando. At- 
lanta. Houston. Dallas-Fort Worth. 
Detroit, Los Angeles, San Diego, San 
Francisco, Seattle, Anchorage, Montreal, 
Toronto, and Vancouver. From Nairobi, 
Mombasa is a forty-five-minute hop on 
Kenya Airways. For further information, 
see your travel agent or page 2 1 2; also call 
British Airways at (800) AIR- WAYS. 



326 




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IN THIS ISSUE 



ingdale's; Adrienne Vittadini Boutique, San 
Francisco. 5) Silk satin coat, $1 ,750. I. Magnin. 
100: 2) Cotton and Lycra top, $ 1 95, and leggings, 
$95. Martha International, NYC; Tootsies, Hous- 
ton. Galo Shoes, NYC. 3) Cotton twill jacket. 




$325. Cotton and Lycra cardigan, $135, and 
pants, $125. Bergdorf Goodman. Jacket also at 
Marshall Field's. 4) All pieces, Randolph Duke. 
106: 1) Silk and viscose blend blazer, $350, 
pants, $155, and raincoat, $350. Martha Interna- 
tional, NYC. Raincoat and pants also at Macy's, 
San Francisco. 3) Cotton and Lycra turtleneck, 
$105, and skirt, $85. Macy's Herald Square. Cot- 
ton twill blazer, $305 . Marshall Field's. 4) Cotton 
romper, $142. Saks Fifth Avenue. 116: Cotton 
twill jacket, $285, coat, $400. Cotton and Lycra 
cat suit, $152. Henri Bendel. 122: 1) Hat, Yves 
Saint Laurent. 3) Hat, $325. Bloomingdale's; 
Ecru, Los Angeles. 4) Hat, $275. Martha, NYC; 
Neiman Marcus. 6) Hat, $180. Polo/Ralph 
Lauren, NYC, Denver. 126: Top inset: bikini, 
Gottex. Hat, Eric Javits. Shoes, Manolo Blahnik. 
129: Cotton shirt, $50. Bloomingdale's; Bur- 
dines. 132: Scarf, John Jacobus New York. 
Bracelet, Roxanne Assoulin. 146: Left: earrings, 
Isaac Manevitz for Ben-Amun. Shoes, Prada. 
Right: dress, Suzana Monacella. Earrings and 
necklace, Isaac Manevitz for Ben-Amun. 147: 
Left: dress, Oscar de la Renta Center: dress, 
Yves Saint Laurent Rive Gauche. Right: suit. 
Collection by Ralph Lauren. 168: Left: cotton 
jacket, $86. Bloomingdale's. Jeans, Levi's Wom- 
enswear. Right: jacket, see above. Cotton lace 
with rayon braid dress, $950. Saks Fifth Avenue. 

Tropical whites 

229: Cotton piqud skirt. Suit also at Neiman Mar- 
cus. Hat, Hat Attack. Scarf, Elements by Surika. 
La Carezza, NYC; Rafael, Honolulu. 230: Dress 
also at Jimmy's, Brooklyn; Caron Cherry, Bal 
Harbour FL; Gallay. West Hollywood CA. 
Shoes, Azzedine Alaia. Alaia New York; Empha- 
tics, Pittsburgh; Caron Cherry, Bal Harbour and 
Coconut Grove FL. 231 : Pajama set also at Dolly 
Kay Designs, Washington DC; Night Gallery, 



Chapel Hill and Durham NC; Enchante, Chicago; 
Polly Berg, Edina MN. 232: Hat, Hat Attack. 
Shoes, Azzedine Alaia. Alaia New York; Empha- 
tics, Pittsburgh; Caron Cherry, Bal Harbour and 
Coconut Grove FL. 233: Rayon and spandex bo- 
dysuit. Rayon skirt. Bodysuit also'^at Gitobet, 
Edgewater NJ; Caron Cherry, Coconut Grove FL; 
Gallay, West Hollywood CA; Alaia chez Gallay, 
Beverly Hills; Les Createurs, Canada. 234-235: 
Silk shantung jacket. Hat from The San Francisco 
Hat Company. 236: Shoes, Ralph Lauren Foot- 
wear. 237: Scarf, Elements by Surika. 238-239: 
Scarf, Elements by Surika. La Carezza, NYC; 
Rafael, Honolulu. 240: Silk shantung jacket. 
241: Inset above: silk dress. Inset below; bodysuit 
at Alaia New York. Skirt at Neiman Marcus. 242: 
Rayon swimsuit. 245: Rayon and spandex dress 
also at Caron Cherry, Bal Harbour FL; Gallay, 
West Hollywood CA. 

The real Ivana 

247: Shoes, Yves Saint Laurent Footwear. Berg- 
dorf Goodman. 249: Shoes, Manolo Blahnik. 
Manolo Blahnik, NYC; I. Magnin. 252: Shoes, 
Manolo Blahnik, NYC. 253: Hat, Valentino Cou- 
ture. Eyewear by Paloma Picasso. Belt, Paloma 
Picasso. Neiman Marcus. Gloves in tote, Her- 
mes. 

PuccI 

254: Silk chiffon blouse. Lycra leggings. Ear- 
rings, Jose & Maria Barrera. Martha Internation- 
al, NYC; Neiman Marcus. 257: Scarf, Emilio 
Pucci. Emilio Pucci Boutique, NYC. Earrings, 
Christian Lacroix. 258: Lycra leggings. Earrings, 
Gerard E. Yosca. Bracelets, Herve Van Der 
Straeten. Bergdorf Goodman. Belt, Paloma Pi- 
casso. Bergdorf Goodman; Nan Duskin, Phila- 
delphia, Baltimore. Shoes, Manolo Blahnik. 
Bergdorf Goodman. 259: Silk chiffon blouse. Ly- 
cra leggings. Earrings, Gerard E. Yosca. Frances- 
ca Girard, Manhasset NY, Boston; Swansons on 
the Plaza; Tootsies, Houston. Belt used as a neck- 
lace, Jose & Maria Barrera. Martha International, 
NYC; Neiman Marcus. Bracelet, Jay Feinberg. 
Ring, Kenneth Jay Lane, Trump Tower, NYC. 





Dress whites 

260: Rayon and spandex dress also at Jimmy's, 
Brooklyn; Caron Cherry, Coconut Grove and Bal 
Harbour FL; Ultimo Ltd., Chicago; Maxfield, 
Los Angeles. Hat, Studio Kokin. I. Magnin. Ear- 
rings and bracelets, Christina McCarthy. Henri 
Bendel . Shoes , Stuart Weitzman . Saks Fifth Ave- 
nue; Jildor Shoes, Cedarhurst and Great Neck 
NY. Shot on the Carnival Cruise Line's newest 
SuperLiner, Fantasy. 261: Eyewear by Paloma 
Picasso. Saks Fifth Avenue; Tootsies, Houston. 
Bracelets, Christina McCarthy. Henri Bendel. 
Bag, Chanel. Shoes, Manolo Blahnik, NYC. 
262: Cotton lace coat. Earrings and bracelet, Vig- 
neri. Bag, O'Dea. Shoes, Andrea Pfister. 263: 
Acetate and viscose dress. Necklace and bracelet. 
Bijoux Pellini. Bracelet at Bergdorf Goodman. 
Bag, O'Dea. Shoes, Manolo Blahnik, NYC. 264: 
Jacket also at Marissa Collections, Naples FL. 
Rayon and spandex bodysuit and shorts. Shorts 
alsoatEmphatics, Pittsburgh. Sunglasses, Cutler 
and Gross of London. Belt, Azzedine Alaia. 
Alaia New York; Neiman Marcus; Gallay, West 
Hollywood CA; Alaia chez Gallay, Beveriy Hills . 
265: Cotton and Lycra dress. Cotton poplin jack- 
et. Earrings, Christina McCarthy. Henri Bendel; 
Roz & Sherm, Birmingham MI. Shoes, Manolo 
Blahnik, NYC. Shot on the Carnival Cruise 
Line's newest SuperLiner, Fantasy. 266: Jacket 
and pants also at Calvin Klein Store, Chestnut 
Hill MA, Palm Beach; Tootsies, Houston; Bull- 
ock's. Sunglasses, J.Crew, NYC, San Francisco. 



328 



VOGUE MAY 1990 



Earrings and bracelets, Vigneri. Fini, Seattle. 
Shoes, Andrea Pfister. Shot on the Carnival 
Cruise Line's newest SuperLiner, Fantasy. 267: 
Cotton shirt. Rayon and spandex bra. Cotton 
pique skirt, to order at Geoffrey Beene — His 
World, NYC. Hat. Studio Kokin. Saks Fifth Ave- 
nue; I. Magnin. Earrings and bracelets, Christina 
McCarthy. Henri Bendel. 

Essence: a love story 

272: Dress with Lurex lace, $2,450. Razook's, 
Greenwich CT; Suzy, Great Neck NY; Lou Latti- 
more, Dallas. Earrings, Jose & Maria Barrera. 
Martha International, NYC; Neiman Marcus. 
274: Silk bustier and brief. Lingerie on Lex, 
NYC; Goods Lingerie, Boston; Mima's Lingerie, 
Newport Beach, CA. Man's pants, Giorgio Ar- 
mani. 275: Earrings, Jose & Maria Barrera. Mar- 
tha International, NYC; Neiman Marcus. 
Bracelet, Verdura, NYC. Shoes, Susan Bennis 
Warren Edwards, NYC. 276: Earrings, Chanel. 
Bracelet, Verdura, NYC. Watch on man, TAG- 
Heuer. 

Tofu guys 
don't eat meat 

281: Cotton T-shirt, $42, and jeans, $54. Bloom- 
ingdale's. Macy's, NJ. 282: Viscose and wool 
jacket, $536. Paul Smith, NYC; Fred Segal Mel- 
rose, Los Angeles. Shirt, Polo by Ralph Lauren. 
Tie at Charivari, NYC; Alan Bilzerian, Boston; 
Maxfield, Los Angeles. 283: Cotton T-shirt, $80. 
Emporio Armani, NYC, Canada. 284: Cotton 
tank top, $9. Saks Fifth Avenue; Marshall 
Field's. Cotton jeans, $52. Bloomingdale's. Both 
at Calvin Klein Store, Chestnut Hill MA, Dallas. 
285: For stores, see information page 284. 286: 
For information see page 283. 

Dress for less: 
the new sportswear 

302-303: Rayon jacket at select Limited Stores 
nationwide. Silk chiffon sequined shorts, Jean- 
nette by Jeannette Kastenberg, $460. Saks Fifth 
Avenue; Saks Jandel; Martha, Palm Beach and 
Bal Harbour FL; Tootsies, Houston; Neiman 
Marcus; Capriccio, Scottsdale AZ, La Jolla CA; 
Amen Wardy, Newport Beach and Beverly Hills 
CA; I. Magnin. Necklace, Jose and Maria Bar- 
rera. Top to bottom: heart and charm bracelet, Les 
Bernard. Gidding Jenny, Cincinnati. Sparkle 
chain bracelet. Jay Feinberg. Saks Fifth Avenue. 
Watch, Timex. For stores, call (800) FOR-TI- 
MEX. Circle bracelet, Ripoli Trend. Twist brace- 
let, Trifari. Dillard's. Keyboard provided by 



VOGUE PATTERNS 

Page 236. Dress: Vogue Pattern 
#2479, View A. Sizes 6-16. Size 8: IV* 
yards 60" fabric. $12.50. Canada, 
$16.50. Additional information: dress 
can be shortened as it has been for 
photo. 





Yamaha Communication Center showroom. 304: 
Cotton jacket. Cotton jersey dress. Earrings, 
Isaac Manevitz for Ben-Amun. Watch, Bulova. 
Bracelets, Monet. 305: Cotton cardigan. Cotton 
and Lycra leggings. Hat, Eric Javits. Macy's Her- 
ald Square. Earrings and pin, Jose & Maria Bar- 
rera. Martha International, NYC; Neiman 
Marcus. Gloves, LaCrasia Creations. 306: Cot- 
ton and Lycra skirt. Necklaces, Yves Saint Lau- 
rent Collection. Bracelets, top to bottom: Erwin 
Pearl; Ripoli Trend; DKNY, A Division of Erwin 
Pearl. Gloves, LaCrasia Creations. Belt, Butler& 
Wilson, Los Angeles. Bag, Liz Claiborne Acces- 
sories. 307: Left: hat, Kokin. Charles Jourdan, 
NYC; I. Magnin. Bracelets, Erwin Pearl. Belt, 
Erwin Pearl. Right: cotton twill and Lycra jacket. 
Shorts also at Macy's, San Francisco. Necklaces: 



first and third. Jay Feinberg. Saks Fifth Avenue. 
Second, Erwin Pearl. Bag, Liz Claiborne Acces- 
sories. Shoes, Sam & Libby. Keyboard provided 
by Yamaha Communications Center showroom. 
308: Cotton and Lycra romper. Shoes, Galo, 
NYC, Hackensack NJ. 309: Cotton jacket, also at 
Isaacson's, Atlanta; Carol Rollo/Riding High, 
North Miami Beach. Nylon and Lycra swimsuit. 
Bathing cap, Speedo America. Earrings, Tacque. 
Accessory Place, NYC. 330: Top row, middle 
bag: at Mary Chancis, Fort Lee NJ. Middle row, 
left: Calvin Klein Accessories. Middle row, right: 
Polo/Ralph Lauren Luggage. Polo/Ralph Lauren 
Stores. Bottom row, left to right: bag at Saks Fifth 
Avenue; bag available in mid-May at The Gap 
stores; bag at Bottega Veneta, NYC, Beverly 
Hills. ALL PRICES APPROXIMATE. 



VOGUE IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC . PUBLISHED THROUGH ITS DIVI- 
SION. THE CONDE NAST PUBLICATIONS INC COPYRIGHT c 1990 BY THE CONDE NAST PUBLICATIONS INC. ALL 
RIGHTS RESERVED PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. 

Vogue ISSN 0042-8000 is published monthly by The Conde Nast Pubhcations Inc. . 9 100 Wilshire Boulevard. Beverly Hills. CA 90212. 
PRINCIPAL OFFICE; 350 Madison Avenue. New York. NY 10017. Bemafd H Leser. President; Enc C Anderson. Treasurer; Pamela 
M. van Zandl. Secretary Second-Class postage paid at Beverly Hills. CA. and at additional mailing offices Authorized as Second Class 
mail by the Post Office Department. Ottawa, and for payiTKnt of postage in ca.sh. Magazine Registration File No. 9013. Subscriptions in 
US and possessions. S28 for one year; $54 for two years. In Canada. $47 for one year. $92 for two years. Elsewhere. $50 for one year, 
payable in advaiKe. Single copies in U.S. . $3; in Canada. $3.50. For subscriptions, address changes, and adjustments, wnte to VOGUE, 
Box 55980. Boulder. CO 80322. Eight weeks are required forchange of address. Please give both new and old address as printed on last 
label First copy of new subscription will be mailed within eight weeks after receipt of order. VOL. 180. NO. 5. WHOLE NO. 3298. 
Manuscripts, drawings, and other material submitted must be accompanied by a stamped self-addressed envelope Vogue is not responsi- 
ble for loss, damage, or any other injury as to unsolicited manuscripts, unsolicited artwork (including but not limited to drawings, photo- 
graphs, or transparencies) or any other unsolicited material. 

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to VOGUE, Box 55980, Boulder CO 80322. 

SUBSCRIPTION INQUIRIES: Please write to VOGUE, Box SS980, BouMer, CO 80322 or call (800) 234-2347. Address all editori- 
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307 




VOGUE MAY 1990 



ue s last loo 



Editor: Candy Pratts Price 




t^ 



s^;r<A<rf. 



Adrienne Vittadini 


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Ralph Lauren 



The Gap 



Bottega Veneta 



Proof that tote bags don't have to look utilitarian to do the 
job-for summer there's an explosion of patterns and colors 



IT'S FRIDAY AFTERNOON, AND THE CITY STREETS ARE 
clogged with tote-toting women making their weekend es- 
capes. The variety is endless: a woman in a tailored suit 
sports a classic L.L. Bean bag while another, in head-to- 
toe black, shoulders a sleek Chanel. 



No longer limited to basic nylon carryalls, fashionable 
women are acquiring an entire wardrobe of totes. "Wheth- 
er shopping, running to the gym, or taking extras to the of- 
fice, the tote bag is," according to Adrienne Vittadini, 
' 'the one essential accessory for the modem woman. ' ' • 



330 



VOGl'E MAY 1990 





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iA^ON'T QUIT 



IS IT THE FUTURE? 



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nder the sun. 

Estee Lauder Sun gives you 
Special Protection Complex SPC. 



^ Now all our sunscreens are fortified with SPC;^ 
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may cause skin cancer. SPC^"* also helps neutralize 
over 907o of skin-damaging free radicals generated 
from UV light before they can cause lines— and it 
protects against sunscreen irritation. 





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Donna Karan looks to summer with a singular vision. Cotton poplin 
and cotton/Lycra spandex unitard; 280.00. Cotton poplin safari jacket; 530.00. 
Accessories by Donna Karan New York. In Collectors. 

Waihinjcon Ore(on California/UCah/Vir(inia; to order, call I -S00-69S-t000. 



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FASHION 

60 
Fashion clips 

By Page Hill Starzinger 

62-82 
Vogue's view 

No longer a remnant of the Woodstock 
generation, batik is taking design in new 

directions. . Liza Bruce, known for 
swimwear, takes the plunge into ready-to- 
wear. Page Hill Starzinger checks in. . . 
Stephanie Mansfield talks to Nan Swid, 
architect of postmodern tableware 

84 
Elements 

Summer's brightest mix-up: 
vibrant coral and turquoise 

189 
Point of view 

190 
Shell game 

At the hands of designers-tumed- 

beachcombers, even humble shells become 

sophisticated decorations 



208 
Fish tale 

As if inspired by the Little Mermaid's 

glistening scales, designers are turning out 

clothes and accessories with 

luminous surfaces that shine 

218 
The shady side of summer 

Believe it or not, there is an alternative to sun- 
drenched swimsuits and shorts. The look 
begins here — with muted textures and patterns 
made for soaking up the shade 

254 
Fast fashion 

Americans want clothing that's quick and 

easy. The Gap made a billion giving it to 

them. Jonathan Van Meter reports 

260 
Seeing spots 

The animal print that looks new: dalmatian. 

It's giving summer's important pieces the 

sharp bite of black and white 



Clothes designed for the shady side of 

summer — a shp dress, a T-shirt, and 

cotton trousers. Dress by Michael Hoban 

for North Beach Leather, page 229 



267-276 
Talking... 

Wedding gowns sometimes reveal the 

designers Freudian slip. . .Carolina Herrera is 

the undisputed queen of nuptial chic. Julia 

Reed talks to the mother of the 

brides. . .Candid couture: reaction shots from 

the fall collections 

274 
Noises off 

Great expectations: 
Tracy Young on prenuptia! agreements 

282 
In this issue 

Details, prices, stores, more 

286 
Vogue's last look 

When designers hit the beach towel, 
the result is a wild array of patterns 

► 8 



VOC; I E .1 I N K I ')')" 





The one-piece unitard with white cotton pophn top, black cotton/lycra® bottom, from the new collection, just arrived, 
in the Shop for Donna Karan on Boulevard Four, New York. All accessories, shoes, hose and eyewear by Donna Karan. 



VOGUE JUNE 1990 




DO YOU REALLY NEED TO KNOW ANYTHING MORE? 
THE 1991 ALFA ROMEO SPIDER. 

1-800-245-ALFA 




The legendary marque of high performance. 

^1990 Alfa Romeo Distributors of North America. 



\OGLE 




Karl Lagerfeld's outdoor summer living room, page 253 



BEAUTY & HEALTH 

88 
Beauty clips 

By Shirley Lord 

93-116 
Images 

Summer's sunglass chic. . .Jody Shields 

welcomes the return of the vanity 

table. . Jeannie Ralston on the latest methods 

of hair removal. . .Hair answers. . . 

Beauty answers 

118 
Fitness notes 

Outdoor challenges. . .indoor biking 

152 
Health 

Hysterectomy is usually performed not to save 

a woman's life but to improve its quality. 

Lynn Payer examines other options 

216 
Tanning addiction 

Psychiatrist Michael Pertschuk 

reveals why, despite the warnings, 

women are still not 

protecting their skin and sunbathing persists 

227 
The other side of summer 

The pale l(K)k; Jody Shields 

explains why untanned skin is as beautiful 

as it is healthy 

236 
The gene screen 

Already employers and insurers are using 
genetic tests to discriminate against people 
with the "wrong" genes, finds David Beers 



FEATURES 

28,32 
Masthead 



48,52 
Contributors 

58 
Talking back: letters from readers 



123 
People are talking about... 

Presidential resurrections. . .The spy 

business . . . Bashing the Japanese . . . Fashion 

mavens. . .more. By Julia Reed 

124 
Movies 

Almodovar: who inspires Spain's X-rated 
director? Doris Day, for one. By Tracy Young 

126 
Dance 

With his new ballet, Robert LaFosse pays 

tribute to clever felines and the legendary 

Lincoln Kirstein, David Daniel reports 

132 
Theater 

John Heilpem, reviewing A Cloclcwork Orange 
2004. considers the fate of British theater 

134 
Television 

As public television makes operagoers of 

couch potatoes. Cathleen Schine envisions 

Wagner's Ring in miniature 

136 
Art 

Two retrospectives prove the passion of fifties 
abstraction remains relevant, says Jed Perl 



144 
Books 

John Leonard reviews the biography of 
journalist Dorothy Thompson 

158 
Horoscope 

By Athena Starwoman 

164 
Food 

The seafood of the Pacific Northwest is the 
country's best, finds Jeffrey Steingarten 

174-180 
Travel 

Tess Gallagher discovers the gentle world of ' 

Washington's San Juan Islands. 

Travel News. By Richard Alleman 

183 
Living 

Gardens can be as high-style as interiors. 
Katherine Whiteside takes a look 

232 
Quiet rebel 

With his latest film, Louis Malle provides a 
living-room view of the revolutionary upheaval j 
that swept France in May 1968. Paul Rambali 

meets the director in Paris, a long way from 
the barricades 

238 
Queen of the beasts 

James Gordon Bennett visits Kristin Baker, 
West Point s first female brigade commander 

242 
The making of Dick Tracy 

Ray Bradbury recognizes the enduring appeal 

of Chester Gould's original square-jawed cop. 

Graydon Carter wonders what led Warren 

Beatty to don Tracy's hat and trench coat 

244 
The country girl 

Karl Lagerfeld shares his retreat outside Paris 
with a most unusual princess. 
Andre Leon Talley pays a call 



COVER LOOK For sun or shade — Con- 
quete du Soleil Special Bronzing Gel- 
Creme with SPF 6. On lips: model Linda 
Evangelista wears Le Stylo in Matte Mocha. 
Both by Lancome. Briefs, Vol Piriou. Head- 
band, Eric Javits. Necklace, Stuart Free- 
man Design. Bag, Renaud Pellegrino. 
Details, stores, last pages. Hair, Sam 
McKnight for Daniel Galvin at La Coupe; 
makeup, Mary Greenwell. Fashion Editor: 
Carlyne Cerf de Dudzeele. Photographer: 
Patrick Demarchelier. 



/\( Watcrforclwc believe gifts that enhance 
i[v shoiikl exhibit beaiitv themselves. 



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Every piece of Waterford' crystal displays what has been termed "an affinity for timeless beauty." 
With those you see here, that beauty becomes a daily event. W/'A IF RFC) III) 

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f % 



The Tiffany Tesoro. 

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Dramatize the event, then take a bow. Shown: long sleeve, wool crepe, turlleneck dress In 
wine with gold buttons and drape cascade. Designer Dresses, Third Floor, Slate Street and 
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3GIE JUNE 1990 



11 



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SAKS FIFTH AVENUE 




If purchasing suchWextraordinan timepiece for yourselt 
seems extravagant, get it for your great-great-grandson. 



The perpetual calendar watch 
from Noblia is an astounding 
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like every one of the distinctive 



tion, it confidendy carries the 
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2001.* Which means it's a timep I 
you can pass from generation t( 
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SPORT EDITION 



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models in this prestigious collec- 

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THE FRAGRANCE FOR MEN 




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HUGO BOSS 



DAYTON-HUDSON 



OGUE JUNE 1990 



15 



^■< 





AM KLEIN MEN 

ACCESSORIES 



AVAILABLE AT: 

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE 

NEIMAN MARCUS 
I. MAGNIN 
i^ NORDSTROM 
MARSHALL FIELD'S 

bullock's 
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Naturally Glamorous Blush-on 

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Our new texture is 
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Cindy is wearing Naturally Glamorous Blush-On in "In The Pink" © 1990 Revlon, Inc 



The most unforgettable women in the world wear 

REVLDN 



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VERY SAKS FIFTH AV E N U E 



TODAY'S STUD SET. THE PERFECT TEAMMATE FOR THE 
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A TIME FOR GUCCI 
Gucci Timepieces with precision 
ETA Swiss Quartz movements are 
available in an assortment of 
styles for men and women. Our 
model 3300 features an 18 Karat 
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adorned with Roman numerals. 
Available in a selection of dial 
colors. 



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VOGUE JLNE 1990 



IF PREMATURE 

AGING IS 
YOUR CONCERN, 

REVLONS 
ANTI-AGING IS 
YOUR DEFENSE. 



ANTI-AGING MEANS FIGHTING PHOTOAGING WITH SUNSCREEN.' 



Youthful skin's greatest enemy 
isn't age. It's the sun. Most of the 
early visible signs of skin's ^ 
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Revlon's ANTI-AGING 
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can delay this critical pre- 1~^ F 
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Its formula guards and A N 



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• Maximal sun protection. 
i • Continuous moisture pro- 

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• The exclusive CDC" 
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- * So, don't let your 

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A N T I -AGING Moisturizer, SPF 8. 



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\0GIE 




ANNA WINTOUR 
Editor in Chief 

Fashion Directors GRACE CODDINGTON. JENNY CAPITAIN Creative Director ANDRE LEON TALLEY 

Managing Editor PRISCILLA FLOOD 

Fashion Editor at Large CARLYNE CERF de DL'DZEELE 

Art Director RAUL MARTINEZ Executive Fashion Editor PHYLLIS POSNICK 

Special Projects Editor, Fashion POLLY ALLEN MELLEN 

Fashion 

Fashion Director, Accessoriev Shoes CANDY PRATTS PRICE 

Senior Editors GAIL PINCUS, ELIZABETH SALTZMAN 

Style Editor LAURIE SCHECHTER Fashion Features Editor LESLEY JANE NONKIN 

Bookings Editor PRESTON WESTENBURG 

Fashion Copy Editor PAGE HILL STARZLNGER Fashion Writer LAURIE DRAKE 

Fashion Associates SUSI BILLINGSLEY. JACQUELIN SPANIEL 

Assistants JONI COHEN, INGE FONTEYNE, ELIZABETH JONES. NATASCHA LOEB. TRACY SCANLON 

Fashion Copy Assistants KAREN BRESSLER. SALLY WADYKA 

Paris Bureau Chief SUSAN TRAIN Paris Editor LYSSA HORN Coordinator FIONA DaRIN 

West Coast LISA LOVE 

Beauty and Health 

Beauty Director SHIRLEY LORD Health & Fitness Editor MARGARETTA NORTHROP 

Beaut> Editor ELIZABETH COLLIER 

Health Associate PAMELA KAUFMAN Beauty Associate ELIZABETH BROUS 

Features 

Senior Editors MICHAEL BOODRO, AMICIA DE MOUBRAY. RANDALL KORAL. NANCY NICHOLAS Senior Writer JULIA REED 

Editor at Large TRACY YOUNG Travel Editor RICHARD ALLEMAN 

Features Associates ANNE ALEXANDER. GISELLE BENATAR 

Bookings Editor MAGGIE BUCKLEY Travel Coordinator DESPINA MESSINESI 

Art 

Associate Art Director SHEILA JACK 

Senior Designer NOEL CLARO Assistant Art Director SALVATORE KERNAGHAN 

Features Photo Editor ESIN ILI GOKNAR 

Design Associate EDMUND WINRELD Assistant LINA MAK 

Production Manager CHARLOTTE BARNARD 

Art Production Manager PAUL KRAMER As.sociate AMY VAN BERGEN 

Copy F*roduction Chief MARJORIE HOLT Editors SHERRY CHIGER. DONNA PERKINSON Assistant LAURA WASHINGTON 

Research Editor PHYLLIS RIRELD Associate SUZANNE GLECKMAN 

Reader Information SHIRLEY CONNELL 

Editorial Administrative Assistants VIDA GHANI. REGINA MAGUIRE. .MARIA MANOLAS 

Assistants to the Editor in Chief ORLA HEALY, SUZANNE BRATONE 

Contributing Editors ANNE BASS. ROSAMOND BERNIER. JOAN JULIET BUCK. BART BULL. GRAYDON CARTER. ELEANORE PHILLIPS COLT. 

GABE DOPPELT. TAD FRIEND. CYNTHIA HEIMEL. GEORGINA HOWELL. DODIE KAZANJIAN. STEPHANIE MANSFIELD. 

ANNE McNALLY. PATRICIA DUFF MEDAVOY. WILLIAM NORWICH. JED PERL. JODY SHIELDS. JEFFREY STEINGARTEN. R.ACHEL URQUHART. VICKl WOOD] 

Editorial Business Manager WILLIAM P. RAYNER Associate Business Manager LINDA RICE 

Editorial Advisor LEO LERMAN 
Associate Editonal Director ROCHELLE UDELL 

ALEXANDER LIBERMAN 

Editorial Director 



28 



\ O G I E J L N E 19 9 



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)( COVER GIRL* 



Christie is weorin 




The women 
who invented 
chic tell all 



For the first time ever, the best-dressed 
sexiest women in the world reveal their 
secrets of French Chic. All you need to 
know about building a unique ward- 
robe ...the hairstyle, makeup and per- 
fume nght for you ...the colors and 
combinations that say the most . . . how 
to dress hch even if you're not. Dis- 
cover &ie fashion type that fits your life 
and projects your inner self-image 
(Aristocrat, Femme Fatale, NeoClassic, 
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or Trendy) and use the specific pro- 
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Give yourself that Pahsian flair of 
sensual self-confidence— give yourself 
FRENCH CHIC! Today! 



Author Susan Sommers is an international 

fashion journalist and stylist. 

French Chic Is hardbound, with 224 pages, 

104 photos and 20 Illustrations. 



POR CREDIT CARD ORDEPS: 

Call Toll-free 1-800-453-7300 

Or to order, send check or money order 
for $15.00* (a 20% discount off the 
original price of $18.95) plus $2 postage 
and handling to: 

CONDE NAST COLLECTION 

Dept. 350041, P.O. Box 10214 

Des Moines. lA 50336 

•Residents of CA. CO. GA. lA. IL KY. MA. Ml. NY. please add 
appropnate sales tax. Please allow 4-6 weeks for delivery 




VERNE WESTERBERG 

Publisher 
BARBARA McKIBBIN Executive Editor NORMAN WATERMAN Associate Publisher 

Advertising 

Director NANCY LEWlNTER 

Manager DIANE M. WICHARD Retail Director WENDY TALBOT 

Beauty Manager DIANNE WALLACE Beauty Marketing Manager MIKE GREENBERGER 

European Fashion and Shoes KAY CAVENER Furs and Fashion SUSAN SCHWARTZMAN 

Health /Fitness Manager LYNNE DOMINICK 

Accessories and Home Furnishings Manager MARIANNE BUCHANAN 

Marketing Manager ANITA SAVITT 

Travel and Beverage Manager SCOTT FORD 

Public Relations Director SUZANNE EAGLE 

Merchandising 

Director DIANE HARRELL 

Project Director ELIZABETH GROVES Editor KELLY BEVAN Southwest Editor BEVERLY PURCI 

Coordinator MARL\ L. CANAL Services SUSAN HODES OLEARY 

Store Credits Editor DOLLY MORTON Associate DEBORAH MATTIS 

Fashion Marketing Editor LAURINDA FINELLI Associate JULIE KELL'i 

Promotion 

Director LYNDA GREENBLATT 

Art Director MARCIA WEINBERG 

Copy Chief JANE GRENIER 

Production Director DAMIAN CARLINO Manager MARY SIRI 

Branch Offices 

Midwest JOHN KELLY. Manager. 875 No. Michigan Ave.. Chicago IL 6061 1 

Detroit PEGGY DAITCH. Manager. 3250 West Big Beaver Road. Troy MI 4«084 

West Coast JOHN P. DEMOREST. Manager. LIZ MILLER. Acct. Mgr., 

9100 Wilshire Blvd.. Beverly Hills CA 90212 

CHRISTINE MATHEWS. Manager. 50 Francisco Street. San Francisco CA 94133 

New England ELMO ECKER. 350 Madison Ave.. New York NY I00I7 

Southeast MILLER & TILLMAN. Reps.. 4651 Roswell Rd.. N.E.. Suite 201-C. Atlanta GA 30342 

Southwest BEVERLY JAMESON. Metro Southwest. 3988 N. Central. Dallas TX 75204 

Rorida & Caribbean DAVID RUBIN. DBR Associates, 454 Alamanda Drive. Hallandale FL 33009 

Canada MPR 3 Church St.. Toronto. Ontario. Canada M5E 1M2 

Hong Kong HERB MOSKOWITZ. Seavex Ltd.. 503 Wilson House. 19 Wyndham Street. Central. Hong Kof 

Europe 

GARDNER BELLANGER. Associate Publisher for Europe 
284 Boulevard Saint-Germain. 75007 Paris 
SYLVIE McKENZIE. Account Executive, United Kingdom. Spain, and France 19 S. Audlcy Street. London 
MARVA GRIFFIN. Account Executive, Italy Viale Montello, 14. 20154 Milan 

BRITISH VOGUE Vogue House. Hanover Square. London. WIR OAD 

FRENCH VOGUE 4 Place du Palais-Bourbon. 75007 Paris 

GERMAN VOGUE 44 Leopoldstrasse. 8000 Munchen 40 

ITALIAN VOGUE Piazza Castello 27. 20121 Milan 

SPANISH VOGUE Serrano 3. 28001 Madnd 

VOGUE AUSTRALIA is published by Bernard User Publications Ply Ud. 

BRAZILIAN VOGUE is published by Carta Editorial Uda. 

MEXICAN VOGUE is published by Carta Editorial de Mexico 

VOGUE is published by The Conde Nast Publications Inc.. 
Conde Nast Building. 350 Madison Avenue. New Yori^ NY 10017 
Chairman S.I. NEWHOUSE. JR. Deputy Chairman DANIEL SALEM President BERNARD H. LESI 

Executive Vice Presidents JOHN B. BRUNELLE. JOSEPH L FLiCHS 

Vice President-Corporate Resources FRED C. THORMANN Vice President VERNE WESTERBER 

Vice President-Treasurer ERIC C ANDERSON Vice President-Secretan PAMELA M. VAN ZANL 

Vice President Circulation PETER ARMOUR 

Vice President Manufacturing and Distribution IRVING HERSCHBEIN 

Vice President Conde Nast Package NEIL JACOBS 

Corporate Marketing Director ECKART L. GLrrHE 



32 



V O G t' E J I' 





-^• 




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\ O G L E J L: N E 19 



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VOGUE JUNE 1 



Cartier jusqu'au bout des griffes 





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When you get back from King Ranch they'll see why you went. 



Spend a week at King Ranch, and 
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The person you can be ... once 
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CONTRIBUTORS 




Jonathan van meter 

Who better to report on The Gap's fashion phenomenon than twenty- 
seven-year-old Jonathan Van Meter, w^ho grew up spending all of his 
disposable income there. "NMien I was thirteen, one of my first shopping 
trips with my own money was to The Gap," he says. "My mother took me 
and I bought Levi's in many colors." Today Van Meter still lives in Gap 
turrienecks, T-shirts, and button-down shirts (that's just what he packed 
for the trip to company headquarters in San Francisco). "I can remem- 
ber being at a dinner party a year ago when somebody stood up and 
took a poll to see how many of us were wearing The Gap," he laughs. 
'The place is as much a part of my life as food." 

Van Meter, a beach kid from the seaside town of Cape May, New 
Jersey, got his start at Af/onf/c Ciiy magazine, "rampaging" with actor 
Dom DeLuise through the catacombs of the Resorts International Ca- 
sino, peering backstage at the Miss America pageant. "That's where I 
developed my sense of irony and my ability to look below the sur- 
face," he says. "It also made me suspicious of anything overly garish." 
Always in search of the invisible subtext. Van Meter has written pro- 
files of such Manhattan luminaries as Mark Kostabi, Pat Buckley, and 
Liz Smith for New York's 7 Days. "I like to take a magnifying glass to 
people who are in the gossip pages with small controversies brewing 
around them." contributors ^52 



48 



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CONTRIBUTORS 



\0GIE 



John leonard 

John Leonard, who reviews 
Peter Kurth's biography of cor- 
respondent Dorothy Thomp- 
son in this issue, used to be the 
editor of The New York Times 
Book Review, where he had to 
publish other people's opin- 
ions. Deciding after fifteen 
years that he would rather 
speak his own mind, Leonard 
became a daily book reviewer 
at the Times, as well as a critic 
for New York magazine, a col- 
umnist on politics and culture 
for New York Newsday, a 
book reviewer for National 
Public Radio, media critic for CBS Sunday Morning with Charles Kuralt, 
and fiction critic for The Nation. The author of four novels and two collec- 
tions of essays, including Private Lives in the Imperial City (Knopf), Leon- 
ard muses, "I've been reviewing books for thirty years. It's like having 
thousands of extra friends, all of them smarter than you are." 



James gordon bennett 




"I'm not dodging bullets — 
teaching is a different sort of 
pressure," says James Gordon 
Bennett, who interviewed Kris- 
tin Baker, brigade commander 
at West Point, forthis issue. Ben- 
nett is no stranger to military 
life. "I was in the army for a long 
time," he soys, referring to his 
childhood as the son of a colo- 
nel. His experiences as an army 
brat provided the material for 
his novel. My Father's Geisha, 
due out this month from Dela- 
corte. The great-nephew of 
James Gordon Bennett, Jr., edi- 
tor of the New York Herald, 
Bennett teaches creative writ- 
ing at Louisiana State Universi- 
ty in Baton Rouge, where he 
lives with his wife, Carolyn, and 
two sons, Matthew and the 
most recent James Gordon. "I 
also have a cat, Betty — she's 
named after the local paper's 
restaurant reviewer." 

52 




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TALKING BACK: letters from readeri 



Pretty package? 

To the Editors: 

The cover of the March issue of VOGUE 
proudly proclaims that "pretty makes a 
comeback." So has saving the planet. And 
the plastic wrapping in which my VOGUE 
arrives certainly is not ecologically sound. I 
hope that the articles and fashions in 
VOGUE, not the plastic wrapping, will be 
around for my grandchildren's children. 

Lisa Wolk 
Piedmont, CA 



Laugh on 

To the Editors: 

Thanks for your article on the program 
Blackadder (Television, by Cathleen 
Schine, February). I hove been watching it 
on PBS and just love it! But I have yet to 
speak to anyone who has even heard of 
Blackadder. I hope your readers will moke 
an effort to watch it. The comedy is so clev- 
er and Rowan Atkinson is hilarious! 

Anna Nieves 
Perkasie, PA 

Not a leg man 

To the Editors: 

Never have I read as disgusting a tirade 
as yourTolking Fashion article on Sir Hardy 
Amies (by Vicki Woods, March). My first 
thought was that this article was meant as a 
joke, but nothing in the article was the 
slightest bit amusing. Mr. Amies may have 
been knighted by the queen, but I do not 
feel he deserved to be given the coverage 
your publication afforded him. Who does 
he think he is to say "80 percent of women 
are knock-kneed. . . .Women's legs aren't 
mode to carry anything"? Clearly Mr. 
Amies is not fond of females. 

Jennifer Cone 
Bridgeport, CT 

Serve and volley 

To the Editors: 

Con there be any doubt that Steffi Graf is 
the most beautiful female athlete olive to- 
day? After reading your article "Graf's 
Dash" (by Ed Kiersh, April), I know the an- 
swer is absolutely not. 

Kudos to Ed Kiersh for writing a snappy 
little feature, but the real story here is Pat- 
rick Demarchelier's photos of Steffi the 
fashion plate. One look at her in a swimsuit 
or evening gown and it becomes perfectly 
clear that Steffi Graf has no peers, whether 
she is preparing to serve or preparing to 
party. 

Dennis Manoloff 
Bay Village, OH 

To the Editors: 

Shame on Peter Graf. In the article 
"Graf's Dash," he says he wants his daugh- 
ter to challenge Carl Lewis in a 200-meter 
race. We have a term in America for such 
an idea, Pete: hogwash. 

Mr. Graf has worked hard to help Steffi 
become the best women's tennis player in 
the world, but the most something like this 



58 



could do is thoroughly embarrass her. Lew- 
is could crab-walk to victory — if he didn't 
die laughing first. 

Daniel Anderson 
Cedar Falls, lA 

Well met 

To the Editors: 

I read the April issue of VOGUE and am 
writing to tell you how impressed I was with 
the fiction excerpt from The Music Room. It 
was a surprise to see fiction in the first place, 
and now I have another reason to look for- 
ward to each issue of VOGUE. Dennis 
McFoHand is a wonderful writer, with such 
on authoritative voice — I can't wait to read 
the book! Thanks for introducing me to a 
truly noteworthy new talent. My only ques- 
tion: why did you cut off his daughter's 
head in the photograph? 

Jane Longshore 
Birmingham, AL 

Correction noted 

To the Editors: 

It was with dismay that I read your Fitness 
column in the April issue (by Mary Roach). I 
am a classical South Indian dance perform- 
er and teacher, and I am shocked that you 
would put classical Eastern dance under 
the "very light" category of dance and then 
go on to state that some forms ore per- 
formed from a sitting position. The position 
to which you refer is actually a difficult low 
plie from which the dancer stamps and 
slops the floor in complicated rhythmical 
combinations. 

Kay Poursine 

World Dance Program 

Wesleyan University 

Middletown, CT 

Playing for time 

To the Editors: 

Your item about breast-cancer care in 
Health Notes (December) elicited an ex- 
cited response from the members of Al- 
pine Country Club in Alpine, New Jersey. 
The article mentions Memorial Sloan- 
Kettering's diagnostic and treatment cen- 
ter. Our members plan to cohost with 
Sloan-Kettering a fund-raising golf and 
tennis tournament called Play for T.I.M.E. 
in June to benefit the center. T.I.M.E. 
stonds for Technology, Immediate diag- 
nosis. Mammography, and Effective 
treatment, the best weapons in the battle 
against breast cancer. We hope more ar- 
ticles like the one in VOGUE will help fo- 
cus awareness on the issues that can save 
so many women's lives. 

Natalie Berkowitz 
New York, NY 



VOGUE welcomes letters from its readers. 
Address all correspondence to Letters, 
VOGUE Magazine, 350 Madison Avenue, 
New York, NY 10017. Please include a 
daytime telephone number. Letters may be 
edited for length or clarity. 

\' O G L I- .) L N I; I 9 9 



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B\SHION CLIPS 



By Page Hill Starzinger 





On top: the halter 

It may not be the biggest message of the sea- 
son, but it's one of the most popular. "It" is the 
halter dress, and it's turning up in Paris, Mi- 
lan, and New York — cut like a swimsuit 
with a high neck, narrow straps. The best 
versions: Beene's dalmatian evening 
gown; Mizrahi's short-skirted 
"apron.". . .Though every designer is 
creating anoraks, fashion insiders are buying 
Prada's, in light waterproof nylon, with an elasti- 
cized waist. The hot color: gold. 



The way to 
stay cool in 
hot weather: 
with a halter 
dress. TOP: 
A sixties 
original — by 
Pauline Trigere. 
Today's 
incarnations — 
above left by 
Isaac Mizrahi; 
here by 

Halston Made-To 
Order. Details, 
last pages. 

60 





The painter Raoul 

Dufy inspired 

Christian Lacroix's 

lighthearted 

pattern, right. 

Look for more grt 

prints for fall: 

Gaultier's ode to 

Pollock, 

Montana's salute 

to Dada, and 

Yamamoto's 

homage to Cubism. 

Versace and Henderson for half the price 

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lowers the price: by working in wool and cotton instead of cashmec | 
and silk; by using machine embroidery instead of hand-stitching. C i 
this side of the Atlantic, Gordon Henderson offers up his all-Amei 
can sportswear — plaid jumpsuits and hooded cotton cashmee 
sweatshirts — at half the price in a new collection named But, Gordo: 
It was inspired by the refrain "But, Gordon, I needed it yesterday: 
which he hears from buyers. Prices start at $44, go up to $500. 

Shoe report: for summer — blue. | 

For fall? TImberland boots I 




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check out thongs or basket-weave slingbacks in oceanic 

blues. Heightened by suede or metallic leather, the 

vivid colors go well with white.. ..For fall, the shoe news 

couldn't be more different: chunky Timberland boots, 

which young women donned in clubs this spring, are 

reinterpreted by designers. Ozbek's have metallic 

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61 



VIEW 

Editor: Laurie Schechter 

No longer a remnant 
of the Woodstock 
generation, batik-the ancient 
-/%,- Indonesian art of wax and 
;>)^v dye on fabric-is taking 
design in new directions 



^ 



' nBSoK. 



V. 



Yi 



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•9'^^. 



2. Batik on silk, the fabric 
considered a sign of wealth 
and prestige in Indonesia. By 
Giorgio Armani. 3. In the most 
customary batik fabric — cotton. 
By Michael Kors. 4. Batik that 
goes beyond the beach. Shirt, 
Sisley by Benetton. Jeans, 
Guess? 5. Sixteenth-century 
pattern, 21st-century shape. By 
Susan Bennis Warren Edwards. 
Details, last pages. VIEW ► 66 



Coinciding with 

the rise of interest 

in fashion ideas 

from around the 

world: the Festival 

of Indonesia — 

exhibits of art and 

culture — which 

tours the United 

States this summer. 

1. A surplus of 

ornamentation: 

gilded cowrie 

shells and silk 

tassels on 

a sarong by 

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VIEW 



h 




Out of the water and onto 
the street: Liza Bruce, 
known for swimwear, takes 
the plunge into ready-to-wear 

PAGE HILL STARZINGER checks in 



"THE STRING BIKINI IS JUST INCREDIBLY OLD- 
fashioned," says thirty-four-year-old Liza Bruce. Her British ac- 
cent is cool and confident, and she looks me straight in the eye with 
an icy stare. It's a stare her husband, Nicholas Barker, calls 
"throwing down the gauntlet." It's something Bruce does often. 
And it can be disconcerting. "If women expect liberation, then 
they have to respject that their clothes must change. They can't wear 
high heels." She gives me that look again, and it makes me ex- 
tremely thankful that I'm wearing loafers. 

Bruce has an emphatic fashion philosophy: if clothes are to be 
sexy, they must also be practical. "The whole idea of my stretch 
clothing is that it looks trim and athletic," she adds. "It's about be- 
ing confident in your ability to run away from someone and protect 
yourself. It's about being able to travel and chuck them in a suit- 
case. You don't have to press them. And women always seem to be 
doing the pressing." As she speaks, Bruce, who began creating 
high-end swimsuits six years before moving into ready-to-wear in 
1988, is wearing a true-to-her-word athletically skintight jumpsuit 
with a plunging V neck that reveals generous cleavage. Her long 
blond wash-and-weaj hair is left straii^bt and loose. 

Inspired by the " strong ' ' James Bond-type wom^i a of the ► 68 

66 



I 

I ■ IJF '-'^° Bruce's 

■ m^ design philosophy: 

■ Kw what's sexy must 

■ W also be practical, 
f 1. The athletic look of 

a swimsuit, in a dress. 

2. Practicing what she 

preaches, Bruce wears her 

signature cat suit. 3. Made for 

mixing: a bathing suit, rayon shirt 

and pants. Details, last pages. 

VOG I' E I I' N E 1990 







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VIEW: liza bruce 




1. Even Bruce's evening 

clothes are cut in trim, 

athletic shapes. 

2. Husband Nicholas 

Barker's input: a touch 

of irreverence to their 

design collaboration. 

Details, last pages. 



sixties, like Diana Rigg, who could slip 
on a sexy cat suit one minute, deliver a 
killing karate chop the next, Bruce says, 
"Those women were superfeminine, 
but they were also independent. 
. . Sexy isn't what you reveal, 
but how you reveal it." And 
Bruce means it. Her swim 
dresses, while provocatively 
cut out, avoid exposing 
"acres of skin"; stretch fabrics 
are knitted to add cling without 
disclosing intimate details. And 
customers understand her message. 
After just two collections. Barneys 
New York gave Bruce her own bou- 
tique. Says Charles Gallay, of Los 
Angeles's Charles Gallay boutiques: 
"She has a great sensibility of how 
^ young women feel about their bod- 
— sensual, not overtly sexual." 
Launching into her fashion and 
V^ feminism diatribe again, Bruce 
^ \ px)ints out that "since women 

\ have been able to achieve the 
\ things they were after in the six- 
\ ties, they can go back to glam- 
orous designs." All at once. 
Barker leans over and motions 
in the air over Bruce's huge 
crystal ring. "I turn her ring 
around to tum her off," he 
says with a wink. Bruce 
can tum the most mundane 
subject into a philosophi- 
cal discussion, and he 
knows it. Leaning toward 
me, Bruce smiles, a little 
girl sharing a secret. 

Barker, thirty-eight, a na- 
tive of Kenya with a penchant 
for pairing Savile Row suits 
with polka-dot socks and ties, 
knows Bruce's tough act is 
just that, an act to cover up 
"terrible shyness." And he 
often plays the clown to her 
straight woman. He also 
brings a sense of comedy to 
the collaboration, throwing in 
irreverent suggestions like 
"Why not tum the swimsuits 
back to front?" Once he even 



carted Liza off to a tattoo con- 
vention for inspiration. Out of their all-night designing 
sessions come innovative ideas such as high-cut legs 
(which Bnice pioneered) and silk-lined mbber used as a 
swimsuit fabric. The latest breakthrough: the modem 

68 



three-piece swimsuit — a top, bottom, and tube skirt that 
allows the wearer to vary the amount of skin she exposes . 

Liza Bruce was bom in 1955 to an unconventional 
New York family of style. Her father was a charismatic 
industrial designer, her mother a Rockette. Living on 
Beekman Place, with Garbo "down the block," Liza was 
used to being, according to her sister Robin, now a fine- 
art photographer, "set apart. ' ' Design and glamour were 
a part of everyday life. To suit the special clothing needs 
of his curvaceous wife, Bruce's father created custom- 
made Hollywood-style swimsuits and evening gowns — 
"all satiny and made of a very thick fabric." At thirteen, 
Bruce was trotting around Manhattan in head-to- foot 
black, painting and draping her bedroom in the same dra- 
matic color. At fifteen, she slashed and sequined white 
Mexican wedding dresses to wear to parties. 

When Bruce was two, her parents divorced. She hved 
with her father, who turned out to be a world wanderer 
and workaholic. "I was an original latchkey child," she 
says. "I'm very glad of that because it enabled me to be 
self-sufficient and self-assertive." Her freewheeling up- 
bringing is probably one reason why Bmce's approach to 
design is so methodical. "Liza never had a stable rou- 
tine,' ' says Robin, "so she creates one . I think that's why 
she loved boarding school — where she wore a uniform. 
She finally felt secure. Someone was looking after her. " 

Today , Bruce carefully controls every detail of her life . 
' 'Liza and Barker Uve in a very stylized way , ' ' says close 
fiiend Lucy Ferry, wife of Bryan. "A lot of care is taken 
over every aspect." A previous apartment resembled a 
grotto — replete with a seashell phone and sea-glass win- 
dows. The new London town house mixes African tribal 
couches with eighteenth-century neoclassical motifs. 
Both spend time collecting rare antique cars, including 
some British makes. ' 'We like to dispel the notion that the 
English are incapable of producing extraordinary 
things," Barker says. And just to "challenge mediocri- 
ty," Bruce carries a parasol at the beach. "It's not to 
show off," she explains. "It's to show people they don't 
have to be clones." 

Clones and conformists these two are not. Having met 
during high school in London, they quickly estabUshed 
themselves, Robin says, as "two rebellious peas in a 
pod." Bmce's father was startled by the seriousness of 
the relationship and maneuvered Liza out of Barker's 
reach, into a convent in Guadalajara, Mexico. Undaunt- 
ed, Barker withdrew his savings and jumped on a plane. 
"I scaled the walls of the convent only to be attacked by 
fifteen Dobermans," he jokes. "But I was there for sev- 
eral months before her father saw me. He was driving 
around in a white Cadillac, and he escorted me to the air- 
port, practically. He said to never come back. I came 
back about a month later, and he resigned himself to the 
fact that there was no way of getting rid of me . " 

Bruce and Barker thrive on challenging authority. 
"Anything that becomes the status quo suddenly be- 
comes mediocre," says Barker. And suddenly he 
sounds a lot like Bruce. • VIEW ►70 

%■ O G l' E J f N E 19 9 



w 



. L » • » 






OPll) 



r\'^ q/ 



}i^lNl^URENr 

SAKS FIFTH AVENUE • NEIMAN MARCUS • 1. MAGNIN 



VIEW 




Nan Swid has built a big; 
business by convincing 
architects to think small. 

STEPPiANIE MANSFIELD talks 

to the architect of 
postmodern tableware 



SEVEN YEARS AGO, NAN SWID AND HER PARTNER. ADDII 
Powell, invited a brace of big-name architects to a luncheor 
at New York's elegant Four Seasons. It wasn't a social lunch, 
although Swid and Powell had known many of the designers] 
from their days at Knoll International, the furniture desigr 
company. They had an idea. An unusual idea. They wanted tol 
produce a collection of functional objects for the home that! 
would be created with the same purity of line as a Frank Lloydl 
Wright building. Architects? Designing salt and pepperl 
shakers? "Most people thought it was a crazy idea," saysf 
Stephen Swid, Nan's husband, "but it worked." 

Since then, the firm of Swid Powell has established a solidl 
reputation in America as a purveyor of unique tableware andl 
accessories, enlisting architects and other well-known artists, such as thel 
late Robert Mapplethorpe, to expand its vision from the drawing board! 
to the sideboard. "It was a new medium," Nan Swid reflects. "Wei 
were very nervous. We had really rehearsed our presentation. You 
know, architects are always competing against their peers. This was a| 
way of joining forces." 

In the beginning, Swid says, "there were many mistakes." One was! 
Richard Meier's candelabra made of crystal, marble, and silver, ►72| 

Like Swid Powell tableware, Nan Swid's personal style is highly original — 
designer pieces, retro blouses, vintage jewelry. 1. At home Swid opts for 
jeans and a silk top. 2. At her own table: myriad candlesticks, china, and 
vases by architects such as Robert Venturi and Richard Meier. 3. No limos 
here: Swid has a chauffeur-driven black Jeep. 4. Husband Stephen gave 
Nan her first job at Knoll International. Details, last pages. 

VOGUE JUNE 1990 



a</A 



990 Fall Collecti 

br thertore nearest vou, call 1-800-227-5600. 




J^ 



\ 



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VIEW: nan swid 





7, 




which was impossible to reproduce. Says Swid, "It 
was so big it could have gone into the Vatican." The 
two women encouraged designers to come up with 
ideas on a slightly smaller scale. Their collection soon 
expanded from stark black and white Tuxedo china to 
frames and vases, many of which have been chosen 
for the Permanent Collection of 20th Century Art at 
the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Recently, Swid 
Powell introduced a collection of sheets, and Ameri- 
can Airlines commissioned first- and business-class 
china, table linen, and flatware for international 
flights. Swid Powell has also introduced a new restau- 
rant and hotel division, and its china can be seen in An 
American Place and the Quilted Giraffe. 

The partnership is a study in contrasts: Powell, 
a former vice president of Knoll International's 
eastern division, is a tall woman with a broad 



mile and an easy manner; Swid, formerly in 
Knoll's design and development department (hus- 
band Stephen was chairman), is a small, stylish, 
high-strung blond who, despite a passion for yoga and 
sessions with an exercise trainer, finds it impossible to re- 
lax. "I'm trying to learn to meditate," she laughs. "But my 
mind keeps running. I can't reach that subliminal place." 
Swid, who grew up in New York, Cleveland, and Chicago 
the daughter of a department store retailer, has a knack 
for putting people and ideas together. She is also known 
for discovering new talent, including celebrated florist 
Robert Isabell. "She can pull the best out of anybody," says 
Manhattan interior designer Stephen Sills, a friend of the Swids 
who recently redecorated their Southampton home. "She is re- 
lentless in the pursuit of perfection. When I did her house she 
was up every morning at 7 A.M.: 'I'm ready to go ►S? 

1 . When interior designer Stephen Sills redid the Swids' 
Southampton home, Nan oversaw every detail. 2. Sketches of 
designs to come: Richard Meier's silver-plate candlestick, 
Stanley Tigerman's postmodern silver picture frame. 3. Never 
content with the obvious, Swid sets a table with a grand mix of 
styles, including china by Steven Holl and Michael Graves. 
4. Even yoga classes with her daughter Jill, center, can't make 
Swid, a self-confessed workaholic, relax. Details, last pages. 

V O G II E JUNE 1990 



Make a difference in the way you build cars 



nd the cars you build will make a difference. 




Tlie 1991 Ford Escort. 
Designed and built to rival tlie best 
smaU cars in the -world. To describe the 
new Escort Sedan, GT and Wagon as "small" 
cars would only be partially correct. For 
instance, the advances in the development 
process were significant. The changes we 
made along the assembly lines were huge. 




■Ay:^^ 



And the differences this has made are 
thing but smaJl. In fact. Ford put togethe 
their global resources to create this 1 
cars. We put two billion dollars into desi 
and engineering; into state-of-the-art : 
ties; and into unprecedented worker trg 
Ing. The commitment is extraordinary. . 
so are the results. 



^ T 



Introducing a car that changes the idea tb 




Cars that advance design. 

A brief glance tells you this is more than just 
a pretty face-lift. Its sculpted exterior im- 
presses you with improved aerodynamics. 

This new thinMng continues 
inside, where youll be greeted by more 
passenger room (with room for five). The 
new Escort also gives aU five passengers 



more headroom. And the LX's clever split 
fold rear seat gives you easy access to the 
cargo area. 

But clever design is not reserv 
for the back seat. From the comfortable ci 
tours of the driver's seat, you'll discover a 
wider expanse of glass for better visibilitj 
and user-friendly controls at your fingert 



* 



With a new way to 1)iiild 

It was obvious that the business of 
the next Escort couldn't be business 
. And since ensuring quality work- 
ip begins with the people who put it 
ler, that's where we began. We employed 
Jive worker involvement in designing 
idual work stations, organizing special- 



ized work groups and streamlining the pro- 
cess. Assurance of quahty is the responsibil- 
ity of every single person involved. Because 
it's this kind of hands-on attention to detail 
that can dehver a world-class automobile. 

It's a process that's dramatically 
different. But then we wajited a car that's 
dramatically different. 





e only world-class small cars are imports. 



With engineering that's 
ally advanced. Not even Escort's dra- 
.c design can overshadow its engineer- 
ichievements. Let's begin with the exclu- 
computer-controUed 1.9L SEFI engine, 
Dnly engine in its class to feature Sequen- 
Slectronic Fuel Injection for improved 
ormance feel. A new independent sus- 



pension design, new front and reaj* stabilizer 
bars, along with a new rax3k-and-pinion 
steering system all axid up to a car that is as 
nice moving as it is standing still. 



The Next Escort 



Hi 



The 1991 Ford Escort GTl 
A new way to think about fun small 
GTs. When we started its design, we 
obviously wajited our new GT to master a list 
of performance goals on paper. But we 
wanted its performance to affect miore ttian 
the numbers, namely the person behind the 
wheel. In other words, get the driver as 



revved up as the engine. So we made suil 
that the functional equipment on the 
Escort GT would enhance its "feel" on 
road. From the engine to the cockpit, 
focused on the driver's performance as 
as the car's. It called for some very serio 
technology. But then, we were calling fo 
some very serious fun. 







Engineered for performance. 

Now for the fun part. Escort GT's aU-new 16- 
valve, dual overhead cam 1.8 hter engine goes 
from a purr to a roar in seconds. With the 
help of multiple-port electronic fuel injec- 
tion, it generates 127 horses at 6500 rpm, so 
the good times won't pass you by. 

The 5-speed manual transaxle 



was designed for the l.SLIs increased po"w 
output, and its sport suspension helps ir 
short work of challenging curves. 

Add to the hst a more respons 
power rack-and-pinion steering system, 
four-wheel power disc brakes and Gooc^ 
Eagle GT Plus 4 radials, and you can see i 
our engineers still believe in Santa Glaus 



Built to neiv levels of 
icision. Accuracy is all-important on a 
So, like all the other cars in the new 
ort line, the exciting Escort GT is put 
3ther with great attention to detail. Robot 
fders ensure consistency. Parts-handling 
lomation keeps components intact and 
jlemished. Reces have sized holes instead 



of slots for an exact fit. And because exact- 
ness is exactly what we want, we use sophis- 
ticated measuring equipment to confirm that 
parts meet design specs within four thou- 
sandths of an inch. 

So as you can see, we put as much 
high technology behind the car as we put 
into the car. 




Designed for action. The 

Drt GT's looks definitely put you iq high 
?. From the integrated air dam up front to 
spoiler on the back, the GT moves through 
wind as you move through traffic. 

Turning inside, you'll find a num- 
of interior features that are also locked 
> performance. A series of analog gauges. 



complete with tachometer, a speciaJ-grip 
steering wheel and firm sport seats make the 
inside of the new Escort GT as inviting as the 
open road. 



The Next Escort GT 



The 1991 Ford Escort 
Wagon. Big thinking in a new small 
vragon. We "began by reshaping the way we 
looked at small wagons. Practicality no 
longer ruled out style. Taurus Wagon had 
proved that. And the modern wa^on no 
longer had to drive like the covered version. 
Taurus, again. So, loaded with new design 



and engineering ideas, we set out to creaJ 
vehicle with enough room to leave not 
hehind but conventional thinMng. 

The result, as you can see, is nj 
ing short of extraordinaiy. No matter whi 
way you look at it; from the outside or fpc] 
the driver's seat, there's nothing quite llkl 
Which is just how we thought you'd like il 




And changes the idea that small wago 



- a 



Design with a purpose. 

Although it looks unlike any small wagon 
you've seen, the new Escort Wagon is stm 
very much a wagon. Its new design now 
offers more passenger and cargo room than 
ever, with room for five and a spacious 66.9 
cubic feet of loading airea (with rear seat 
backs folded). Access is made easy through 



either the wide, one-piece liftgate or the 
60/40 spht/foldback seat. 

A redesigned engine, suspensi( 
and a new rack-ajid-pinion steering syste 
make easy work of hard work. In fact, it's 
such a pleasure to drive, you may start wi 
ing the Escort Wagon couldn't carry so mi 
so you could make more trips instead. 



> 



With unexpected styling. 

tionally, small wagons have been ^yn- 
lous with the word "squsLre." In all its 
otations. But with the new Escort, Ford 
hrown conventional design yet another 
3. Or should we say curves? Youll find 
sleek lines on every side of this vehicle, 
iding the inside. 



The instrument panel of the new 
Escort Wagon blends smoothly with the door 
panels, offering yet one more example of de- 
tailed design. The front seats are contoured, 
so they're appealing to the body as well as 
to the eye. 

So from purely a styling point-of- 
view, the Escort Wagon is pure style. 




And built with dnrahility 
iind. The new Escort Wagon obviously 
nany strong points. And a lot of them 
n. how they're built. Because like every 
Escort, it has more rigid body panels 
stronger stress points for greater struc- 
support. We gave it isolated subframes 
luce vibration and noise, and more 



galvanized steel to reduce corrosion. As well 
as a m.ore chip-resistant finish at our new 
paint facility. So your first impression of the 
new Ford Escorts can be a lasting one. 



The Next Escort Wagon 





Have you driven a Ford... lately? 



I I 



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shopping . ' " The two would scour antiques stores for objects. 
"It got to be a game," Swid says. "Who found the best thing 
first. ' ' She also scouts antique-clothing shops and has a grow- 
ing collection of }-930s jewelry and vintage alligator bags. 
"So much of fashion, especially in New York, you see every- 
thing everyplace. It's fun to have something distinctive." 

Working in Swid Powell's East Side brownstone one after- 
noon, the same building that once housed decorator Billy Bald- 
win, Swid wears a Chanel jacket, gold belt, Giorgio Armani 
skirt, and Azzedine Ala'ia bodysuit. She reaches for a sleek Ron- 
aldus Shamask coat, descends the stairs, and jumps into her 
waiting chauffeur-driven black Jeep. 

Swid's personal style seems to reflect the sleek simplicity and 
love of good design that put Swid Powell on the map. "I think 
Nan has an inherent visual nature, ' ' says Stephen Swid, who met 
herat Ohio State University. He had grown up in the Bronx. Nan 
was an art major from Cleveland. "I started taking art courses 
just so I could speak to her." After his graduation in 1962, the 
couple moved to Syracuse, where Stephen took a job with an alu- 
minum siding company. Says Nan, "There was literally nothing 
to do. I remember somebody asking us to go bowling. For some 
reason, we knew bowling wasn't for us." 

The Swids moved to Manhattan. Stephen worked on Wall Street 
while Nan raised their three children. By the late 1960s, the couple 
had begun collecting art (they have a sizable collection, including 
works by Willem de Kooning, Roy Lichtenstein, Jasper Johns, and 
Ellsworth Kelly) and meeting designers and architects. When Ste- 
phen took the helm of Knoll International, he asked his wife to join 
him. ' 'Her design taste was impeccable, her sense of style was 'on 
the edge.' " But Nan wasn't so sure. "I hadn't been trained to do 
anything,'' she says over a salad at her favorite East Side eatery, 
Sette Mezzo. "But it was a wonderful break for me to go from tak- 
ing care of children to going out into the world. It also gave me a 
sense of self- worth . ' ' 

She was hired to bring in new furniture designs and work with 
the architects. But the other employees gave her a cool reception. 
' 'I said to Stephen, 'Nobody's talking to me. ' I remember Stephen 
saying, 'Just keep quiet and do a good job.' " Addie Powell was 
cajoled into taking the boss's wife to lunch. They've been friends 
ever since. "You have to understand," says Powell, "women 
moving up the corporate ladder had a tougher time then. ' ' But Nan 
was growing restless. "After five years, I decided another chair is 
another chair. I really wanted to do something on my own." In 
1982 she left the company to join forces with Powell, who had left 
to raise her child. "Whatever Nan does, she's always moving for- 
ward," says Stephen. Now a high-profile businesswoman. Nan 
Swid looks back on her days watching her kids play in Central 
Park. "When you get married very young and you're at home with 
children, you haven't had time to develop your own person. ' ' 

The high-powered social whirl doesn't interest the Swids (al- 
though Nan has chaired benefits, including one for AIDS) as much 
as seeing close friends and family and spending (somewhat) re- 
laxed summers in Southampton. She doesn't own a long gown, and 
at a recent black-tie charity event she wore a simple black Galanos 
cocktail suit. "I'm usually underdressed," she confides. The 
Swids have also recently updated their Manhattan apartment, using 
Stephen Sills. "She's a modernist at heart," says Sills. "But she 
also has the most incredible eye I've ever seen. ' ' • 



82 



VOGIE JINE 1990 



yrrrr' 



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It's protessionally reeom- 
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Diametress is a new tbrmii- 
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enetrate the hairshaft and 



expand its diameter, making 
each indi\ idiial strand the 
tliickest it can be. 

Tlie lather is so rich that 
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ELEMENTS 

Editor: Candy Pratts Price 



. 4 



ify^* 



•^ V 






Summer mix-up: bright 
coral and turquoise, 

worn in vibrant 
combinations, or as tlie 
perfect accent to white 



Paloma Picasso likes the 
way coral "plays oH 
other colors and mixes 
with gold." 1. Her satin scarf 
and an assortment of the 
best coral- and turquoise- 
colored accessories. 
2. Borrowed from the look of 
fifties brooches: a coral rose 
on a cuff by Henryk Demner. 
3. On the runway, coral 
becomes another addition to 
the pink palette. Suit and 
accessories by Chanel. 
4. "Coral is summer's newest 
color," says Judith Leiber. 
Alligator bag, Judith Leiber. 
Link bracelet, Seaman 
Schepps. Gold and coral 
necklace, bracelet, 
Dominique Aurientis. 
Details, last pages. 



84 




I* 



I 



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BEAUTY CLIPS 



c 



By Shirley Lord 

The Perfect Match 

If you think matching the 
right makeup colors with skin 
tone is as easy as a five-finger 
exercise, you're wrong. To 
start with, there are twelve 
basic Caucasian skin tones and 
thirty-five variations of black 
skin. However, Prescriptives, 
well known for custom- 
blending foundations and 
powders, has introduced the 
Exact Color Collection of eye, 
lip, and cheek shades, and 
says that through a unique 
color-printing service it can 
determine the best makeup 
colors for every skin tone. 
Prescriptives also guarantees 
that all shades in the 
collection (over 120) 
will have a lifespan of at 
least three years. 




A new trend— tools as colorful as 
makeup, like Conair's new psychedelic blow- 
dryer, the Wild Thing, small enough and now 
good-looking enough to travel in a purse 




Iff You Can't Lick it, Use it 

That's the new thinking behind ' 'cowlick styling, 
in which a tuft of hair obstinately growing in a dif- 
ferent direction from the rest of the hair — often 
around the forehead or on the crown — is ma- 
nipulated (and so somewhat disciplined) to be- 
come part of a style. Here, Bruno Pittini, co- 
owner of New York's Bruno Dessange Salon, 
layers chin-length hair, cuts rounded edges into 
soft bangs, and then swerves them dramatically to 
one side to keep the front cowlick under control. Says 
stylist Carlo Nickoll at Rene Hairdressers, in New 
York's Pierre Hotel, "A cowlick is no longer some- 
thing 1(1 , de; it can be worked with to accentuate 
the hairline — on short hair it can be 
brushed up to give hair a lift; on longer 
hair it can be softly waved. 



Lobe Job 

According to George Bren- 
nan, M.D., president of the 
Foundation for Facial Plastic 
Surgery, women are now 
plumping up their earlobes with 
fat injections. This to bolster in- 
adequate lobes as well as to re- 
juvenate those made puny from 
years of heavy-earring duty ! 

Sense the Heat 
In true Guess? fashion something 
totally different from a scent strip 
had to be dreamed up, according tc 
advertising director Paul Marciano, 
"to put across the heat and passior 
of the first Guess? fragrance." The 
answer? Infrared — scorching red — 

photography of Guess? model 

Claudia Schiffer, a technique used ii 

advertising for the first time, says 

Marciano, "to convey the hottest 

news in fragrance in many years." 



88 



VOGUE JUNE 19 9 



\ 









A love affair that never end^. ^ 



OPEN HERE TO 
EXPERIENCE OLEG 
CASSINI S ELEGANTLY 
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"This fragrance is my effort to syntfiesize all tfiat tfie most 
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tribute to their beauty and their charm'.' 




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A bit of sun is a good thing, but too much sun is a bad 
thing. Too much exposure to the sun's UV rays can cause 
premature wrinkling, skin sores, even skin cancer. 

Skin cancer is the epidemic of the 90 's. It has increased 
ten-fold, and in its severest form is fatal to one out of every 
four victims. 

That's why you need Sun Spots'," the early warning 
system for UV exposure. 

All sunscreens wear out, whether from swimming, 
toweling off. or just from the length of time in the sun, 



leaving your skin vulnerable to the sun's UV rays. 
Sun Spots warns you when your sunscreen is no longer 
effective, so you can reapply more for full protection. 

Sun Spots is easy to use, and you can use it anywhere: 
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IMAGES 

F^cJitor: Shirley Lord 




From incognito essentials to 
conspicuous-by-their-presence 
props, shades have become o 
great year-round glamour 
accessory, indoors and out. 
CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Dory 
Hannah wears a pair from h' 
collection of vintage sunglass^. . 
at the Academy Awards; mod^.l 
Elaine Irwin in cat's-eye seashell 
studded frames by James Arpad 
Christian Lacroix Couturc- 
gold-and-pearl-decoroted shad' 
on model Karen Alexander 
All that glitters, BELOW: 
Jean Lofont's shimmery 
frames — jewelry for the 
eyes. IMAGES ► 94 




Indoors and out, summer 

and winter, decorative 

'■'^ dark glasses are 

beccjming an important 

beauty accessory 



f 



93 



For females only 
a cherished 
beauty aid-the 
vanity table- 
is making a 
comeback. Here, 

JODY SHIELDS 

brings it 
up to date 




THE VANITY TABLE HAS LONG 
suffered from an image problem, 
dismissed as too girlish, too, too 
Miss Muffetesque. Beware: the 
vanity is making a comeback — in 
all its overdecorated glory. 

According to Brian McCarthy, a senior decorator at 
the venerable New York firm Parish-Hadley, it is his 
thirty- to forty-year-old clients who are demanding 
vanity tables. His hunch is that because this generation 
grew up without vanity tables, they're now making 
their fantasies come true. It is a kind of return to female 
roots and a recognition of the vani-y table as a wom- 
an's exclusive turf. 

Director Stephen Frears was right oi. ct in Dan- 
^erous Liaisons when he used a vanity tc in the 
film's last scene. Seated before her vanity, the i lined 
Marquise de Merteuil rubs off her makeup: in n.at 

94 



The various styles of the vanity. TOP: 
Table by Gilbert Rohde, 1935. above 
LEFT: The delicate jumble of NYC 
antiques dealer Linda Horn's vanity 
table. RIGHT: Vintage vanity: scene from 
the movie Wives Under Suspicion, 1 938. 



setting, her gesture had an intimate, intense power. 
It was during the eighteenth century, the time of 
the Marquise de Merteuil. that the vanity table first 
came into existence. Then called apoudreuse. it was 
a delicate, elegant, spindly legged thing, fashioned 
of cherry, tulip, or sycamore wood, detailed with in- 
lays and ormolu fittings. The tabletop was divided 
into three sections hinged over brocade-lined com- 
partments. The center section folded up to reveal a 
mirror; the compartment below held a brush and a 
comb. In the left compartment, china pomade pots 
were kept along with a powder box , a knife for re- ► 96 

VOGUE JUNE 1990 



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IMAGES: vanity tables 



moving the powder, rouge, orris root tooth powder, 
and boxes of beauty patches. The right compartment 
held an infinitesimal basin. (In England the style was 
adapted by the furniture maker Chippendale; ver- 
sions by Hepplewhite and Sheraton boasted secret 
drawers and concealed compartments. ) 

Blame the Victorians for the froufrou storybook 
style of the vanity, which persists today. The nine- 
teenth-century version was a small table over- 
whelmed by a waterfall skirt of flounced fabric. 
Drawers in the Victorian vanity held rose water. 




--^x 



.if*^**€!'^ 



-\ 




cold cream, curl papers, swansdown puffs, pow- 
der, a manicure set, hair pomade, and perhaps 
cheek tint. More drapery, swags, and bows sashayed 
around the vanity's mirror and its tiny stool. This excess 
ornamentation was in sync with the full-blown, overly 
trimmed nineteenth-century women's clothing. What is 
surprising is that this dust-catching, ultrafeminine style 
proved to be such a hearty species, surviving both Mod- 
ernism and Memphis. 

A backlash of anti- Victorian sentiment put the vanity 
table into a brief decorative decline in the early 1900s. 
Revived in the early 1920s — to accommodate the 
growing amount of makeup available — the vanity 
enjoyed a kind of second golden age. This time 
around, it was more lavish than the Victorian models, 
decorated something like a Christian Lacroix dress 
run amok or perhaps crossbred with a birthday cake. 
Double, triple, and quadruple decks of ruffles, scal- 
lops, pleats, and shirred fabrics cascaded around the 
table, made up in organdy, chintz, brocade, silk, or 
taffeta. The fabric orgy didn't stop there: draperies, 
bedspreads, and lampshades were covered to match. 
Even wastepaper baskets suffered the same 



Vanity, vanity, LEFT: Harper's Bazaar cover, 1943. ABOVE: 
Tabletop sculptures by jeweler Maria Snyder. BELOW: 
Table by Gloria Kisch, from Art et Industrie, NYC. 

swagged-and-ruffled treatment. 

Internationally renowned decorator Elsie de Wolfe 
created a more sophisticated version of the vanity in the 
mid-twenties. Her mania for eighteenth-century furni- 
ture led her to select Marie Antoinette-style vanities for 
her clients' homes. They were accompanied by carved 
and gilt-framed mirrors, Chinese paper screens, leop- 
ard-patterned carpets, and leopard-skin-upholstered 
stools. Other women simply reproduced entire dress- 
ing rooms from the palace at Fontainebleau, right down 
to the hand-painted floral wall panels and the coral 
and seafoam green color scheme. 

The modern decor of the 1920s and 1930s 
was a stark contrast to this historical indul- 
gence. Late-night old movies preserve the vanity 
table as a siren's shrine: sultry Jean Harlow-type 
babes in satin give their platinum heads the requi- 
site one hundred strokes of the hairbrush before a 
black and chrome vanity. 

Both the modem and the historical revival tables of 
this period were outfitted with similar accessories: 
brush, comb, hand mirror, clothes brush, man- 
icure implements, and scent bottles — usually 
all made to match . Because it was considered less 
than elegant to display cosmetics in their ►lOO 



96 



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MUSEUM OF ART 




Do your Christmas shopping at home with our new 144-page full- 
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and Christmas ornaments, note cards, posters, and prize-winning 
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The new Christmas catalogue will be mailed to you. Please send 
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THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART 

255 Grade Station, New York, NY 10028 



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IMAGES 



original, store-bought packaging, 
beauty products were hidden in small 
boxes or emptied into covered dishes. 
In the late 1 930s, the fad for matched ta- 
bletop accessories faded, and collecting 
individual unmatched items became a 
minor decorating art, and an earnest 
pursuit for some ladies. 

Another leisure-time pursuit was the 
"do-it-yourself project." In a burst of 
inspired practicality, women's maga- 
zines launched the vanity table as an un- 
dertaking for the handy woman or man 
in the 1930s and 1940s. General direc- 
tions: saw a circular kitchen table in 
half, place it over an unsightly radiator 
in the bedroom, and thumbtack floor- 
length ruffles to it. Dotted swiss and 
gingham — fabrics less intimidating 
than silk — were the skirt materials of 
choice for the homemade vanity. 

The vanity table was a necessity until 
the late 1950s, when it was dismissed as 
furniture fit only for teenagers and 
goody-goody types. Donna Reed and 
Doris Day are classic examples of 
1950s women who carried the torch for 
certain proper period customs: they 
wore hats and gloves, slept in twin 
beds, and, undoubtedly, made up their 
faces in front of a vanity table. 

In the 1960s and 1970s, the shelter 
magazines snobbishly passed over the 
vanity table; it was considered the un- 
fashionable furniture of an older crowd, 
including Coco Chanel! As late as 
1965, Chanel maintained a vanity table 
in her bathroom, described by John 
Fairchild of Women's Wear Daily: a 
long Regency table of mahogany, load- 
ed with twenty-five gold combs, 
brushes, and mirrors. 

However, the vanity table also 
thrived in Popular Science and similar 
publications, where helpful features, 
such as "Primping Places — Made from 
Shelves" and "Paintpot, Thimble, and 
Thread: Vanity Table Skirts," still put 
in an appearance. 

The vanity table's comeback today 
even has a practical side: cosmetics can 
be restored to their former place of hon- 
or atop the vanity rather than jumbled 
together in a drawer or medicine chest. 
As makeup and perfumes are packaged 
in increasingly decorative boxes and 
bottles, perhaps it's a signal of glory 
ahead for the vanity table.* images^104 



100 



VOGUE JUNE 1990 



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LINDA^EVANS 





It's all part of being female, 

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Learning fronn each other. 

So when friends ask me, I say, 

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My Ultress blonde does make 

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more beautiful, more "me'! 

But what really counts is 

finding the best shade of you . 

Ultress has it. Gorgeous, 

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champagne blondes. 

Look, the gel makes 

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<g 1990 Clairol, Inc. 



/*■ 



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7. 





f 



f 




IMAGES 



With the bare-skin 
season imminent, 
many women 
face the irksome 
process of 
hair removal. 

JEANNIE RALSTON 

investigates the 
latest methods 



I LOVE SUMMER, I REALLY DO. BUT EVERY 
spring, about the time the first no-jacket 
day hits, I am filled with dread. To me, 
summer means bikini waxes. Once every 
four weeks, or even more often now that 
most bathing suits are French-cut up to the 
rib cage and look like they've come 
straight from Cher's closet. 

Trying to stay bathing-suit ready in the 
hot months when hair grows fastest is an Claudia 

aggravation an estimated 80 percent of women deal 
with, according to Vivian Orgel, author of Vanishing 
Hair: The Ultimate Hair Removal and Skin Care 
Guide, which is actually an audiobook on the subject. 

No, it's not fun, this waxing thing, so each summer I 
reconsider the hair-removal options. 

Electrolysis is the method most dermatologists rec- 
ommend to remove unwanted hair, but first you have to 
find a good electrologist — and then be able to afford the 
price. Electrolysis is costly, between $35 and $100 an 
hour, and it takes several sessions. 

But electrolysis is permanent. The electric current 
passing through a needle inserted into the hair follicle 
kills the hair at the terminal matrix, where it is formed. 
It's also tedious, some find it painful, and many people 
with sensitive skin are left with little red pinprick 
marks, if only for a day or so. 

There's a valid reason that electrolysis takes so long, 
explains Lucy Peters of Lucy Peters International, a 
well-known electrolysis salon that offers a warranty. 
"A hair must be in the active growing stage to be treat- 
ed. Since hair grows in cycles, as many as half of the 
follicles are lying dormant at any given time." This 
means the same area may have to be treated several 
times to catch all the hairs in their active stage, and 
some hairs are more stubborn than others. 

After nine months, although I was told I was only 
halfway through my treatment, I quit electrolysis, dis- 
appointed that after spending hundreds of dollars on the 

104 




Schiffer in Missoni's sarong skirt. Details, last pages. 

process my bikini line didn't seem any less populated. 

I later learned that for the best results, dermatologists 
advise the earlier you start electrolysis the better — be- 
fore other hair-removal methods, like shaving and 
waxing, have a chance to distort the follicles. 

"The hair does not grow out normally if the follicle 
is distorted," says Diana Bihova, M.D., a New York 
dermatologist. "It loses the normal pathway, which 
makes it more difficult for an electrologist 's needle to 
reach the root." 

How do you find a good electrologist? One way is to 
ask for a recommendation from a dermatologist, who 
will usually know a qualified person. 

Only twenty-seven states to date require an elec- 
trologist to be licensed. Write to the International 
Guild of Professional Electrologists, Professional 
Building, Suite C, 202 Boulevard, High Point, North 
Carolina 27262, or phone (919) 841-6631 for more 
information. 

Depilatories smell — that's often the first thing peo- 
ple notice, and say, about them. It's because depilato- 
ries contain two powerful and pungent chemical 
compounds: sodium thioglycolate and calcium thiogly- 
colate, both of which are capable of dissolving what 
hair is basically composed of — keratin. The smell often 
worsens after the depilatory is applied because the 
thioglycolic acid in the compounds reacts with hair to 
create a sulfurous by-product — and sulfur is known for 
its bad-egg smell, which can increase if a depila- ► 106 

VOGl'E JINE 1990 



elebrate! 

1 of Olay 

r sensitive skin. 

e white , 

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Why grow old gracefully? Fight it 



IMAGESl hair removal 



tory is old or if it's been exposed to light for a long time. 
This is a good reason to throw away depilatories that 
have been around awhile. 

Depilatories contain a certain amount of fragrance 
to mask much of the odor. (Some scents are more suc- 
cessful than others.) However, people with sensitive 
skin may react to the fragrance used. 
(Nair recently introduced what it calls 
a nonscented product — No Offensive 
Odor Nair.) 

A depilatory can cause irritation if it 
is left on too long or if there are any le- 
sions or cuts, however microscopic, 
on the skin. If skin breaks out after a 
depilatory has been used, Bihova rec- 
ommends applying an over-the- 
counter cortisone cream or spray to 
reduce inflammation. 

To make hair removal easier in the bi- 
kini area, both Nair and One Touch by Inverness have 
roll-on applicators. One Touch worked best for me; I 
liked the scent and the product didn't irritate my skin. 

Results from depilatories last longer than shaving— 
because they reach hair just below the skin's surface. 
Two to six weeks is the normal life span of depilatory 
hair removal. 

Waxing lasts for a three-to-eight- week span, and 
nothing is as clean and smooth as a waxed area of skin . 
When the hair starts to grow back it's soft, not stubbly. 
That's some compensation for the ouch! of it all. The 
Elizabeth Arden salons (eight across the country) 
charge $21 for bikini waxing, and it's well worth the 
money because they are big on pain minimization. The 
aesthetician applies a thick layer of honey wax in nar- 
row two-inch patches, which she then zips off without 
too much trauma. To lessen the sting after each strip is 
lifted, she dips her hand in a bowl of ice and places it on 
the skin. At the end of the session she applies a cala- 
mine compound to the area to reduce any swelling or 
redness that may accompany waxing. 

Some women wax at home, but it takes guts. The 
hot-wax kits (in which the wax is usually supplied in lit- 
tle pots to be heated up) tend to be messy, and the oper- 
ation can be harrowing. Ripping the wax off fast 
enough is the problem. There's a tendency to go slow- 
ly, which prolongs the hurt and doesn't snap up as 
many hairs. With cold-wax kits, the wax is usually al- 
ready spread on strips of plastic that you simply press 
on and tear off. The cold variety is not as painful and 
gooey as the hot wax, but it sometimes doesn't pick up 
the hairs as well. (Two good ones to try are Sally Han- 
sen Natural Cold Wax Hair Remover with vitamin E 
and Ella Bache My-Epil cold wax.) 

Waxing, like electrolysis, should be carefully timed, 
since hair has to be a certain length (Vs to V2 inch) for the 
wax to take hold . 

Shaving is still the most popular way to clean up the 
bikini line, but it is by no means the best. If you shave 

106 



Waxing should 

be carefully 

timed; hair has 

to be a certain 

length to get 

good results 



the day you're going to the beach, skin will be too sen- 
sitive to bare to sun and salt water. If you shave the day 
before, the stubble may be back by the time you put on 
your bikini. Stubble is the drawback of shaving. It 
doesn't feel good, it doesn't look good, and there's no 
way to prevent it. 

Like waxing, shaving often causes 
skin irritation and ingrown hairs, two 
problems that are actually preventable. 
To avoid skin irritation, shave in the 
shower or apply a wet, hot towel to the 
area before shaving to soften hairs. Ex- 
foliation with a loofah or pumice stone 
can help prevent ingrown hairs in the 
shaven area. 

Many women use soap to shave but 
should avoid the deodorant kind since it 
tends to be drying. Shaving creams are 
better, particularly the new ones made for 
sensitive skin (Medicated Noxzema Shave for Extra Sen- 
sitive Skin, Clinique's Cream Shave). Many men rave 
about Edge by S. C. Johnson & Son because of its emol- 
lient, high-lather gel formula. Products made specifically 
for women , such as Soft Shave , set out to moisturize , too . 
Dermatologist Bihova warns against shaving first 
thing in the morning, when the body is slightly swol- 
len with fluids. Wait at least twenty minutes after 
waking up and then make sure to shave in the same 
direction as hair grows instead of against it, keeping 
strokes to a minimum. 

The razor you use can make a difference. I would 
never use a man's razor higher than midthigh. Razors 
made for women (Gillette Daisy) have curved handles 
that are easy to grasp and truly do seem to produce few- 
er nicks. The best razors (Personal Touch, Atra for 
Women among them) come with a moisturizing strip 
on the cartridge to lubricate the area to be shaved. Per- 
sonal Touch also has a comblike apparatus on the car- 
tridge front to make coarse, curly hair stand up for a 
closer shave; an "aloe strip" to help soothe skin has re- 
cently been added. 

Devices are new phenomena in hair removal epito- 
mized by hand-held machines (Epilady, with rotating 
wire coils; Emjoi, with rotating bands and a special car- 
tridge for the bikini line); either cordless or plugged in, 
they tug hair out at the root. 

I followed the directions for Epilady carefully: 
"Hair should be between Vie and V2 inch long; you 
should take a hot shower/bath first; pull skin taut while 
using the machine. ' ' It still hurt. 

The instructions for the Epilady Ultra, a three-speed 
device recommended for the bikini area, claim that the 
process causes less discomfort if the Epilady has been 
used once. A hint from a dedicated Epilady user 
worked: the trick is to wax first, then use the machine 
formaintenance as hair grows in. This, I found, was far 
less painful, and so far seems the best possible way to 
fight the bikini-line battle of summer. • iaaages^ii3C 

VOGUE JUNE 199 



Si 



NOW'S THE TIME 

TO GO FOR IT 

THE GREATEST 

LOOKING 

YOmrrtt/ER." 

- JACLYN SMITH 



MAX Ft^CTOR 





RAVISHING 
NAILS. 



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SMASHING LASHES 



Bye, bye shorties. Hello Stretch Mascara? Now your lashes 
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MAX FACTOR 

Jaclyn Is wearing New Definition Lipcolor Rich Honey and Diamond Hard Nail Enamel Sand Stone 



"NOW THAT'S 
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A BEAUTIFUL 
FINISH." 





Active Protection® Mal<eup 

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Slips on a clean, 

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Pan-Stik® Makeup. This mois 
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Skin looks refined, 
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MAX 
I^TOR 

■e 1990 Max FaJ 



iTJ. 



\ 



ATIHE 



1 




"After we got back from our first 
Canyon Ranch vacation, we promised each 
other that we'd never lose the exhilaration 
we brought back with us. 

It doesn't matter how long it takes for 
us to get back there. The Canyon Ranch 
experience has become a permanent part of 
our lives. 

Whenever anyone asks us why we're 
looking so terrific, we just tell them, 
'We're Still at the Ranch!" 



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CANYON RANCH TUCSON 



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ENJOY OUR 35% LOWER SUMMER RATES IN TUCSON. 




AT THE 



""Conyon Ranch was the most incredib 
vacation! I'm bock two months and I con 
believe how great I still feel. That's whc 
wonderful about Canyon Ranch — it reoll 
stays with you. 

They showed me how much fun i con 
just taking care of myself. I make every 
like a day at the Ranch. I'm exercising c 
eating right, setting priorities, taking tini 
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Going there was one of the smartest 
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ARP 



filter picasso's bedroom 

hagalPs garden, Bonnard's bath, for the most inti- 
late, revealing look V^H|[| ever offered into the hi 
v^esofthe great Euro- ^^^H pean artists of this ^( 
ntury, in their own ^9HH private, seldom-seen 
V^'* worlds, both van dongen at work and at play. Alexander 
Liberman, himself a renowned painter and sculptor, 
visited modem masters from j^JH^^l^ Giacometti, 
imi Dali and Dufy, to Rouault, ^^R^ Leger,Braque 
d Matisse, engaging them in candid ^^^^ conversations 

as well as pica$$o photographing 
their environments. And the book 
that resulted has established itself 
as a contemporary classic on art 
and the act of creation. This newly 
revised and expanded edition runs 
304 pages, 9"x 12;' p gf 
with 138 illustra- 
tions in full color 
and 73 duotones. matisse 





The Artist in His Studio usually sells for $60.00. 
As a (.onde Nast Reader, nou can have it for 20% 
less: $48.00 plus $3.50 shipping for each copy. 

Residents of NY, CA, CO, GA, IL, lA, KY, Ml, MA please add sales tax. Pleose allow 4-6 weeks for delivery. 

end check to Conde Nast Collection, Dept. 420109, PO. Box 10214, Des Moines, lA 50336 

rUE JUNE 1990 



ill toll-free 
800-367-7400 



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Introducing Complements" contact lenses. 



A NATURAL BREAKTHROUGH 
IN EYE COLOR CHANGE. 

Introducing Complements" colored contact lenses. 

New Complements are the most natural looking colored contact 

lenses you can wear. even if you don't need vision correction. 

The fact that this woman doesn't look like she's wearing 

colored lenses should prove our point. 



By blending complementary shades of COLORS ON THE SAME LENS, 
WE'VE CREATED COLOR CHANGE WHICH IS BOTH SUBTLE AND NATURAL. 



In fact, it's the only lens colored IN THE 



SAME WAY AS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL OF NATURAL EYES. 




COMPLEMENTS ARE AVAILABLE IN FOUR DIFFERENT COLORS- 

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Take care of your Complements with 



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REDKEN 




hair tips 

Natural looks, 
super-natural style... with 
Suspend ' Forming and 
Mending Spray Gel. 

^^^^^ unny days at the beach and sultry nights under 
^^^^^ the stars. "Summer is the season for casual 
^^^^^B comfort and simple pleasures," affirms Ann 
^^/^^ Mincey, Redken corporate spokesperson 
and summer celebrant. "When the heat is on, minimal is a 
must-lesser, looser, lighter looks in clothing and hair." 

© 
SUSPEND Forming and Mending 
Spray Gel was created with sum- 
mer in mind. Super-natural lift 
and take-control styling 
support-non-stiff, non- 
drying and lightweight- v^^.^1 
make it perfect for design- 
ing quick and easy summer 
looks. And when too much sun, surf 
and chlorine threaten to turn your hair 
into an environmental disaster, the 
miraculous mending power of SUSPEND helps keep your 
summer style sleek and strong. 

© 
For on-the-beach body building, just spray a linle SUSPEND 
on your hair-wet or dry-and comb through. Or apply 
SUSPEND at the scalp and hold hair up and away while 
drying. The result? A soft summer explosion of luxurious lift 

and texture. 

© 

For all-day summer style that moves easily into evening, spray 
SUSPEND on blow-dried hair prior to placing hot rollers. 
SUSPEND stays with your style — no droop, no flaking — 
even when the humidity is hoppin'. Summer styling couldn't 
be easier. 

© 

When the long hot summer takes the life right out of your hair, 
SUSPEND smoothes wind-roughed cuticles, tames fried-out, 
flyaway frizz and leaves damaged hair sort and silky Sprayed 
directly on sun-seared ends, SUSPEND restores shine, body 

and bounce. 

© 

SUSPEND Forming and Mending Spray Gel. Quick fix 
summer styling and ?i Jay, into-the-mght radiance-the per- 
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© 
FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO HAVE YOUR HAIR QUES- 
TIONS ANSWERED-write to Ann Mincey at Redken Laborato- 
ries, Dept. A, 6625 Variel Avenue. Canoga Park. CA 91303. 
For free samples of Redken Classic shampoos, rinses or 
treatments or the name of the Redken salon nearest you, caii 
1-800-542-REDKEN. 

CRedken Laboratories, Irtc 1990 



IMAGESl hair answers 

Are salon hair products 

better than those available in 
drugstores? Not necessarily, 
but there are differences 



"WHAT HAVE YOU BEEN USING ON YOUR HAIR?" ASKS YOUR 
Stylist, looking aghast. Is the shampoo you bought at your pharma- 
cy the culprit? Will the conditioner recommended by your friend, 
who uses only products sold in hair salons, solve the problem? 

In a recent survey, researchers at Vidal Sassoon asked about a 
thousand women the same question: are salon-only products bet- 
ter than mass-market products? 

The overwhelming response: no. There are good salon products 
and good retail products. Finding the best is just trial and error. 

There is one big advantage to salon-only products: the profes- 
sional hair-care advice available can make product selection more 
effective. Salon products are often inspired by hairstylists' real-life 
experiences, whereas mass-market products usually result from 
consumer surveys or focus groups held by the manufacturer. 

Charles Booth, founder of New York City's La Coupe Salon, 
recalls that his hair-shaping spray. Fixative Plus, came into be- 
ing after he had to restyle a model's hair twenty times for a pho- 
tographic shoot. "We realized that most women needed a quick 
styling product that held up well but didn't build up or remove 
shine when used repeatedly the same day." 

Until this spring. La Coupe's hair-care products could only be 
obtained at leading hair salons. Now Playtex Beauty Care is dis- 
tributing twelve of them at supermarkets and drugstores all over 
the country. Booth maintains that product formulations won't 
change without his approval. 

Vidal Sassoon products, now available in thousands of outlets 
across the country, were originally sold only in Sassoon salons. 
With the big change in distribution have come changes in formu- 
lation, "but only to meet the changing demands of new hair- 
styles and the advances of new technology," says Jim Hoskins, 
Vidal Sassoon 's associate director of research and development. 

"Mass marketers watch salon trends closely, but they can't re- 
spond as quickly as salons or small manufacturers, because they 
have to invest millions in advertising to introduce a new kind of 
product," says David Cannell, Ph.D., corporate vice president of 
technology for Redken Labs, the largest U.S. supplier of hair-care 
products sold exclusively in hair and beauty salons. 

Cannell points out, "Our products contain higher concentrations 
of ingredients (such as protein) than mass-market products; they of- 
ten need explanation, so we spend a great deal of time training styl- 
ists on how best to use them, information passed on to their clients. 
We, in turn, leam imaginative uses for our products from stylists. 
It's an exchange that can only help the consumer. " 

Philip Kingsley, who owns hair-care institutes in London and 
New York City, thinks a stylist is often a better judge of what a 
woman should use on her hair than the woman herself. ' 'Women 
need help in choosing the right remedies. The initial cost may be 
more than buying products off the shelf, but the end result is 
worth it . ' ' — LAURA FLYNN MCCARTHY lAAAGES ► 1 1 6 

VOGi: E J I NE 1990 



Complements"come 

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lether you wear eyeglasses or contact lenses or need no 
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lors Contact Lenses from DuraSoftf you'll want this 
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When you get your Complements, make sure you get them 
m the leader in the field. Sears Optical sells more DuraSoft 
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of Optometry at Sears can answer 
your questions and see if Complements 
are right for your eyes. These 
professionals are knowledgeable, 
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^ Only Sears Optical offers you the 
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jr Complements on our convenient SearsCharge or Discover 
rd. Plus, you get Sears Satisfaction Guaranteed or your 
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And to make your Complements come even easier, right 
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For contact lens fitting, a valid contaa lens prescription Is required. 
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OPTICAL 




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For contaa lens fitting, a valid contact lens prescription is required. 
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These offers may not be used in conjunction with any other discounts, insurance or vision care programs. 
Not applicable to prior orders Available at participating Sears retail stores. Eye exams are not available 
in every location. Offers not valid in Arkansas, Oklahoma and where prohibited by law In California, Sears 
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IMAGES: beauty answers 



With more to do and less time to do it, women 
want skin-care products that give instant results. 

Here, an update on their claims and effectiveness 



FOR MOST WOMEN, ONE WORD HAS 
become a key selling point in skin care: 
instant. Women want products that make 
skin look and feel better instantly, upon 
application, and cosmetics companies 
are trying to make it happen. 

One way is with a new kind of light- 
weight daytime cream with a molecular 
structure that enables moisture to be ab- 
sorbed by the skin two to three times fast- 
er than conventional moisturizers allow 
(L'Oreal's new Plenitude Action Lipo- 
somes Cream. Elizabeth Arden's Micro 
2000 Stressed-Skin Concentrate). This, it 
is claimed, immediately provides the im- 
proved skin tone usually only derived 
from long-term night cream use. 

Can fast-action moisturization really 
make a difference? Yes and no. ' 'Getting 



moisture into skin fast has never been a 
big medical problem, because skin's ker- 
atin cells absorb water like crazy on their 
own. One look at skin and nails after a 
bath is proof of this," says Hillard H. 
Pearlstein, M.D., assistant clinical pro- 
fessor of dermatology at Mount Sinai 
School of Medicine, New York City. 
"However, some moisturizers definitely 
work better in conjunction with makeup 
than others, so they improve appearance 
speedily. Other moisturizers are simply 
too occlusive to combine well with most 
foundations, so little is achieved. For this 
reason alone, lighter moisturizers that 
penetrate skin fast can be advisable. "" 

The "instant" advantage has real 
meaning when products give fast relief 
from specific skin problems such as eye 




puffmess (Yves Saint Laurent's Instan 
Smoothing Eye Contour Gel contain- 
cornflower extract, which the compan} 
claims has a quick decongesting effect b} 
improving blood flow) and sunburn 
windburn, or chapping (Lia Schorr'; 
Bio-Botanics Aloe Splash relies on alot 
to soothe skin; La Prairie's Synergel use; 
lavender oil). 

To reduce skin redness fast. Visage 
Beaute's Morning Oxygen Treatment i; 
one of the most unusual treatment; 
around and acmally adds oxygen bubble; 
directly to the skin. "The idea came tc 
me from oxygen bars in Japan, wherf 
people line up to breathe pure oxygen tc 
refresh themselves," says Roy Karrell 
president and founder of Visage Beaute 
"Why not an oxygen shot every day to re 
fresh the skin?" 

To produce that result, the treatmen; 
comes as a cream and a liquid that, wher 
freshly mixed together, fizzes up likt 
Alka- Seltzer and is "full of oxygen bub 
bles to be applied directly to the skin,' 
says Karrell, "in place of cleansing 
cream or soap. ' ' The mixture not only re 
moves dirt and surface bacteria, but aisc 
helps reduce redness or inflammation ano 
provides a clear, cool base for makeup. 

Some product claims go one step fur- 
ther and state that vitamins and other in 
gredients can help "rebalance" oi 
"strengthen" the skin visibly, while oth 
ers promise near-magical "firming" 
benefits. How seriously should we take 
such claims? 

"Not very," says Pearlstein, who 
notes that firming sensations are ofter 
produced by ingredients that evaporate 
quickly on the skin, such as resorcinol. 
alcohol, and witch hazel. These ingredi- 
ents cause a slight stinging sensation thai 
is refreshing and gives the illusion that the 
skin is tightening — but they don't pro- 
duce any firming benefits. 

Pearlstein continues, "As far as vita- 
mins are concerned, there is no scientific 
evidence that cosmetics containing vita- 
min derivatives have any benefits foi 
skin " — LAURA FLYNN MCCARTHY 



116 



VOGUE JUNE 1 9 9 ( 



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ALL FIELD'S 



FITNESS NOTES 



Women in the wild 

With environmental consciousness at an all-time high, outdoor 
adventure sports — hiking, canoeing, v/hite-water rafting, rock- 
climbing — have captured the country's imagination. Even v/om- 
en who feel a bit intimidated by the macho aura that surrounds 
these activities are getting involved, thanks to outdoor sports or- 
ganizations run by and for v^omen. 

Womanship is a five-year-old sailing school offering two- to 
nine-day learning cruises in the Virgin Islands, Florida, Long Island 
Sound, Chesapeake Bay, and the Pacific Northwest. Each boat car- 
ries two female instructors and no more than six students. "We 
teach women how to navigate, how to deal with the winds, but they 
also learn teamwork and command skills," says Suzanne Pogell, 
Womanship's president. 

Woodswomen, founded in 1977, is the oldest and largest adven- 
ture travel organization for women in the world. Two years ago the 
group mounted the first all-women's guided expedition to Mount 
McKinley, where seven members reached the summit; but Woods- 
women also aims to introduce novices to the rewards of adventure 
travel. Offerings include everything from weekend rock-climbing 
jaunts in westenn Canada and sea-kayaking excursions through 
Alaska's Kenai Fjords to luxury cruises through the Galapagos Is- 
lands. "Our trips allow women to take on new challenges without 
worrying about stepping on men's toes," says Denise Mitten, 
Woodswomen's executive director. 

Also responding to the new interest in adventure activities is the 
fledgling newsletter Outdoor Woman. There you'll find news about 
women's outdoor sporting events and organizations around the 
country, product and book reviews, personal reports of risk and chal- 
lenge, and commentary on environmental trends and legislation. (For 
subscription information, write to Outdoor Woman, P.O. Box 834, 
Nyack, NY 10960.) 



Sneakers: 
make 

Energy-returning. 
Torque-protective. 
Gel-injected. Air- 
pumped. Shopping for 
sneakers can be like 
taking a college course 
in physics, but most 
consumers are still at 
the kindergarten level 
when it comes to un- 
derstanding the basics 
of a good athletic shoe . 
For example: do high- 
top sneakers protect 
ankles better than low- 
tops? "The security 
you feel in a high-top 
shoe is real, but for 
reasons other than 
those you'd expect," 
says Douglas H . 
Richie, a sports podia- 
trist in Seal Beach, 
California. A high-top 



does height 
right? 

upper is not physically 
strong enough to pre- 
vent ankle rollover, 
says Richie, but it does 
give you a better sense 
of how your foot is an- 
gled in relation to your 
leg. Should the ankle 
begin to twist, the 
high-top upper will 
stretch against your 
skin; the instant feed- 
back signals you to 
correct your position. 
High-top shoes, say 
podiatrists, are best for 
activities that involve 
lots of side-to-side lig- 
ament-straining mo- 
tions, such as low- 
impact aerobics, 
basketball, tennis, 
volleyball, racquet- 
ball, and squash. 



Leotards to dive for 

Exercise clothes keep getting smarter. Case in point: Nike's new cross- 
training leotard, which is chlorine-treated so that it works in the swimming 

pool as well as in the aerobics studio. If s made of a nylon/Lycra fabric 
and lined with CoolMax, a fiber that wicks away moisture; you'll feel less 

sweaty after fifty flights on the StairMaster, and you'll also dry off 

more quickly after you've finished your laps. Available in black, red/black, 

and turquoise/black, this great-looking scoop-back leotard goes for $36. 

Stationary bikes: on the go 



Bikes that go nowhere can be boring. But now Life Fitness, 
the company that manufactures the Lifecycie, has intro- 
duced a way for stationary cyclists to compete against one 
another. Called the Liferacer system, it links several cycles 
to a computer and a large color video monitor that depicts 
the exercisers as tiny figures on the screen. As the cyclists 
pedal up and down simulated hills, the monitor reveals each 
rider's position and provides an aerial view of the course. A 
window in one corner of the screen shows the rider's handi- 
cap (determined by the exerciser at the start of the race) 
and provides continuous updates on miles-per-hour 

118 



speeds, accumulated mileage, and elapsed time. 

A communal but noncompetitive innovation in station- 
ary cycling can be found at Los Angeles's Mezzeplex 
health club in a class called Spinning. After leading a 
warm-up ride, an instructor shouts out commands over 
high-energy rock music for the cyclists to stand while 
pedaling and to raise or lower the resistance levels of the 
bikes to simulate the ups and downs of real terrain. In ad- 
vanced Spinning classes, participants wear pulse moni- 
tors and yell out their rates to the instructor, who exhorts 
them to either push harder or ease up. 

VOGUE JUNE 1990 




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PEOPLE ARE Til I If I Ml. ABOUT 



llA lil/OC J'™Tiy Carter's astonishing comeback as Uncle Elder Statesman continues 
' "^ ■■ VCd apace. One day he's shaking hands with Assad in Damascus, the next with Arafat in 
Paris. This summer he'soff to Oslo for an international conference on religious and ethnic hatred. . . .But not 
even Carter can dethrone The Trick as King of the Comeback Trail . This is not Richard Nixon's first resur- 
rection, but at no time has the press so loved this man. When he's not on the cover of Time, his family birth- 
day parties make gooey items on the gossip pages. Perhaps the most telling indication of his rehabilitation is 
the belief that he will help, not hurt, Republican campaign efforts. On a recent trip (his first since resigning) to 
Capitol Hill, several congressmen actually begged him to speak at their fund-raising dinners .... 

Cf\W^%tW%n in fKOm th^ cold ^^i^^^r the spy thriller? NATO troops and our 
VVlllling III irUIII lllt; WIU defense budget are not the only casualties of the 
cold war thaw. Director John Frankenheimer was forced to term his latest East- West standoff. The Fourth 
War, "instant history." And spymaster Len Deighton has abandoned Bernard Samson for Jacques 
Pepin. Once the author of a cartoon cooking strip in the London Observer, Deighton has now published the 
ABC of French Food (Bantam). Complete with introduction from M. Pepin, the book is billed as a "gos- 
sipy" culinary glossary. . . .Publishers may be wringing their hands, but the spy business itself is 
booming — only the product has changed. Electronic and industrial technology has replaced the NATO order 
of battle as the espionage item of choice .... 



|i^^^|i^l|i^^ f^C IICIICll ^^ ^^'' of the Wall may have most affected the national 

^^'^^^ \i*^ \09\^\SM psyche — Americans are best united by a common object of 
loathing. "There is no 'us' without a corresponding 'them' to oppose," says political psychologist Howard 
Stein. "We need the bad guys, the people who embody all that stuff we want to get rid of — our greed, anger, 
avarice." Fortunately, we have Japan. . . .No one rides anti-Japanese sentiment better than Chrys- 
ler chairman Lee lacocca, but this time he's topped himself. In recent film noirish spots for the company, he 
insists to a grumpy group of execs that people wouldn't be able to tell the difference between American and 
Japanese cars ifit weren't for the labels. It's our job, he says, to win the public over. Alas, a tough job just got 
tougher. A Consumer Reports study released not long after the ads debuted says despite big improvements, 
Detroit's Big Three still trail their Japanese rivals by a wide margin .... 

M^yi^^L^ hcmdc ^^ summer's best vacation spot: Montana, before it's too late. The lumi- 
■ UilVII ilvlil\J9 naries have been moving into the aptly named Paradise Valley and its 

environs since Tom McGuane put it on the map in the seventies. Now Michael Keaton, Mel Gibson, and 
Brooke Shields have joined the drugstore cowboys who call the place their summer home — as have thou- 
sands of members of Elizabeth Clare Prophet's bizarre cult. But not to worry — there's still a profusion of real 
stars overhead. And the deer and the antelope really do roam .... Another reason to go: artist Russell Chat- 
ham's thirty-year retrospective at Bozeman's Museum of the Rockies. Chatham, who also operates a 
small press in Livingston, is a favorite of Jack Nicholson and Harrison Ford. His soul-searing landscapes are 
on view through September, and there is a terrific catalog introduced by the novelist Jim Harrison .... 

f^Qli^l^M |%«#«WAnC Choice seats at fashion shows are no longer monopolized by 
lUdlllUII IllUVCJIld fashion editors and the Ladies. During the recent New York 
fall collections, Isaac Mizrahi drew heavyweight photographers Richard Avedon, Steven Meisel, and 
Bruce Weber, who usually attends only the shows of clients Calvin Klein and Ralph Lauren. At Donna 
Karan, Diane Sawyer took notes while Patti LaBelle, clad in big shades, big hat, and big nails, snapped in 
time to her own music. . . . Imelda Marcos' s colorful Wyoming lawyer Gerry Spence offers the most creative 
excuse yet for his client's obsession with jewels, etc. As a child during Worid War II, the deposed first 
lady supported her eleven brothers and sisters by selling off the family's lone necklace — stone by stone. 
OK, but how do you explain the shoes? ... A surefire nominee for best costume design at next year's Oscars: 
Jean-Paul Gaultier, who designed the provocative, easy-to-slip-out-of clothes in Peter Greenaway's 
stunning The Cook, the Thief, His Wife, and Her Lover. — JULIA REED 

VOGUE JUNE 1990 123 




§(^i 



IVIUVItO 




ODOVAR" 



Who inspires Spain's X-rated 
director? Doris Day, for one 



When someone dresses her 
for a photo session, mara- 
villosa! — a goddess 
When she dresses 
herself, it's reeeally bad." 
Pedro Almodovar is talking about Daryl 
Hannah at the Academy Awards, where she 
slithered onstage in something that could have 
been spawned by her mermaid drag from 
Splash!, and he sounds, when wound up, as 
much the arbiter of taste as Vreeland at her most 
aphoristic. "It's not enough to be tacky," he 
says finally, smiling at himself. 

Almodovar is in town for the opening of his 
eighth and latest film. Tie Me Up! Tie Me 
Down!, which has just received an X rating. 
Talk about tacky. An X rating almost guaran- 
tees an even smaller audience than subtitled 
films usually receive. Almodovar thinks the 
rating is "ridiculous" and "hypocritical." 
And one would have to agree with him. 

Tlie story of a young mental patient who falls 
for a junkie actress and kidnaps her, hoping that 
she will learn to love him. Tie Me Up! is a surpris- 
ingly sweet film. Almost sentimental. What must 
have baffled the literal-minded censors is that in 
an American film such a relationship would be 
treated as pathology; here it is merely passion. 
Tie Me Up! is, in fact, the antithesis of, say, Fa- 
tal Attraction, which Almodovar dismisses as 
"almost fascistic" in its morality. 

All of Almodovar' s characters have what he 
calls "the morality that nature gave them." 
Nuns shoot heroin and write steamy romance 
novels. Financially strapped housewives sell 
their sons to homosexual dentists. Sex is 
played any which way but straight. But his oth- 
er preoccupation is with style. Unlike contem- 
porary American movies, which Almodovar 
says are "not very spectacular, ' ' his films — the 
costumes, the interiors, even the title graph- 
ics — revel in the surreal kitschiness of early 
Technicolor and Doris Day domestic come- 
dies, which he claims as the inspiration for his 
life. "As a director," he adds quickly. 

Almodovar uses fashion the way Jonathan 
Demme uses pop music: as a narrative element. 

VOGUE JUNE 1990 



Looking at slides from the couture collections, 
he can improvise a scenario that veers dizzying- 
ly from camp Buiiuel to sci-fi to Billy Wilder 
and back. He says he would like to make a film 
where "fashion is the protagonist." 

"Like5/owf//7?" 

"Not so intellectualized. The ideal is Fun- 
ny Face.'" 

Growing up in Franco's Spain, Almodovar 
became obsessed with clothes in the sixties, 
when fashion conflated with ideology. Now he 
is politicized by aesthetic nuance and bristles 
with opinions on everything from "the abuse of 
jewelry" to the beauty and humor of designers 
such as Lacroix, Moschino, Mugler, Gaultier. 
' ' Elegance today , " he says gnomically , " is not 
exempt from bad taste. ' ' 

A brief digression: Almodovar thinks sweats 
worn on the street are "worse than underwear" 
but does like cycling gear. Lycra in all colors, 
particularly worn by blacks; he thinks Jane Fonda 
looks "great" in Armani and Cher is "really 
fun," but that in Spain actresses are the worst- 
dressed women in any profession, bar none. 

The man himself sports a royal blue jacket, 
lapels edged in emerald green, a matching 
green mock turtleneck, baggy tomato red 
pants, and saddle shoes with reptile saddles. In 
the scurf of lower Manhattan, he appears a Pi- 
casso harlequin against a Blue Period back- 
drop. "I like your shoes," I say. 

"Armani. " He plucks his socks. "Dior. " The 
pants are Yamamoto, the jacket Comme des Car- 
bons, the shirt Gaultier Junior. "With all the great 
designers," he says, amazed, "they haven't yet 
been able to design a bag for men. ' ' 

It's no surprise, then, that Almodovar gets as 
lathered over sweats as over an X rating. Mean- 
while, he's arranging an American version of 
Tie Me Up!, which he won't write or direct ("I 
put out the hand and take the money"). He's 
also writing an original screenplay about — 

"Women in revolt," he laughs. "Women 
who kill their men. One by castrating, another 
by willing it. I must build a monster." One 
can only wonder what the monster will 
wear. — TRACY YOUNG 

125 



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Robert LaFosse with designs by Gary Lisz for Puss in Boots 



With his new faiw-tale ballet, dancer Robert 
LaFosse pays tribute both to clever felines and 

the legendary Lincoln Kirstein, david daniel reports 



VERSATILITY IS THE MAIN REQUISITE FOR SURVIVAL IN 
a ballet company. New York City Ballet's Robert La- 
Fosse has turned that attribute into an act of audacity; 
he's a one-man dance festival. He's a gracious part- 
ner — women love to dance with him. He's a first-rate 
classical dancer with a huge, cushiony jump and a stage 
personality compounded of sweetness, gallantry, and 
wit. And if you saw him last year in Jerome Robbins' 
Broadway, you know he's a shameless hoofer. 

Two years ago LaFosse produced the only classical 
work of any real charm and distinction in New York 
City Ballet's otherwise lackluster American Music 
Festival. That ballet. Woodland Sketches, set to music 
by Edward MacDowell, was a study in Victorian man- 
ners. It caught the notice of Lincoln Kirstein, the au- 
gust octogenarian cat lover and founde ^f New York 
City Ballet and the School of Americai Pallet, who 
lives in a town house near Gramercy Park ith two no- 
torious feline gunslingers, Chester and M ^ K ny . 

126 



For some thirty years Kirstein had wanted to see a 
ballet based on his favorite fairy tale, Charles Perrault's 
Puss in Boots. Kirstein asked LaFosse if he would com- 
pose such a ballet for the School of American Ballet. 

"I've been lucky in my mentors," LaFosse tells me. 
"Baryshnikov was the first to let me choreograph, for 
American Ballet Theatre. Later, when Jerome Robbins 
and Peter Martins invited me to join NYCB , I told them 
I was as interested in choreographing as dancing. So far 
I've made two ballets for the company. But it's extra 
special to be able to do something for Lincoln. At Lin- 
coln's eightieth birthday celebration, when Peter an- 
nounced that the company was planning a production 
of The Sleeping Beauty- as a present to Lincoln, he re- 
marked how hard it was to give Lincoln anything be- 
cause he doesn't like much to begin with and already 
has everything besides. So I'm really lucky if I can give 
Lincoln a little something he wants." 

Just how, I wonder, does one go about making a ► 128 

VOGUE JUNE 1990 




(ED I& l*'W Arvncin I dmb \taioi ( A. Int. 



1989 Car and Driver Ten Best List 



Wfe could go on and on. 




1990 Cat and Driver len Best I>ist 



the eight years Car and Driver rmgazxDc has presented its Ten Best list, only one car has been chosen every time. The Accord. 



HONDA. 



OUE JUNE 1990 



127 



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DANCE 



story ballet from scratch? ' 'First I met with Lincoln," LaFosse ex- 
plains. "He showed me a very elaborate libretto he'd written for the 
ballet. That gave me the inspiration for my own libretto. Together 
we decided on Larry Spivack to write the music, and Lincoln com- 
missioned a score from him. Larry wrote the music for the produc- 
tion oi Metamorphosis Misha was in last year. And we both agreed 
that Gary Lisz should be commissioned to do the sets and cos- 
tumes. Gary has a great theatrical sense and knowledge of histori- 
cal style. He had designed my Woodland Sketches and last season 
made a beautiful set of costumes" for Balanchine's Tchaikovsky Pi- 
ano Concerto No. 2.'^ 

Larry Spivack picks up the story. "Writing a nineteenth-cen- 
tury-type story ballet is not the sort of thing a modem composer 
is asked every day. Robby and I listened to a lot of Delibes — 
Sylvia and Coppelia — and to Herold's La Fille Mai Gar dee, to 
get a sense of the logistics of a story ballet. Then Robby broke 
down his libretto into specific timings: a minute and a half of 
this, three minutes of that, so much music for a mime scene, an 
entrance here, a dance for the corps de ballet there. He often 
specified the speed, meter, and rhythmic profile he needed. I'd 
write a little music every day, take it to the studio the next, and 
Robby would immediately choreograph it. The ballet came to 
life at the rate of about a minute a day. ' ' 

In order to set the right tone with his sets and costumes, Gary 
Lisz read "a ton of books of fairy tales — ^you know, the ones with 
pictures — written in every language there is. Did you know that 
Puss in Boots was the Empress Josephine's pet name for Napo- 
leon? She called him chat botte because he was so clever and suc- 
ceeded against all odds. That's why you always see Puss dressed 
like Napoleon. I felt I had no choice but to set the story in the Em- 
pire period. And for the finale, the wedding divertissements, which 
is Robby 's own addition to the story, I decided to pretend that all 
the characters were at a masquerade ball. I based those designs on 
the medieval manuscript the Tres Riches H cures de Jean, Due de 
Berry . Which was a good excuse for bringing in a few unicorns and 
using fabulous colors like scarlet, peacock, and emerald. " 

For all its sweet fantasy, however, LaFosse 's Puss in Boots is 
solidly practical: it is a graduation piece that demonstrates the 
entire syllabus of the School of American Ballet. Students are 
expected to display their skills in classical dancing, mime, act- 
ing, character dancing, and the pas de deux and variations. La- 
Fosse uses a cast of some three dozen of the school's advanced 
students, most of whom are from sixteen to eighteen years old. 
And he has included dances for six miniature butterflies, so even 
the eight- and nine-year-olds can begin to get stage experience. 

I ask LaFosse if he found it difficult to adjust to the demands of 
such an old-fashioned mode as a ballet with a story. "Not at 
all," he says. "In fact, this is exactly where my real interests are 
right now. I think it's time we gave so-called Modernism a rest. 
Everybody keeps on trying to do what they think are Balanchine- 
type ballets, and no one can even come close to what he did. So I 
think it's time to start telling stories again." I ask if he already 
has another project in mind. "Yes, indeed," he jumps in. "And 
this time no sweet fairy-tale stuff. Gary and Larry and I have al- 
ready prepared thirty minutes of what's going to be a gigantic 
piece on the death of Osiris. No butterflies. The stage is going to 
be covered in blood and guts. Well, maybe not covered, but you 
see, Osiris is this Egyptian god, and . . . " • 



128 



VOGUE Jl'NE 1990 



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THEATER 



The fate of British theater? john heilpern, reviewing 
A Clockwork Orange 2004, is pessimistic 



A CLOCKWORK ORANGE. ANTHONY BURGESS'S CLASSIC 
icon of demonic teenage ultraviolence, has broken all rec- 
ords in its theatrical reincarnation by the Royal Shake- 
speare Company in London. Little wonder. Nothing 
could be more contemporary. 

The infamous thug-droogs of Burgess's 1962 novella 
were made mythological (and dangerously chic) in Stan- 
ley Kubrick's 1971 cult movie version. But the novella 
itself, adapted for the RSC by Burgess, is a work of fright- 
ening social prophecy, anticipating today's Crips and 
Bloods of the gang wars in Los Angeles, the wilding hor- 
rors of New York City, and the punk clockwork Lucifers 
of London's aimless street crime. Even Burgess's invent- 
ed hip language predates, in its courtly way, hip-hop and 
rap. The question is, how did Burgess and the Royal 
Shakespeare do onstage? 

O my brothers! I and other tolchocking reviewers 
viddy the show, we viddy the red, red krovvy , and we sit 
pretty polly patient, but alas, no like what we viddy. 

In other words, the RSC production, unfortunately, 
doesn't work. It is comic strip, plodding, and bland. It is 
almost impossible to make the motiveless fury of Bur- 
gess's cast of killers neutralizingly dull, but the RSC suc- 
ceeds. It put me in a perverse moral dilemma — longing, 
in the name of involvement, for more fire and therefore 
more violence. Even the music by The Edge and Bono of 
U2 was muffled. "Neo-wallpaper" is what Burgess 
called the rock score, a little tactlessly, on opening night. 

Not that Burgess himself is blameless. The central idea 
of A Clockwork Orange isn't, as his critics claim, to 
glamorize evil. Its theme springs from his Catholicism, 
but its metaphysics is muddled. When Burgess's young 
hero is brainwashed out of his violence by the state, he 
loses his freedom of choice. He becomes a clockwork or- 
ange, something juicy and "sweet" forced into becom- 
ing a mechanical object. Burgess claims this is a worse 
social evil than the freedom to choose evil — a debatable 
proposition. Certainly no victim of a violent crime would 
accept it. Nor would any criminologist today accept Bur- 
gess's sentimental notion that his hero is redeemed by 
simply growing up. 

So for all the potential of its chilling timeliness, the 
Clockwork Orange 2004 production was botched, as if 
Burgess and the RSC had softened and neutralized its 
message into clockwork. But in a painful irony, that too 
could now be the fate of the beleaguered Royal Shake- 
speare Company itself. 

In spite of the box-office success of the new produc- 
tion, the RSC has announced a desperate economy mea- 
sure. Both theaters at i^s London base are to close in 
November for four months — and conceivably forever. 
It's a miserable sign of the times. There isn't a great na- 
tional arts company in Britain not in deficit: the RSC by 

132 



about £4 million; the Royal Opera House by £3 million; 
the South Bank Centre by £900,000; the English National 
Opera by £500,000 (and threatened with closure); the 
Royal National Theatre by £350,000, with no reserve 
in the kitty and, like the RSC, a severely reduced reper- 
toire. The subsidized theater in England, so admired in 
America, is under attack from Mrs. Thatcher's "market 
force" philosophy. The outcome is that the RSC — the 
biggest single organization for the performing arts in Brit- 
ain — is artistically compromised, underfunded, and reli- 




A dystopian future: RSC's A Clockwork Orange 2004 

ant on U.S. -style corporate and private sponsorship. 

Go the way of America, warns Arthur Miller, and En- 
gland loses its unique theater tradition to the production of 
commercial "shows." He's right. The RSC production 
of A Clockwork Orange 2004 is less the finest the com- 
pany can produce, more a crypto-musical designed as a 
commercial blockbuster. Miller also mentioned that a 
shoe manufacturing executive had asked him, "If you be- 
lieve the theater must be subsidized by government, why 
not subsidize shoe manufacturing?" His answer, "Name 
me one classical Greek shoemaker." 

True ! But how will the RSC now survive? By Shake- 
speare alone, or more compromise? Though its produc- 
tion oiLes Miserables subsidizes the company, should 
the RSC be producing musicals? Should it have to? The 
question now facing the RSC's new artistic director 
designate, Adrian Noble, is whether he's been handed 
a great theater company or a poisoned chalice . Whatev- 
er he can do with the crisis. Noble — the son, incidental- 
ly, of an undertaker — will be forced to squeeze what's 
left of the juice from the clockwork orange. • 

VOGUE JUNE 1990 






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TELEVISION 




As public TV makes 
operagoers of couch 

potatoes, CATHLEEN SCHINE 

considers how Wagner's 
Ring plays in miniature 

THE PERFORMANCE STARTS AT EIGHT, SO BETTER 
hurry. This garment hanging on the door is the very 
thing — a terry-cloth bathrobe. Now transfer those piles 
of laundry from the bed to the floor, dim the lights — 
perfect sight lines! — and: opera. 

Opera has always been a plutocratic pleasure in this 
country. It still is, even now, when the fur-collared in- 
dustrialist/philanthropist has been supplanted by a new 
breed of patron for whom opera seats have become a 
corporate party favor. But at the same time, opera has 
also become something of a popular taste, for televi- 
sion now brings its glories into my dumpy apartment 
and yours. For thirteen years. Live from the Met has 
appeared on public television, and a whole genera- 
tion, too lazy to change the channel, has found itself, 
to its surprise, lured into the world of Verdi, Puccini, 
Bizet, and even Wagner. 

This month PBS is broadcasting the Metropolitan 
Opera's new production of Richard Wagner's The Ring 
of the Nibelungs. The first American Ring on televi- 
sion, it is very different from the disturbing, tormented 
production, directed by Patrice Chereau at Bayreuth, 
that PBS aired in 1983. The Met's Ring, conducted by 
James Levine, really is about heroism and the fall of the 
gods. The four operas, seventeen hours long, will ap- 
pear on four consecutive nights, a scheaule Wagner 
himself would have followed if only his singers hadn't 
needed to rest between performances. 

134 



For singers who can act, like Hildegard Behrens, 
this Ring's Briinnhilde, the small-screen close-ups 
create a whole new dimension to their performances. 
The delicacy of Briinnhilde's love for Wotan (James 
Morris), the depth of her sorrow, and his, when she 
betrays him, are so immediate on TV, visible brush- 
strokes left by the luxurious, sweeping music. And if 
nothing else, those singers with voices on the small 
side , which are lost in the opera house (a type of sing- 
er Wagner fans have become far too familiar with), 
will find that the microphone helps soothe their 
chronically dissatisfied listeners. 

Then there are the subtitles — they hang there, unobtru- 
sive but accessible, the clear, poetic solution to decades 
of debate about whether to sing operas in translation. Par- 
ticularly in Wagner's work, in which the music mirrors a 
character's emotions and unconscious, subtitles draw the 
listener not only into the narrative but into the caressing 
depths of the musical form as well. 

I recently spent a long dinner hstening to two opera 
buffs who, never having met until that evening, neverthe- 
less animatedly reminisced about performances they had 
both attended twenty years ago. ("Nilsson and Vickers in 
Tristan and Isolde — I was young and in the dress cir- 
cle." "Oh! I was downstairs!") They finally, sadly ac- 
knowledged that Maria Callas is indeed dead, that Jussi 
Bjorling is no more, that no one can sing Tristan these 
days. Televised opera cannot cure their diva-heldentenor 
blues. But an odd, wrenching Ring like Chereau 's, or this 
month's stem, straightforward version from the Met, can 
revive the flagging passions of opera veterans and seduce 
neophytes, plebs, and couch potatoes across the land. So 
pull on your bathrobes, tune in to Rheingold, and hear in 
its opening music what Thomas Mann described as "the 
idea of the beginning of all things . " • 

The Ring is scheduled to air June 18-21 . Check local 
listings for broadcast times. 

VOGUE JUNE 1990 



:^i 



.V>;.v- . ^ 




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you a juicy 
story. A story 
er yone in Luck, 

/ I 

[sconsin knows. It's ' 
out nerb marinated 
r steak. It's aoout braised 

steak proven^al and broiled steaks 
n company potatoes. But most or 
, it's about good lortune. Because 
my cuts or beer ^^ are surpris- 
*ly low in calories. Lower tnan 
>st people tnink. A lean, 
mmedj^^tbree- 
nee serving aver- /-^^ 
js less tban 200 /^; 




? ■ ■_■ < ^ ii calories. Round tip, lor 



example^ nardly tops 149 

i^®LikK. ij 1 . tL 4-' 

y K calories, ihats 



I calories, i nats an inspira 
'^'fl y tion to anyone nolding a 
menu. Or rollowing a diet. 
You know,£^^^pB^accord- 
ing to legend, tne town or Luck was 
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pretty good HMKBHH^ —delicious, 



ROL^D TIP 149 calorics 

IS total fat' (1.8 gms sat. fat) 

TOP ROUND 169 calories. 
i.3 gms total fat' (1.5 gms sat. fat) 



TOP LOIN 168 calories 
7.1 gms total fat' (2.7 gms sat. fat) 




in ract. Wbere would we be 
without beer? Out or 



in 



Beef. 



\ luck, I'd say. See you 
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EYE OF ROUND 141 calories 
4.0 gms total fat' (l.C gms sat. fat) 

TENDERLOIN 175 calories 
8.1 gms total fat' (3.0 gms sat. fat) 

TOP SIRLOIN 162 calories 
5.8 gms total fat' (2.3 gms sat. fat) 



Ixeal food tor real people. 



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t E I f N E 19 9 



135 






.'ih 





^.N 



Gestural abstraction: Hans Hofmann in 
his New York studio in 1957, above, and, 
LEFT, his Alagento and 6/ue, 1950. BELOW: 
Nicolas de Stael's Red ^oa^, 1954, and 
the artist in 1949 in his Paris studio. 



Retrospectives of two modern 
masters prove the passion 
of fifties abstraction remains 
relevant today, says jed perl 

THE ART OF HANS HOFMANN AND NICOLAS DE STAEL CARRIES US 
back to a time when painting was king. There's majesty to the way 
Hofmann, who only fulfilled himself as an artist as he turned sev- 
enty in 1950, covers the canvas with big, glorious blocks and 
scrawls of no-holds-barred color. And there's something suave 
and elegant and loftily sensuous in the way de Stael , who was born 
in St. Petersburg and made his 
reputation in Paris in the fifties, 
works grays and greens and 
ochers into dense, mosaiclike 
designs. Their retrospectives 
opening this month (Hofmann at 
the Whitney Museum of Ameri- 
can Art in New York City; de 
Stael at the Phillips Collection 
in Washington, D.C.) will 
transport museumgoers numbed 
by contemporary anti-art ironies 
back to a lost world of paint- 
spattered work clothes, studios 
that reeked of turpentine, and 
ashtrays that filled up with ciga- 
rette butts as the artists passed 
hours in talk about time and 
space, nature and abstraction. 
Looking at photographs ►138 




^^W\ 




f^^-Ai 



136 



VOGUE JUNE 1990 





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ART 



Their work did 

not fit the 

century's 

diminishing 

conception of 

modern art 



of Hofmann and de Stael only adds to our sense that theirs is a 
world on which a door has been firmly closed. Staring out at us 
from his narrow bedroom eyes, the tall, dark-haired de Stael has 
a romantic insularity that recalls the troubled jazz trumpet player 
Chet Baker as seen in Bruce Weber's documentary Let's Get 
Lost. And de Stael' s tragic love affairs and suicide (in Antibes in 
1955) are a plot line that we may be tempted to read in the artist's 
melancholy stares and enormous, imposing, yet somehow awk- 
ward and helpless hands. Meanwhile, Hans Hofmann 's well-fed 
figure and big rectangular face sug- 
gest another side of the story. Hof- 
mann was the father figure, a stolid, 
benign pied piper to the young in the 
now-legendary art schools that he ran 
in New York and Provincetown in the 
forties and fifties. Not only is Hof- 
mann, with his gesticulating arms, 
gone (he died in 1966); his eager stu- 
dents — an entire generation of paint- 
ers — are in large part gone as well. 
What's left are the paintings. And 
those of Hofmann and de Stael, with 

their mix of joyous expressionism and structural eclat, even now 
give off a head-spinning charge. 

Hans Hofmann was the most important art teacher in America 
from the thirties through the fifties. He influenced the Abstract 
Expressionists, especially Lee Krasner, and critics such as 
Clement Greenberg and Harold Rosenberg. A contemporary of 
Picasso and Braque, Hofmann had been in Paris in the first years 
of the new century. He taught in Munich in the twenties, and 
when he ultimately settled in New York as a refugee in 1932, he 
brought a heartfelt response to Cubist structure and Matissean 
color that lives on in countless American artists. Hofmann's 
works are fixtures in our museums; he's hardly a little-known 
artist. Yet Hofmann, like de Stael, is an artist whose work was 
too multifaceted to fit easily into the century's diminishing con- 
ception of what constituted modem art. The oeuvres of both 
Hofmann and de Stael have an unabashedly representational 
side; these artists aren't obsessed with one overarching idea. As 
Clement Greenberg pointed out in a small book about Hof- 
mann (now reprinted in the Whitney catalog, it's the most 
moving of Greenberg's writings on his contemporaries): 
"The variety of manners and even of styles in which [Hof- 
mann] works would conspire to deprive even the most sympa- 
thetic public of a clear idea of his achievement." Only now 
are we ready to exult in Hofmann's variety, to view his work 
as richly eclectic rather than chaotically erratic. 

"Pictorial life," Hofmann wrote, "is a created reality." His 
color has the overwhelming, immediate impact of a sunbaked 
landscape. And when he layers and juxtaposes his colors he 
achieves the exhilaration of a New England forest in full au- 
tumnal blaze. Hofmann's big, casual paintings are as packed 
with delightful shocks as life itself — their subject is our per- 
petual coming into being. Some images are architectonic con- 
structions of bold rectilinear forms; others are impetuous 
mixes of curvy shapes and spurts and sparks of brushwork. 
Hofmann delights in the collisions and collusions of primary 
and secondary colors. His paintings are full of the com- ► 142 



138 



VOGUE JUNE 1990 



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ART 



bat of reds and greens, oranges and blues pushing 
fiercely one against the other. Hofmann's work looks 
back to German Expressionism, the style of his 
youth, and forward to a brave new American form of 
utterance. With Hofmann, the paint surface, rich 
with textural variety, becomes a metaphor for nature 
itself. As Greenberg explained, "His paint surfaces 
breathe as no others do, opening up to animate the air 
around them."- 

Nature poetry is at the heart of de Stael's idea of art, 
too. "We are continually influenced and penetrated by 
nature," he said. In the dense-packed abstractions that 
he created in the late forties, partly under the influence 
of Braque, who admired his work and befriended him, 
nature is before our eyes, only it's been reshuffled, re- 
shaped. De Stael's colors are forest browns and greens; 
his forms are the shattered triangles of geologic forma- 
tions and the elongated rectangles of tree trunks that ex- 
pand into branches and twigs. These abstractions are 
distillates of nature; they're also meditations on growth 
and change. Some have astonishingly dense surfaces. 
In these early works the heritage of French painting is 
felt in the elegant sense of design. Later, in the fif- 
ties, de Stael seems to have wanted to break out of 
that dark forest world and reaffirm a Francophile's 
love for the pleasures of the senses. He painted jazz 
bands, bouquets, nudes, and beaches in a brighter — 
sometimes almost flashbulb bright — palette. With 
hindsight, we may be tempted to feel that these late 
compositions show the strain of his impending sui- 
cide. Some of them have been dashed off too fast and 
lack the gravity of the abstractions. But a few of his 
last, paled-out seascapes are remarkable. Their gray 
wistfulness, with echoes of Courbet and the Impres- 
sionists, haunts us. 

While Hofmann has been consistently considered a 
major modem artist, although lacking the prestige of 
Rothko or Pollock, de Stael's reputation has taken a deep 
plunge: he hasn't had an American retrospective in twen- 
ty-five years. In part this is a natural correction of his old, 
overinflated reputation. But de Stael is appreciated too lit- 
tle today, and this suggests how far we've traveled from 
the unabashed passion for pure sensation that inspired the 
art audience of the fifties. 

Like Matisse, Braque, and Picasso before them, 
Hofmann and de Stael believed that all art, no matter 
how abstract, drew its strength from our raw responses 
to the natural world. Their work, exhibited after the 
war that wrote an end to the heroic years of Modernism , 
was like the last bright flame of a half-century-old ide- 
al. That's why these retrospectives, despite their up- 
beat rhythms, have an underlying melancholy. If we're 
now ready to rethink Hofmann and de Stael, it's be- 
cause we've become so terribly conscious of our 
losses. Once again, we're wondering at the eternal 
power of paint. Where we go next can have a lot to do 
with what younger artists take away from these two 
marvelously unpredictable shows. • 



142 



VOGUE JUNE 1990 



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Dorothy Thompson 

wrote the truth for us 
about the news being 
made in this century. 

Now JOHN LEONARD 

reviews her biography 

IN HER PRIME. IN THE LATE 1930s, THE SYNDICATED COL- 
umnist Dorothy Thompson was called a 'breast-beat- 
ing Boadicea," a "wet nurse to destiny,' "the Clara 
Barton of the plutocrat in pain," "the Florence Night- 
ingale of the wounded Tory intellect." and "our self- 
appointed antifascist Joan of Arc." According to H. L. 
Mencken, "She frightens me She looks like Hin- 

144 




CLOCKWISE FROM LOWER LEFT: Dorothy in o fourth grade class 
picture; posed and poised at the start of her career; at 
her wedding to Maxim Kopf, June 1943; with Sinclair Lewis 
at the Brandenburg Gate, 1931; with fellow journalists 
Linton Wells, William L. Shirer, and Wythe Williams in 
Columbia Pictures' "Roundtable of the Screen." 

denburg as a young man. ' ' To John Hersey she seemed 
"an overpowering figure in a Wagnerian opera, a Val- 
kyrie, deciding with careless pointing of her spear who 
should die on the battlefield." Alice Roosevelt Long- 
worth said she was ' 'the only woman in history who has 
had her menopause in public and made it pay . " ' One of 
Thompson's husbands, the Nobel laureate Sin- ^146 

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clair Lewis, told her, "You. . .you are. . .a. . .a pud- 
ding ... a bread pudding . . . made of the divine host. ' ' 

Gee , they never said any of these things about Walter 
Lippmann, with whom she appeared on alternate days 
on the front page of the second section of the Herald 
Tribune. And Thompson was just as serious about in- 
ternational affairs. And she'd actually done more 
homework — on foot in Central Europe. And, on the 
most important story of her time, the Nazi madness, 
she was prescient and ferocious, predicting not only 
that Czechoslovakia would fall after 
Austria, and that Poland would fol- 
low Czechoslovakia, but also that 
surprise twist in Soviet foreign poli- 
cy, the Hitler-Stalin pact. She was, 
moreover, the only American news- 
paper colum.nist of any consequence 
to write of her fear for the fate of Eu- 
rope's Jews. (Not once, in his thou- 
sands of columns, could Lippmann 
ever bring himself to mention the 
death camps.) 

But Thompson — however ex- 
traordinary — was a woman; and the 
way our culture chose to deal with 
her success was to make fun of her. 
Sinclair Lewis made fun of her in his 
suffragette novel, Ann Vickers, and 
again in Gideon Planish, as Wini- 
fred Homeward, the Talking Woman. Garson Kanin 
made fun of her in Woman of the Year, in which a high- 
falutin Katharine Hepburn was cut down to size by a 
sportswriter, Spencer Tracy. Elmer Rice made so much 
fun of her and Sinclair Lewis in the original version of 
Cue for Passion that lawyers insisted on a rewrite. 
Even Lippmann, in a letter to his wife, wrote, ' 'Did you 
ever realize how much Dorothy is like the Statue of Lib- 
erty? Made of brass. Visible at all times to all the world. 
Holding the light aloft, but always the same light. 
. . .Capable of being admired, but difficult to love." 

After all this fun was made — after the Herald Tri- 
bune fired her because she supported FDR instead of 
Willkie in 1940; after the New York Post dropped her 
because she was deemed too soft on postwar Germany 
and insufficiently supportive of Zionism in the Middle 
East; after three marriages, all those books, an ill-fated 
Broadway play that cost her thirty thousand dollars, a 
script on Alexander Hamilton that Hollywood never 
produced, and, at the end, the embarrassing earth- 
mother essays for Ladies Home Journal — our culture 
chose to forget her. If she's shown up at all in recent de- 
cades, it's been in a walk-on or supporting role. 

From this mockery and amnesia, Peter Kurth deter- 
mines to rescue her. Kurth is a prickly advocate, sup- 
portive and exasperated, and his book American 
Cassandra: The Life of Dorothy Thompson (Little, 
Brown) goes on forever without arriving at any thesis 
but the "self-creation" of the heroine "sprung from 

146 



RIGHT: Dorothy in 
Souk Centre, 
Minnesota, 1960, for 
Sinclair Lewis 
celebration, walking 
with her daughter- 
in-law and 
grandson. BELOW: In 
1940 with the French 

forces on the |M 
Maginot Line. ' ^i.' 




I " 




nowhere." But American Cassandra nevertheless en- 
thralls. Kurth is assisted from beyond the grave by 
Thompson herself. There are millions of published 
words to construe; thousands of remarkable letters, many 
never mailed; and a diary astonishing in its candor. The 
result is a Portrait of a Lady telling us everything about 
sex and money and the brute face of the world that 
Henry James never wanted to know. Her life should 
make a terrific television miniseries. 

Late in life Thompson confessed, "I've always 
wanted to be blond — blond and kittenish." Imagine 
her, instead, in an upstate New York tum-of-the-centu- 
ry childhood, brown-braided, sturdy, freckled; a read- 
er of Job, Dickens, Shakespeare, and Leaves of Grass; 
an English immigrant clergyman's daughter. The cler- 
gyman was remembered by his daughter as ' ' sublimely 
innocent," "a bom poet" who "could pray a bird off a 
tree." She also remembered "a childhood untouched 
by neurosis," and so it might have been, at least until 
she was almost eight, when her mother died of a 
botched abortion from a potion given her without her 
knowledge by Dorothy's grandmother. The "bom 
poet" remarried. The new stepmother wasn't so much 
wicked as a hypochondriac "with an allergy to chil- 
dren." Dorothy rebelled and at age fourteen was 
kicked into exile to Chicago, where a couple of aunts 
taught her to do her hair, an English professor at a ju- 
nior college for "the poor but proud" encouraged her 
literary ambitions, and she was the only female in ►us 

VOGUE If N E 1990 



BOOKS 



the debating society. Syracuse offered a scholarship. 

' ' It was a legend at Syracuse for many years that a date 
with Dorothy Thompson had meant a walk in the moon- 
light and a talk about Hegel . ' ' From stuffing envelopes at 
the Buffalo headquarters of the New York State Woman 
Suffrage Party, she graduated to "organizer" and hit the 
road to live on fried steak and speak from farm wagons. 
When suffrage won in New York, in November 19 17, by 
ninety-four thousand votes, she was off — first to Green- 
wich Village, where she worked for an ad agency, and 
then to Cincinnati to start family hygiene and nutrition 
programs for the poor. The mayor of 
Cincinnati thought she was one of those 
"Bolsheviks," pushing "violence, 
pacifism, free love, and other obnox- 
ious ideas." 

At twenty-seven, having published 
articles in the Times, the Sun, and the 
Tribune, she set sail to see the Russian 
Revolution for herself. Her father, 
wonderfully, advised her: "Since you 
are obliged to earn your own living, it 
will not always be possible for you to remain a lady. 
But I pray you, Dorothy — please promise me that you 
will always remain a gentleman." 

Kurth deals with the woman and the career. 1 don't 
have to. Forget the woman for a minute. The journalist 
found herself on that boat with Zionists on their way to a 
conference on Palestine; immediately, she wrote about it. 
Her first scoop was an interview with leaders of the Sinn 
Fein rebellion, including MacSwiney just before he 
starved himself to death. In Paris, she wrote publicity for 
the Red Cross at a penny a line, while covering a metal- 
workers' strike in Rome. In Vienna she interviewed ev- 
erybody from Trotsky and Freud to Atatiirk, and wore a 
fur coat to her first revolution in 1921. In Prague she 
talked to Benes and Masaryk and scooped the world on 
Emperor Karl's laughable attempt to seize the Hungarian 
throne. In Berlin in 1926 she socialized with Kurt Weill, 
Lotte Lenya, Alma Mahler, Klaus and Erika Mann, Max- 
im Gorki, and Albert Einstein. 

In one breathless year she jumped from free-lancing 
for the New York Evening Post and the Christian Sci- 
ence Monitor to stringing for the International News Ser- 
vice to covering Austria, Hungary, Yugoslavia, 
Czechoslovakia, Romania, Bulgaria, Greece, and Tur- 
key for the Philadelphia Public Ledger. Picture this: in 
1926 revolution breaks out in Poland and Thompson's at 
the opera in Vienna and the banks are closed; so she 
knocks at night on Freud's door, borrows some money, 
and is on the next train to Warsaw. In 1927 she went to 
Russia with Theodore Dreiser. In 1928 she was back in 
New York, at the Algonquin. 

I'm leaving out a marriage or two, a house in Italy, 
and a child. In 1 930-3 1 the career took !ier back to Eu- 
rope, where she interviewed and desp. Hitler ("the 
perverter of Nietzsche") and warned hei .i.uers that 
"unless things change radically, there will be war in 

148 



Thompson's 

life should 

make a terrific 

television 

miniseries 



Europe within the decade — before the 1930s are out. 
And I've been where it will start." After lecturing all 
over the U.S. on fascism, she went back again to Ger- 
many vin 1934. Hitler himself expelled her from the 
Third Reich, "for the crime of blasphemy." 

I'm leaving out affairs with H. R. Knickerbocker, 
Edgar Mowrer, John Gunther (maybe), and an actor 
who wore a hairnet playing tennis. What happened 
next to the career, in 1936, was that Helen Rogers 
Reid, who ran the Herald Tribune while her husband 
drank, hired Thompson as a thrice-weekly colum- 
nist. By 1940 she had seven million 
readers. She wrote in bed, in long- 
hand, chain-smoking Camels. She 
was against Social Security, the 
WPA, organized labor, Roosevelt's 
court-packing plan, and isolationist 
Charles Lindbergh, "this somber cre- 
tin. " Of the quarter-million words she 
wrote between 1938 and 1940 — not 
counting her radio program and her 
lecture series — three-fifths were de- 
voted to attacking Hitler and the cowards who sus- 
tained him. 

In 1939, in England to address the House of Com- 
mons, she had lunch with Nancy Astor and dinner with 
H. G. Wells, went to the movies with Anthony Eden, 
and spent the weekend with Winston Churchill. In New 
York, on her way to speak to the Phi Beta Kappa Soci- 
ety, she stopped to heckle a rally of the bund; storm 
troopers muscled her out the door. 

I'm leaving out some lesbianism. She also predict- 
ed Pearl Harbor. From the war, when at last she got it, 
she hoped for a "rational, reasonable peace," not the 
"insanity" of "unconditional surrender." This 
made her suddenly "pro-German" to Post readers, 
as her sympathy for displaced Arabs and her mem- 
bership in the C.I. A. -funded American Friends of 
the Middle East made her suddenly "anti-Semitic." 
She was for the United Nations, against atom bombs, 
and otherwise in the postwar period a conventional 
cold warrior, unless you count a vote in 1948 for so- 
cialist Norman Thomas. She called McCarthyism 
"childish" but endorsed congressional investiga- 
tions into "subversive" activities and had her mud- 
dle-minded doubts about free speech in "dangerous 
times." She managed to admire, simultaneously, 
Douglas MacArthur and J. Robert Oppenheimer. She 
found nothing new at all in Simone de Beauvoir's The 
Second Sex. 

I'm leaving out the Dexedrine, the bennies, and the 
drinking. And the commune in Vermont. And the flying 
saucers. On the long curve of her decline, she returned to 
the faith of her father, and something more mystical, too. 
She advised readers in the Ladies Home Journal: "A 
claim on the moon should be staked out, it seems to me, 
by the women of the whole world — including, of course, 
Russian women — to protect the chaste huntress, ^ 150 

VOGUE JUNE 1990 



BOOKS 



wielding love's bow, from the rape of the 
warriors." Asked by the Boston Globe, 
' 'What is the best thing you can say about 
yourself?' ' she replied: ' "1 never wrote to 
be popular. It cost me a lot." 

You are wondering about the woman 
now — the miniseries. Her initial choice 
among men was the Budapest-bom, 
Sorbonne-educated Joseph Bard, "who 
looked like an Egyptian prince, his hair 
lay on his head like burnished 
wings. ..." She married him, and she 
kept him, and he never got around to 
finishing his magnum opus. The Mind 
of Europe. He was too busy bedding her 
best friends. "Like all intellectual 
women." complained Bard, "she 
thinks you can starch your prick at the 
nearest men ' s laundry . ' ' 

In July 1 927 , the month of her divorce 
from gallant Joseph, she met her second 
husband, an Ugly American and a drunk: 
Sinclair Lewis. About him she'd later 
confide to her diary. "I say to myself, 
'You are totally unimportant and you are 
married to a man of genius — if you give 



your life to making him happy it is worth 
it. ' But it isn't! I can really do nothing for 
him. He is like a vampire — he absorbs all 
my vitality, all my energy, all my beau- 
ty — I get incredibly dull." About her, 
whom he'd beat up in alcoholic rages, he 
was quoted, "If I ever divorce Dorothy, 
I'll name Adolf Hitler as co-respon- 
dent." (She likes Europe more than she 
likes me!) They lasted long enough to- 
gether to ruin a child. 

Much later, she'd write him, "I am 
glad that you are happy. I happen not to 
be. I am not happy, because I have no 
home, because I have an ill and difficult 
child without a father. Because I have 
loved a man who didn't exist. Because I 
am widowed of an illusion. Because I am 
tremblingly aware of the tragedy of the 
world we live in." A letter she never 
mailed is more remarkable: 

There are things in my heart that 
you do not dream of, things that 
are compounded of passion and 
fury and love and hate and pride 
and disgust and tenderness and 



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contrition, things that are wild and 

fierce . . . and you ask me to write 

you conventional letters because 

you are in "exile." From what? 

From whom? 

. . .Maybe some time you 

might come home yourself. You 

might go a long way and do worse . 

As a matter of fact and prophecy — 

you will. 

In her unhappiness she fell for tht 
sculptor Christa Winsloe, author o 
The Child Manuela, from which the 
notorious movie Maedchen in Uniforn 
had been made. It wasn't Thompson'^ 
first lesbian experience, but her firs 
(and last) lesbian love affair. Al- 
though she wrote an interesting poen 
about it, it seems not to have been a bi^ 
improvement on her marriages to tht 
cad and the drunk. "I think, you see 
that you are very much better than 
am. I think, perhaps, that I have some- 
thing which this very-much-better 
than-I-am person can use." Christy 
dumped her, in Salzburg, for the Ital 
ian basso Ezio Pinza. 

The last important man in her life, witf 
whom she fell in love at age forty-nine 
was the refugee artist Maxim Kopf, a Vi 
ennese-bom Czech Secessionist (with 
concentration camp in his resume) de- 
scribed by The New York Times as 
more coherent and disciplined Kokosch 
ka." This union in Vermont seems tc 
have worked out nicely, at least aftei 
Thompson bought off Kopfs previous 
wife for thirty thousand dollars. She like 
his painting, detecting in it "a weiro 
sense of unreality." 

While she was still on Central Park 
West, wanting it all, working twice as 
hard to get it; talking too much; ex- 
plaining Europe to everybody who 
didn't want to hear; the object of so 
much satire, and yet like the first Cas- 
sandra, so often right where the wits 
were wrong; not, perhaps, an original 
thinker, but equipped with a compass 
that pointed true north to a magnetic 
pole of decencies; run through by the 
century as if by a sword; a role model , 
a cautionary tale, and, of course, a 
heroine, she said: "I'd throw the state 
of the nation into the ash can for any- 
one I loved." 

It's a measure of Kurth's biography 
that I don't believe her. • 



150 



\ O G I' E I I- N E 1 9 9 ( 



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HEALTH 



Hysterectomy is usually 

performed not to save 

a woman's life but 

to improve its quality. 

And very often, 

there are other options. 

LYNN PAYER investigates 

WHEN KAREN, A UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATOR, WAS 
twenty-eight, she started having pains in her abdomen 
that were eventually diagnosed as a fibroid tumor. The 
benign growth didn't require immediate treatment. But 
seven years later, the fibroid had grown larger and the 
pain had become excruciating. At thirty-five she was 
told by her gynecologist that her uterus was "all out of 
whack'' and that she needed a hysterectomy. 

Karen's first reaction was to cry. Then her doctor 
told her that there was an alternative: he could remove 
the fibroid tumor without taking out her uterus too. 
Karen opted for this operation, technically known as 
myomectomy. Not long afterward she met the man she 
was to marry, and last January, at the age of forty, she 
gave birth to a healthy baby boy. 

By choosing a less radical operation, Karen not only 
preserved her ability to have a child, she avoided the 
sometimes severe side effects that can accompany re- 
moval of the uterus — from decreased intensity of or- 
gasm to depression, bone loss, urinary problems, and 
increased risk of heart attack. "We are 
just now finding out that hysterectomy 
often causes as many problems as it is 
meant to cure," says Bennett Alberts, 
a gynecologist in Portland, Oregon, 
who has joined the ranks of doctors 
seeking alternatives to the second 
most commonly performed operation 
in the United States. 

Not all women experience side ef- 
fects after hysterectomy, of course. 
And many women find that whatever 
side effects they do experience disaj. 
pear with hormone replacement therapy. But hormones 
are complex and often unpredictable in iheir effects, 
and not all women can count on synthetic substitutions 
to restore their hormone balance. Estrogen, progester- 
one , and other hormones produced by the ovaries influ- 
ence mood, sexual desire, temperature regulation, 
calcium absorption by the bones, and the body's pro- 
duction of "good" cholesterol, among other things. 
These functions can be disrupted even when the ovaries 
are left intact — as is the case in up to half of all hyster- 

152 



"We are now 

finding out that 

hysterectomy 

can cause as 

many problems 

as it cures" 



ectomies. (No one is sure exactly what role the uterus 
plays in hormone regulation, but the substances it pro- 
duces may help insure the proper functioning of the 
ovarie>s.) Given all these unknowns, many women — 
and at least some of their doctors — are beginning to 
think twice about hysterectomy. 

Why Doctors Need Convincing 

Doctors who worry about hysterectomy's side effects are 
bucking a long-standing trend. In the 1970s, a number of 
prominent gynecologists and even standard medical texts 
were advocating hysterectomy for every woman once 
she'd completed her family, in order to prevent cancer of 
the uterus and ovaries (which together are responsible for 
less than 5 percent of female deaths) and to free women 
from the fear of pregnancy and the bother of menstrua- 
tion. The hysterectomy rate soared as a result. If current 
figures hold true, one of three American women will have 
at least her uterus removed, usually in her thirties or for- 
ties. European women are less than half as likely as 
American women to undergo hysterectomy, although 
they can expect to live at least as long. 

Reports about side effects following hysterectomy 
do crop up regularly in the medical literature — but per- 
haps not often enough to convince doctors to be more 
cautious. Adam M. Smith, a gastroenterological sur- 
geon at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland, did re- 
search showing that a significant number of women 
reported severe constipation beginning soon after 
their hysterectomies. So far, no journal has been in- 
terested in publishing a long version of his paper. "I 
think there is some feeling among gynecologists that 
this is rocking the boat," he says. 

In fact, no one has ever thoroughly studied hysterec- 
tomy's long-term consequences. Robert Keller, a sur- 
geon who directs the Maine Medical 
Assessment Foundation, says that re- 
search on hysterectomy has tended to 
focus on the immediate outcome of the 
surgery. "This may be painting the op- 
eration in too rosy alight," he says. His 
group is attempting to remedy that now 
by comparing, over a period of years, 
women who have had alternative treat- 
ments with those who've had hysterec- 
tomies for the same problems. 

How doctors are trained, and how they 
are paid, may also help explain hysterec- 
tomy's popularity. "Our medical training often focuses 
on disease, rather than on patients," says Mack Lipkin, 
an internist who directs the primary -care program at New 
York University School of Medicine. "Sometimes that's 
to the detriment of the patient, considering her psyche and 
social self as well as her physical abnormality. And gyne- 
cology training, in particular, is too often about how to do 
surgery rather than whether to do it. " Doctors, too, tend 
to eam more for doing procedures than for discussing the 
alternatives. Dr. Alberts, for example, says that his ► 154 

VOG L E .1 r N E 19 90 



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income has dropped since he began spending more time 
talking to women and less time operating. 

When Is a Hysterectomy Necessary? 

Only about 1 1 percent of hysterectomies in the United 
States are performed for ovarian or uterine cancer. The 
vast majority of the rest — for fibroid tumors, excessive 
bleeding, a dropped or prolapsed uterus, or endometri- 
osis, in which tissue from the uterine lining implants out- 
side the uterus — are ostensibly done to improve a 
woman's quality of life. A woman considering a hyster- 
ectomy needs to understand that, most of the time, this is 
what's at stake — and that a gynecologist may not mea- 
sure quality of life in exactly the same way she does. 

For example, benign fibroid tumors account for about 
40 percent of hysterectomies in women thirty-five to for- 
ty-four years old. Fibroids may cause pain, heavy bleed- 
ing, or no symptoms at all. In any case, because their 
growth is stimulated by estrogen, fibroids shrink at meno- 
pause as the body's production of the hormone falls off. 
Some women, however, are convinced that hysterecto- 
my is necessary because fibroids may become cancerous 
or damage the kidneys, when in fact this is very rare. 

' 'The percentage of fibroids that turn out to be cancer- 
ous is so low , compared for example with the incidence of 
breast cancer, which is very high, that it would make 
more sense to remove both of a woman's normal breasts 
to prevent cancer than to remove her uterus for that rea- 
son," says Rodolphe Maheux, a gynecologist at the Cen- 
ter for Endocrinology of Reproduction and Infertility of 
the Saint-Frangois d'Assise Hospital in Quebec. This 
type of cancer should be suspected only when a fibroid is 
growing very rapidly, he says. 

Large fibroids can damage the kidneys, but irrevers- 
ible damage is rare. Ruth Goldstein, a radiologist special- 
izing in ultrasound at the University of California, San 
Francisco, says that even when a sonogram shows the fi- 
broid encroaching on the ureters, tubes that carry urine 
from the kidneys to the bladder, there's no need to rush 
into surgery. "A woman can have a very large uterus 
without it causing any pressure on a ureter. And the many 
women with mild obstructions of the ureters can still be 
followed for a period of years. Even if there is severe 
pressure, other tests should be performed before surgery 
is recommended. " 

Except in the case of cancer, or for bleeding so heavy 
that a large amount of blood is lost very quickly, many 
doctors maintain that watching and waiting is appropriate 
for most of the conditions for which hysterectomy is per- 
formed. Treatment nearly always depends on how both- 
ersome symptoms are. 

The Alternatives 

When it is time for treatment, there are a number of op- 
tions to consider along with hysterectomy: 

Myomectomy. In this operation for fibroid tumors, the 
tumors are removed while preserving the uterus and the 
cervix. Unless the uterus is very large and has numerous 



fibroids, myomectomy is easier in many ways than hys- 
terectomy, says Jeanette S. Brown, an assistant professor 
of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Califor- 
nia, S,an Francisco. "One of the more serious complica- 
tions of a hysterectomy is damaging a ureter," she says, 
"and you don't have that complication with a myomec- 
tomy, because you're not anywhere near the ureters." 

While in most myomectomies the fibroids are removed 
through an incision in the abdomen, fibroids that protrude 
into the uterus on a stalk can sometimes be removed 
through the vagina. (This type of fibroid is often to blame 
for the very heavy bleeding that leads many women in 
their forties to seek surgery.) Robert Neuwirth, director 
of obstetrics and gynecology at St. Luke's-Roosevelt 
Hospital in New York City, pioneered this procedure 
about a decade ago and has now used it on some two hun- 
dred women. 

The main disadvantage of both types of myomectomy 
is that a uterus that forms fibroids once may grow them 
again. The chance that this will happen appears to decline 
with age: a woman in her twenties who has a myomec- 
tomy is more likely to need further treatment in a few 
years than a woman in her forties. 

Endometrial ablation . Many women have heavy and 
unpredictable bleeding as they approach menopause. 
These symptoms can be eliminated with techniques that 
destroy the inner lining of the uterus, or endometrium, 
which makes up the menstrual flow. (Because the endo- 
metrium also nourishes the fetus, endometrial ablation 
should not be considered by any woman who still wishes 
to have children.) 

In Europe, where women often want to continue to 
menstruate, albeit less heavily, pieces of the endometri- 
um are removed. In this country, doctors usually attempt 
to end all menstrual bleeding and therefore try to destroy 
all of the endometrial lining, either with a laser or a roller- 
ball electrode. 

Neither of these procedures requires an incision into 
the abdomen, so recovery is quick — a couple of days in- 
stead of four to six weeks for a hysterectomy — and both 
can be performed on an outpatient basis in a hospital. 

Milton Goldrath, chief of obstetrics and gynecology at 
Sinai Hospital in Detroit, has performed close to five hun- 
dred ablations using a laser, with about 70 percent of the 
women having no subsequent periods and about 30 per- 
cent having only spotting. The technique can have risks if 
improperly performed, however. Because large amounts 
of liquid must be used to cool the uterus during the proce- 
dure, and those fluids can leak into the bloodstream, the 
body's fluid balance can be upset — a potentially danger- 
ous development. Goldrath believes that endometrial ab- 
lation is appropriate only for women whose bleeding 
problems are severe enough to justify hysterectomy. 

Hormone treatment. Many women stop ovulating as 
they approach menopause — and thus stop producing pro- 
gesterone while continuing to produce estrogen. The ir- 
regular or heavy bleeding that may result can be con- 
trolled with drugs. "A synthetic version of the ►156 



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HEALTH 



hormone progesterone, called medroxyprogesterone ace- 
tate, works beautifully in nonovulating women approach- 
ing menopause," says Goldrath. The same drug can also 
be used to treat women whose ovulation has been shut 
down by obesity or rapid weight loss. 

Gonadotrophic-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs 
also give doctors many more options in treating fibroids, 
endometriosis, and irregular bleeding. These synthetic 
versions of chemicals made naturally by the body work 
by effectively shuning off all production of estrogen and 
progesterone by the ovaries, causing fibroids to shrink, 
bleeding to stop, and endometriosis implants to shrivel. 
The problem is that GnRH analogs essentially induce 
menopause